Search results for 'Spencer D. Kelly' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Spencer D. Kelly (2003). From Past to Present: Speech, Gesture, and Brain in Present-Day Human Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):230-231.score: 870.0
    This commentary presents indirect support for Corballis's claim that language evolved out of a gestural system in our evolutionary past. Specifically, it presents behavioral and neurological evidence that present-day speech and gesture continue to be tightly integrated in language production and comprehension.
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  2. D. Kellner, E. Kelly, E. Laclau, T. De Lauretis, C. MacKinnon, S. McNeill, M. Maguire, P. Major-Poeul, H. Marcuse & B. Martin (1993). Jaggar, A. 245 Jeffreys, S. 58 Johnson, D. 182 Kamuf, P. 169, 173. In Caroline Ramazanoglu (ed.), Up Against Foucault: Explorations of Some Tensions Between Foucault and Feminism. Routledge. 265.score: 580.0
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  3. Paul Kelly (2001). M. W. Taylor, Men Versus the State, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1992, Pp. X + 292.M. W. Taylor (Ed.), Herbert Spencer and the Limits of the State, Bristol, Thoemmes Press, 1996, Pp. Xxvi + 269. [REVIEW] Utilitas 13 (01):129-.score: 360.0
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  4. Christopher Kelly (2006). Carrié (J.-M.), Lizzi Testa (R.) (Edd.) 'Humana Sapit.' Études d'Antiquité Tardive Offertes à Lellia Cracco Ruggini. (Bibliothèque de l'Antiquité Tardive 3.) Pp. Xxii + 504, Ills. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2002. Paper, €65. ISBN: 2-503-51279-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):488-.score: 360.0
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  5. C. Kelly (1997). Review. Prophets and Emperors: Human and Divine Authority From Augustus to Theodosius. D Potter. The Classical Review 47 (1):123-124.score: 360.0
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  6. Gavin Kelly (2008). Bowman (A.K.), Garnsey (P.), Cameron (A.) (Edd.) The Cambridge Ancient History. Second Edition. Vol. XII. The Crisis of Empire, A.D. 193–337. Pp. Xviii + 965, Ills, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Cased, £120, US$220. ISBN: 978-0-521-30199-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01).score: 360.0
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  7. Charles J. Kelly (1992). Augustus De Morgan and the Logic of Relations. By Daniel D. Merrill. Modern Schoolman 70 (1):70-73.score: 360.0
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  8. Conor Mayo-Wilson & Kevin Kelly, Ockham Efficiency Theorem for Stochastic Empirical Methods.score: 340.0
    Ockham’s razor is the principle that, all other things being equal, scientists ought to prefer simpler theories. In recent years, philosophers have argued that simpler theories make better predictions, possess theoretical virtues like explanatory power, and have other pragmatic virtues like computational tractability. However, such arguments fail to explain how and why a preference for simplicity can help one find true theories in scientific inquiry, unless one already assumes that the truth is simple. One new solution to that problem is (...)
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  9. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Relevance of Phenomenology to the Philosophy of Language and Mind. New York: Garland Publishing.score: 300.0
    Through discussion of phenomenological and analytic traditions such as the philosophical problems of perceptual content, the content of demonstrative thoughts and the unity of proposition, Kelly explains that these concepts are not as alien to one another as most people believe.
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  10. Michael Kelly, Post-Structuralism.score: 300.0
    Michael Kelly is the author of 68 entries altogether. The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French is far more than a simple revision of the original Oxford Companion to French Literature , published in 1959, and described by The Listener as the `standard work of reference for English-speaking enquirers into French literature'. As the change in title implies, this completely new work presents an authoritative guide not only to ten centuries of literature produced in the territory now called (...)
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  11. A. Stievano, M. G. D. Marinis, D. Kelly, J. Filkins, I. Meyenburg-Altwarg, M. Petrangeli & V. Tschudin (2012). A Proto-Code of Ethics and Conduct for European Nurse Directors. Nursing Ethics 19 (2):279-288.score: 280.0
    The proto-code of ethics and conduct for European nurse directors was developed as a strategic and dynamic document for nurse managers in Europe. It invites critical dialogue, reflective thinking about different situations, and the development of specific codes of ethics and conduct by nursing associations in different countries. The term proto-code is used for this document so that specifically country-orientated or organization-based and practical codes can be developed from it to guide professionals in more particular or situation-explicit reflection and values. (...)
