Search results for 'Spiritual exercises History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pierre Hadot (1995). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Spiritual Exercises From Socrates to Foucault. Blackwell.score: 393.0
    This book presents a history of spiritual exercises from Socrates to early Christianity, an account of their decline in modern philosophy, and a discussion of ...
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  2. Rebecca Bradburn Langer (forthcoming). Book Review: Protestant Spiritual Exercises: Theology, History, and Practice. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (1):106-106.score: 261.0
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  3. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2010). Species Extinction and the Vice of Thoughtlessness: The Importance of Spiritual Exercises for Learning Virtue. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):61-83.score: 168.0
    In this paper, I present a sample spiritual exercise—a contemporary form of the written practice that ancient philosophers used to shape their characters. The exercise, which develops the ancient practice of the examination of conscience, is on the sixth mass extinction and seeks to understand why the extinction appears as a moral wrong. It concludes by finding a vice in the moral character of the author and the author’s society. From a methodological standpoint, the purpose of spiritual (...) is to create a habit of thoughtfulness in the writer, and by way of teaching, to suggest one to the reader. Such a habit is important, at least, because virtue is a habit. In other words, there can be no learning of virtue itself without habituation into it. Accordingly, I frame the sample spiritual exercise with a deliberately controversial objection to contemporary academic virtue ethics and with a justification for why the spiritual exercise is important for taking virtue ethically. And I end the paper with some further remarks explaining the form of the exercise and its relevance to doing philosophy. In this way, the paper makes and illustrates a methodological point about virtue ethics based on a meta-ethical assumption about virtue as a habit, and it does this by focusing on a pressing environmental problem in the twenty-first century. (shrink)
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  4. François Renaud (1997). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Spiritual Exercises From Socrates to Foucault,. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4).score: 135.0
  5. François Renaud (1997). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Spiritual Exercises From Socrates to Foucault, And: Qu'est-Ce Que la Philosophie Antique? (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):637-640.score: 135.0
  6. Dennis J. Moberg & Martin Calkins (2001). Reflection in Business Ethics: Insights From St. Ignatius' Spiritual Exercises. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):257 - 270.score: 112.0
    We examine the Spiritual Exercises developed by St. Ignatius Loyola for the purpose of informing the structure of reflection as a tool in business ethics. At present, reflection in business is used to clarify moods, expectations, theories of use, and defining moments. We suggest here that Ignatius' Exercises, which focus on ends, engage the emotions and imagination, use role modeling, and require a response, might be useful as a model for reflection in business.
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  7. Daniel A. Dombowski (2009). Neoclassical Theism and Spiritual Exercises. Process Studies 38 (1):93-107.score: 112.0
    Relying on Pierre Hadot’s concept of philosophy as spiritual exercise, I examine Nikos Kazantzakis’ magnum opus Askitiki: Salvatores Dei (translated in English as The Saviors of God: Spiritual Exercises). Specifically, I examine the extent to which Kazantzakis offers a version of spiritual exercise appropriate for neoclassical theism, analogous to St. Ignatius’ version of spiritual exercise in the service of classical theism.
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  8. Ian Hunter (2002). The Morals of Metaphysics: Kant's 'Groundwork' as Intellectual Paideia. Critical Inquiry 28 (4):908-929.score: 105.0
    To approach philosophy as a way of working on the self means to begin not with the experience it clarifies and the subject it discovers, but with the acts of self‐transformation it requires and the subjectivity it seeks to fashion. Commenting on the variety of spiritual exercises to be found in the ancient schools, Pierre Hadot remarks that: Some, like Plutarch’s ethismoi, designed to curb curiosity, anger or gossip, were only practices intended to ensure good moral habits. Others, (...)