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  12. D. Sleeman, A. E. Kelly, R. Martinak, R. D. Ward & J. L. Moore (1989). Studies of Diagnosis and Remediation with High School Algebra Students. Cognitive Science 13 (4):551-568.score: 280.0
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  13. Sean D. Kelly (2005). The Puzzle of Temporal Experience. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 208--238.score: 240.0
    There you are at the opera house. The soprano has just hit her high note – a glassshattering high C that fills the hall – and she holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds the note for such a long time that after a while a funny thing happens: you no longer seem only to hear it, the note as it is currently sounding, that glass-shattering high C that is loud and (...)
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  14. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Seeing Things in Merleau-Ponty. In C. Tarman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge. 74-110.score: 240.0
    The passage above comes from the opening pages of Merleau-Ponty’s essay on Edmund Husserl. It proposes a risky interpretive principle. The main feature of this principle is that the seminal aspects of a thinker’s work are so close to him that he is incapable of articulating them himself. Nevertheless, these aspects pervade the work, give it its style, its sense and its direction, and therefore belong to it essentially. As Martin Heidegger writes, in a passage quoted by Merleau-Ponty:
    The (...)
    The goal of Merleau-Ponty’s essay, he says, is “to evoke this un-thought-of element in Husserl’s thought”.3. (shrink)
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  15. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Non-Conceptual Content of Perceptual Experience: Situation Dependence and Fineness of Grain. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):601-608.score: 240.0
    I begin by examining a recent debate between John McDowell and Christopher Peacocke over whether the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual. Although I am sympathetic to Peacocke’s claim that perceptual content is non-conceptual, I suggest a number of ways in which his arguments fail to make that case. This failure stems from an over-emphasis on the "fine-grainedness" of perceptual content - a feature that is relatively unimportant to its non-conceptual structure. I go on to describe two other features of (...)
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  16. Sean D. Kelly (2007). What Do We See (When We Do)? In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Reading Merleau-Ponty: On Phenomenology of Perception. Routledge. 107-128.score: 240.0
    1. The philosophical problem of what we see My topic revolves around what is apparently a very basic question. Stripped of all additions and in its leanest, most economical form, this is the question: "What do we see?" But in this most basic form the question admits of at least three different interpretations. In the first place, one might understand it to be an epistemological question, perhaps one with skeptical overtones. "What do we see?", on this reading, is short for (...)
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  17. Sean D. Kelly, Articles.score: 240.0
    I begin by examining a recent debate between John McDowell and Christopher Peacocke over whether the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual. Although I am sympathetic to Peacocke’s claim that perceptual content is non-conceptual, I suggest a number of ways in which his arguments fail to make that case. This failure stems from an over-emphasis on the “fine-grainedness” of perceptual content – a feature that is relatively unimportant to its non-conceptual structure. I go on to describe two other features of (...)
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  18. Sean D. Kelly (2001). Demonstrative Concepts and Experience. Philosophical Review 110 (3):397-420.score: 240.0
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  19. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Bridging Embodied Cognition and Brain Function: The Role of Phenomenology. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):261-266.score: 240.0
    Both cognitive science and phenomenology accept the primacy of the organism-environment system and recognize that cognition should be understood in terms of an embodied agent situated in its environment. How embodiment is seen to shape our world, however, is fundamentally different in these two disciplines. Embodiment, as understood in cognitive science, reduces to a discussion of the consequences of having a body like ours interacting with our environment and the relationship is one of contingent causality. Embodiment, as understood phenomenologically, represents (...)
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  20. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Sean D. Kelly (2007). Heterophenomenology: Heavy-Handed Sleight-of-Hand. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):45-55.score: 240.0
    We argue that heterophenomenology both over- and under-populates the intentional realm. For example, when one is involved in coping, one’s mind does not contain beliefs. Since the heterophenomenologist interprets all intentional commitment as belief, he necessarily overgenerates the belief contents of the mind. Since beliefs cannot capture the normative aspect of coping and perceiving, any method, such as heterophenomenology, that allows for only beliefs is guaranteed not only to overgenerate beliefs but also to undergenerate other kinds of intentional phenomena.
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  21. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Sean D. Kelly, Notes on Embodiment in Homer: Reading Homer on Moods and Action in the Light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty.score: 240.0
    Homer has a unique understanding of the body. On his view the body is that by means of which we are subject to moods, and moods are what attune us to our situation. Being attuned to a situation, in turn, opens us to the various ways things and people can be engaging. We agree with Homer that this receptivity is evident throughout our entire existence. It characterizes everything from our basic bodily skills for coping with objects and people to our (...)
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  22. Sean D. Kelly (2004). Reference and Attention: A Difficult Connection. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):277-86.score: 240.0
    I am very much in sympathy with the overall approach of John Campbell’s paper, “Reference as Attention”. My sympathy extends to a variety of its features. I think he is right to suppose, for instance, that neuropsychological cases provide important clues about how we should treat some traditional philosophical problems concerning perception and reference. I also think he is right to suppose that there are subtle but important relations between the phenomena of perception, action, consciousness, attention, and reference. I even (...)
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  23. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 240.0
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are likely to (...)
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  24. Sean D. Kelly, The Purpose of General Education.score: 240.0
    I would like to begin by talking about General Education in America. General Education plays a very particular and interesting role in American Higher Education. A typical undergraduate at one of our colleges or universities is expected to satisfy a range of requirements in his or her major area of study (mathematics, economics, philosophy, etc.); and they will also take a range of electives – courses that are not required for graduation but in which the student might want to explore (...)
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  25. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Phenomenology, Dynamical Neural Networks and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):213-228.score: 240.0
    Current cognitive science models of perception and action assume that the objects that we move toward and perceive are represented as determinate in our experience of them. A proper phenomenology of perception and action, however, shows that we experience objects indeterminately when we are perceiving them or moving toward them. This indeterminacy, as it relates to simple movement and perception, is captured in the proposed phenomenologically based recurrent network models of brain function. These models provide a possible foundation from which (...)
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  26. Sean D. Kelly, A Moment to Reflect Upon Perceptual Synchrony.score: 240.0
    & How does neuronal activity bring about the interpretation of visual space in terms of objects or complex perceptual events? If they group, simple visual features can bring about the integration of spikes from neurons responding to different features to within a few milliseconds. Considered as a potential solution to the ‘‘binding problem,’’ it is suggested that neuronal synchronization is the glue for binding together different features of the same object. This idea receives some support from correlated- and periodic-stimulus motion (...)
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  27. Sean D. Kelly (1999). What Do We See (When We Do)? Philosophical Topics 27 (2):107-28.score: 240.0
    1. The philosophical problem of what we see My topic revolves around what is apparently a very basic question. Stripped of all additions and in its leanest, most economical form, this is the question: "What do we see?" But in this most basic form the question admits of at least three different interpretations. In the first place, one might understand it to be an epistemological question, perhaps one with skeptical overtones. "What do we see?", on this reading, is short for (...)
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  28. Howard D. Kelly (2014). Heidegger the Metaphysician: Modes‐of‐Being and Grundbegriffe. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3).score: 240.0
    Modes-of-being (Seinsarten) figure centrally in Heidegger's masterwork 'Being and Time'. Testimony to this is Heidegger's characterisation of two of his most celebrated enquiries—the Existential analytic and the Zeug analysis—as investigations into the respective modes-of-being of the entities concerned. Yet despite the importance of this concept, commentators disagree widely about what a mode-of-being is. In this paper, I systematically outline and defend a novel and exegetically grounded interpretation of this concept. Strongly opposed to Kantian readings, such as those advocated by Taylor (...)
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  29. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Temporal Awareness. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 240.0
  30. D. Kelly (2000). Book Review: Palliative Care Ethics: A Companion for All Specialities, Second Edition. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 7 (4):370-371.score: 240.0
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  31. J. N. D. Kelly (1971). The Fathers and Ecumenism. Augustinianum 11 (1):21-33.score: 240.0
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  32. D. H. Kelly (1970). What Happened to the Athenians Captured in Sicily? The Classical Review 20 (02):127-131.score: 240.0
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  33. A. D. Kelly (1932). Some Aspects of the "New Logic". Philosophy 7 (28):461 - 467.score: 240.0
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  34. John Adlam, Irwin Gill, Shane N. Glackin, Brendan D. Kelly, Christopher Scanlon & Seamus Mac Suibhne (2013). Perspectives on Erving Goffman's “Asylums” Fifty Years On. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):605-613.score: 240.0
    Erving Goffman’s “Asylums” is a key text in the development of contemporary, community-orientated mental health practice. It has survived as a trenchant critique of the asylum as total institution, and its publication in 1961 in book form marked a further stage in the discrediting of the asylum model of mental health care. In this paper, some responses from a range of disciplines to this text, 50 years on, are presented. A consultant psychiatrist with a special interest in cultural psychiatry and (...)