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  9. Robin R. Wang (2007). Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine – by Aaron Stalnaker. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):311–314.score: 84.0
  10. Michael McGuckian (2009). The Dynamism of Desire: Bernard J. F. Lonergan, S. J. On The Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. By James L. Connor. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (3):536-537.score: 84.0
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  11. I. I. I. Kline (2007). Review of Aaron Stalnaker, Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).score: 84.0
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  12. Richard Rorty (2012). Redemption From Egotism: James and Proust as Spiritual Exercises. Telos 1 (6):243-263.score: 84.0
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  13. D. L. Evans (1928). Book Review:Spiritual Exercises and Their Results: An Essay in Psychology and Comparative Religion. Aelfrida Tillyard. [REVIEW] Ethics 38 (4):486-.score: 84.0
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  14. Dominic Cirigliano (1935). The Divine Comedy and the “Spiritual Exercises”. Thought 10 (3):410-436.score: 84.0
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  15. Arnold I. Davidson (1990). Spiritual Exercises and Ancient Philosophy: An Introduction to Pierre Hadot. Critical Inquiry 16 (3):475.score: 84.0
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  16. Patrick Madigan (2010). Loyola's Greater Narrative: The Architecture of the Spiritual Exercises in Golden Age and Enlightenment Literature. By Frédéric Conrod. Heythrop Journal 51 (1):145-146.score: 84.0
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  17. Robert L. McCormack (1927). Spiritual Exercises In A Syllogism. Modern Schoolman 3 (4):55-56.score: 84.0
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  18. John J. Smith (1941). Saint Ignatius Loyola and Prayer as Seen in the Book of the Spiritual Exercises. Thought 16 (4):748-750.score: 84.0
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  19. E. Boday (1989). The Structure of the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola in the Light of the Teaching of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the Election. Divus Thomas 92 (3-4):241-258.score: 84.0
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  20. A. J. Siqueira (1938). The Spirituality of the “Spiritual Exercises” of St. Ignatius. Thought 13 (4):574-588.score: 84.0
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  21. Feliz Molina (2013). Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz. Continent 3 (1):17-24.score: 81.0
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  22. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.score: 80.0
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study (...)
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  23. David Bates (forthcoming). Rediscovering Collingwood's Spiritual History (In and Out of Context). History and Theory.score: 78.0
  24. Paul Richard Blum (2012). Heroic Exercises: Giordano Bruno’s De Gli Eroici Furori as a Response to Ignatius of Loyola’s Exercitia Spiritualia. Brunina and Campanelliana 18:359-373.score: 74.0
  25. Pierre Force (2011). The Teeth of Time: Pierre Hadot on Meaning and Misunderstanding in the History of Ideas1. History and Theory 50 (1):20-40.score: 73.0
    The French philosopher and intellectual historian Pierre Hadot (1922-2010) is known primarily for his conception of philosophy as spiritual exercise, which was an essential reference for the later Foucault. An aspect of his work that has received less attention is a set of methodological reflections on intellectual history and on the relationship between philosophy and history. Hadot was trained initially as a philosopher and was interested in existentialism as well as in the convergence between philosophy and poetry. (...)
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  26. Dana Jalobeanu (2012). Idolatry, Natural History, and Spiritual Medicine: Francis Bacon and the Neo-Stoic Protestantism of the Late Sixteenth Century. Perspectives on Science 20 (2):207-226.score: 72.0
  27. Benedino Gemelli (2012). The History of Life and Death A'Spiritual'History From Invisible Matter to Prolongation of Life. Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):1-2.score: 72.0
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  28. Adrian Coates (1938). Towards the Twentieth Century: Essays in the Spiritual History of the Nineteenth. By H. V. Routh M.A., D.Lit., (Cambridge: At the University Press. 1937. Pp. X + 392. Price 21s.).The False State By Hilda D. Oakeley M.A., D.Lit., (London: Williams & Norgate, Ltd.. 1937. Pp. Xii+211. Price 6s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (49):115-.score: 72.0
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  29. S. L. Greenslade (1947). M. Thomas Aquinas Carroll: The Venerable Bede: His Spiritual Teachings. (Studies in Mediaeval History, New Series, Vol. IX.) Pp. Ix+270. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1946. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (3-4):130-.score: 72.0
  30. Joseph L. Blau & Maurice Wohlgelernter (eds.) (1980). History, Religion, and Spiritual Democracy: Essays in Honor of Joseph L. Blau. Columbia University Press.score: 72.0
  31. John Edmondson, Barbara Horn & James McCall (2002). Book Reviews of –œCritical Times: The History of The Times Literary Supplementâ–, –œThe Copyeditorâ–™s Handbook: A Guide For Book Publishing and Corporate Communications, With Exercises and Answer Keysâ–, and –œThe African Publishing Companion: A Resource Guideâ–. [REVIEW] Logos 13 (3):177-183.score: 72.0
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  32. Dmitri Levitin (2012). The Experimentalist as Humanist: Robert Boyle on the History of Philosophy. Annals of Science:1-34.score: 66.0
    Summary Historians of science have neglected early modern natural philosophers' varied attitudes to the history of philosophy, often preferring to use loose labels such as ?Epicureanism? to describe the survival of ancient doctrines. This is methodologically inappropriate: reifying such philosophical movements tells us little about the complex ways in which early modern natural philosophers approached the history of their own discipline. As this article shows, a central figure of early modern natural philosophy, Robert Boyle, invested great intellectual energy (...)
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  33. Julian Young (2003). The Death of God and the Meaning of Life. Routledge.score: 62.0
    What is the meaning of life? In the post-modern, post-religious scientific world, this question is becoming a preoccupation. But it also has a long history: many major figures in philosophy had something to say on the subject. This book begins with an historical overview of philosophers from Plato to Hegel and Marx who have believed in some sort of meaning of life, either in some supposed "other" world or in the future of this world. Young goes on to look (...)
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  34. Pierre Force (2005). Innovation as Spiritual Exercise: Montaigne and Pascal. Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (1):17-35.score: 61.0
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  35. Konrad Banicki (2014). Philosophy as Therapy: Towards a Conceptual Model. Philosophical Papers 43 (1):7-31.score: 56.0
    The idea of philosophy as a kind of therapy, though by no means standard, has been present in metaphilosophical reflection since antiquity. Diverse versions of it were also discussed and applied by more recent authors such as Wittgenstein, Hadot and Foucault. In order to develop an explicit, general and systematic model of therapeutic philosophy a relatively broad and well-structured account provided by Martha Nussbaum is subjected to analysis. The results obtained, subsequently, form a basis for a new model constructed around (...)
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  36. James D. G. Dunn (1975). Jesus and the Spirit: A Study of the Religious and Charismatic Experience of Jesus and the First Christians as Reflected in the New Testament. S.C.M. Press.score: 56.0
    In this book James D. G. Dunn explores the nature of the religious experiences that were at the forefront of emerging Christianity.
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  37. Jung H. Lee (2013). The Rhetoric Of Context. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):555-584.score: 56.0
    This paper presents a critical appraisal of the recent turn in comparative religious ethics to virtue theory; it argues that the specific aspirations of virtue ethicists to make ethics more contextual, interdisciplinary, and practice-centered has in large measure failed to match the rhetoric. I suggest that the focus on the category of the human and practices associated with self-formation along with a methodology grounded in “analogical imagination” has actually poeticized the subject matter into highly abstract textual studies on normative voices (...)
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  38. Michelantonio Lo Russo (2007). Trasfigurazioni Quotidiane: Elogio Dell'esercizio. Editori Riuniti.score: 56.0
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  39. Anthony Kenny (ed.) (1997). The Oxford Illustrated History of Western Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Written by a team of distinguished scholars, this is an authoritative and comprehensive history of Western philosophy from its earliest beginnings to the present day. Illustrated with over 150 color and black-and-white pictures, chosen to illuminate and complement the text, this lively and readable work is an ideal introduction to philosophy for anyone interested in the history of ideas. From Plato's Republic and St. Augustine's Confessions through Marx's Capital and Sartre's Being and Nothingness, the extraordinary philosophical dialogue between (...)
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  40. Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.score: 54.0
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance (...)
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  41. Akop P. Nazaretyan (2005). Western and Russian Traditions of Big History: A Philosophical Insight. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (1):63 - 80.score: 54.0
    Big History - an integral conception of the past since the Big Bang until today - is a novel subject of cross-disciplinary interest. The concept was construed in the 1980-1990s simultaneously in different countries, after relevant premises had matured in the sciences and humanities. Various versions and traditions of Big History are considered in the article. Particularly, most of the Western authors emphasize the idea of equilibrium, and thus reduce cosmic, biological, and social evolution to the mass-energy processes; (...)