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  35. Brendan D. Kelly (2012). Brain Imaging in Clinical Psychiatry : Why? In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press. 111.score: 240.0
  36. D. J. Kelly, S. Miellet & R. Caldara (2009). Culture Shapes Eye Movements for Visually Homogeneous Objects. Frontiers in Psychology 1:6-6.score: 240.0
    Culture affects the way people move their eyes to extract information in their visual world. Adults from Eastern societies (e.g., China) display a disposition to process information holistically, whereas individuals from Western societies (e.g., Britain) process information analytically. In terms of face processing, adults from Western cultures typically fixate the eyes and mouth, while adults from Eastern cultures fixate centrally on the nose region, yet face recognition accuracy is comparable across populations. A potential explanation for the observed differences relates to (...)
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  37. Sean D. Kelly (2002). Husserl and Phenomenology. In Robert C. Solomon & D. Sherman (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell. 12--112.score: 240.0
  38. T. D. Kelly & John T. Irwin (1973). The Meaning of Cleanness: Parable as Effective Sign. Mediaeval Studies 35 (1):232-260.score: 240.0
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  39. S. D. Kelly (2010). The Normative Nature of Perceptual Experience. In Bence Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press. 146.score: 240.0
  40. Sean D. Kelly (2002). What Makes Perceptual Content Non-Conceptual? Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy.score: 240.0
    the world. 1 Whereas the content of our beliefs, thoughts, and judgements necessarily involves "conceptualization" or "concept application", the content of our perceptual experiences is, according to Evans, "non-conceptual". Because Evans takes it for granted that we are often able to entertain thoughts about an object in virtue of having perceived it, a central problem in.
     
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  41. Patricia Jagentowicz Mills, Robert D. Walsh, Gary Shapiro, Katharina Dulckeit, George Armstrong Kelly, Merold Westphal, William Desmond, Joseph Fitzer, William Leon McBride & Thomas F. O'Meara (1986). E-Collection. The Owl of Minerva 17 (2).score: 240.0
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  42. Larry D. Benson, V. A. Kolve & H. Ansgar Kelly (2011). Memoirs of Fellows and Corresponding Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America: Charles Muscatine. Speculum 86 (3):857-858.score: 240.0
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  43. Richard J. Bodnar, Dennis D. Kelly, Angela Spiaggia & Murray Glusman (1978). Stress-Induced Analgesia: Adaptation Following Chronic Cold Water Swims. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (6):337-340.score: 240.0
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  44. Richard J. Bodnar, Dennis D. Kelly, Angela Spiaggia, Constantine Pavlides & Murray Glusman (1978). Stress-Induced Analgesia: Effect of Naloxone Following Cold Water Swims. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 12 (2):125-128.score: 240.0
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  45. Richard J. Bodnar, Dennis D. Kelly & Murray Glusman (1978). Stress-Induced Analgesia: Time Course of Pain Reflex Alterations Following Cold Water Swims. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (6):333-336.score: 240.0
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  46. Richard J. Bodnar, Donald Simone, Dennis D. Kelly, Martin Brutus, Murray Glusman & Richard Meibach (1982). Time-Dependent and Dose-Dependent Effects of Fenfluramine Upon Pain Thresholds. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (6):355-358.score: 240.0
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  47. S. T. D. Kelly (2013). Bonhoeffer's “Non Religious” Christianity: Antecedents and Critique. Bijdragen 37 (2):118-148.score: 240.0
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  48. D. Kelly (1998). Book Review: Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 5 (3):272-274.score: 240.0
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  49. D. A. Kelly (1996). Culture in De-Center Court, a Review of China in Transformation, Ed. Tu Wei-Ming, Special Issue, Daedalus 122 (2)(March 1993). [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 46:278-281.score: 240.0
     
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  50. D. J. Kelly (2004). Divided by a Common Language? History of European Ideas 30 (2):241-252.score: 240.0
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