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  42. Nikolaĭ Berdi͡aev (2009/1962). The Meaning of History. Semantron Press.score: 54.0
    Translator's note -- Foreword by Boris Jakim -- On the essence of the historical : the meaning of tradition -- On the nature of the historical : the metaphysical and the historical -- Of celestial history : god and man -- Of celestial history : time and eternity -- The destiny of the Jews -- Christianity and history -- The Renaissance and humanism -- The end of the Renaissance and the crisis of humanism : the advent of (...)
     
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  43. Anthony Kenny (ed.) (1994). The Oxford History of Western Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    From Plato's Republic and St. Augustine's Confessions through Marx's Capital and Sartre's Being and Nothingness, the extraordinary philosophical dialogue between great Western minds has flourished unabated through the ages. Dazzling in its genius and breadth, the long line of European and American intellectual discourse tells a remarkable story--a quest for truth and wisdom that continues to shape our most basic ideas about human nature and the world around us. That quest is brilliantly brought to life in The Oxford History (...)
     
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  44. Nicholas Mowad (2012). History and Critique: A Response to Habermas's Misreading of Hegel. Clio 42 (1):53-72.score: 54.0
    Habermas has alleged: (1) that Hegel has given a social theory that is abstract and technical, separating theory from practice ; and (2) that the criticism Hegel exercises at times is compromised by his uncritical acceptance of modern western culture. Both allegations amount to the claim that in some way Hegel proscribes internal critique, a citizen’s critique of her own nation-state. However, this charge is based on a misunderstanding of the role that history plays in Hegel’s account, and (...)
     
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  45. John H. Morgan (2012). The Free Quakers Reaffirming the Legacy of Conscience and Liberty (The Spiritual Journey of a Solitary People). Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (32):288-305.score: 51.0
    The following exploration of the fundamentals of the Religious Society of Friends called Quakers will focus upon a lesser known tradition of the Quakers, namely that of the "Free Friends of Philadelphia" and their modern progeny, the Free Quakers of Indiana These Free Quakers, as they are called, are those who chose to exercise their free right to follow their conscience in all things, a tradition reaching back to the 18 th century in Philadelphia when a contingent of Friends chose (...)
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  46. Philip Clayton (2014). The Fruits of Pluralism: A Vision for the Next Seven Years in Religion/Science. Zygon 49 (2):430-442.score: 48.0
    This article offers a vision for work at the intersection of science and religion over the coming seven years. Because predictions are inherently risky and are more often than not false, the text first offers an assessment of the current state of the science-religion discussion and a quick survey of the last 50 years of work in this field. The implications of the six features of this vision for the future of the field are then presented in some detail. Rather (...)
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  47. Måns Broo (2003). As Good as God: The Guru in Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism. Åbo Akademi University Press.score: 48.0
     
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  48. Basil J. deSilva (2008). Our Mentality Through the Ages, and Then to Nibbana: The Path of Evolution. Main Distributors, Buddhist Cultural Centre.score: 48.0
  49. Carrie B. Dohe (2011). Wotan and the 'Archetypal Ergriffenheit': Mystical Union, National Spiritual Rebirth and Culture-Creating Capacity in CG Jung's 'Wotan'essay. History of European Ideas 37 (3):344-356.score: 48.0
    (2011). Wotan and the ‘archetypal Ergriffenheit’: Mystical union, national spiritual rebirth and culture-creating capacity in C. G. Jung's ‘Wotan’ essay. History of European Ideas: Vol. 37, No. 3, pp. 344-356.
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  50. Tayebe Jafary & Morteza Hashemi (2012). Analyzing the Prophet Mohammad's Symbolic Horse in His Spiritual Ascension. Asian Culture and History 5 (1):p74.score: 48.0
    Beginning from the ancient times human has always valued the historical individuals and events and by exaggerating their features and circumstances have created mythical and audacious characters and phenomena. In the history of Islam the same is true regarding the Prophet Mohammad in its unique manner, that accounts for his spiritual ascension and a mythic horse named Boraq. The wonder of the ascension somehow highlighted the other events of in the Prophet Mohammad's life and since "horse" has been (...)
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