Search results for 'Stacey Irwin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stacey Irwin (2005). Technological Other/Quasi Other: Reflection on Lived Experience. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (4):453 - 467.score: 240.0
    This reflection focuses on lived experience with the Technological Other (Quasi-Other) while pursuing creative video and film activities. In the last decade work in the video and film industries has been transformed through digital manipulation and enhancement brought about by increasingly sophisticated computer technologies. The rules of the craft have not changed but the relationship the artist/editor experiences with these new digital tools has brought about increasingly interesting existential experiences in the creative process. How might this new way of being (...)
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  2. Stacey O. Irwin (forthcoming). Technological Reciprocity with a Cell Phone in Advance. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology.score: 240.0
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  3. Terence Irwin (1988). Aristotle's First Principles. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Exploring Aristotle's philosophical method and the merits of his conclusions, Irwin here shows how Aristotle defends dialectic against the objection that it cannot justify a metaphysical realist's claims. He focuses particularly on Aristotle's metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics, stressing the connections between doctrines that are often discussed separately.
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  4. Terence Irwin (2009). The Development of Ethics: A Historical and Critical Study. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
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  5. Terence Irwin (1995). Plato's Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This exceptional book examines and explains Plato's answer to the normative question, "How ought we to live?" It discusses Plato's conception of the virtues; his views about the connection between the virtues and happiness; and the account of reason, desire, and motivation that underlies his arguments about the virtues. Plato's answer to the epistemological question, "How can we know how we ought to live?" is also discussed. His views on knowledge, belief, and inquiry, and his theory of Forms, are examined, (...)
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  6. Alan Irwin (1995). Citizen Science: A Study of People, Expertise, and Sustainable Development. Routledge.score: 60.0
    We are all concerned by the environmental threats facing us today. Environmental issues are a major area of concern for policy makers, industrialists and public groups of many different kinds. While science seems central to our understanding of such threats, the statements of scientists are increasingly open to challenge in this area. Meanwhile, citizens may find themselves labelled as "ignorant" in environmental matters. In Citizen Science Alan Irwin provides a much needed route through the fraught relationship between science, the (...)
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  7. Terence Irwin (1989). Classical Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Covering over 1000 years of classical philosophy from Homer to Saint Augustine, this accessible, comprehensive study details the major philosophies and philosophers of the period--the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Neoplatonism. Though the emphasis is on questions of philosophical interest, particularly ethics, the theory of knowledge, philosophy of mind, and philosophical theology, Irwin includes discussions of the literary and historical background to classical philosophy as well as the work of other important thinkers--Greek tragedians, historians, medical writers, and (...)
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  8. Terence Irwin (ed.) (1999). Classical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This Oxford Reader seeks to introduce some of the main philosophical questions raised by the Greek and Roman philosophers of classical antiquity. Selections from the writings of ancient philosophers are interspersed with Terence Irwin's incisive commentary, and sometimes with contributions from modern philosophers expounding relevant philosophical positions or discussing particular aspects of classical philosophy. The arrangement of the book is thematic, rather than chronological, allowing the reader to focus on philosophical problems and ideas, but a general introduction places philosophers (...)
     
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  9. Terence Irwin (2008). The Development of Ethics: Volume 2: From Suarez to Rousseau. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Development of Ethics is a selective historical and critical study of moral philosophy in the Socratic tradition, with special attention to Aristotelian naturalism. It discusses the main topics of moral philosophy as they have developed historically, including: the human good, human nature, justice, friendship, and morality; the methods of moral inquiry; the virtues and their connexions; will, freedom, and responsibility; reason and emotion; relativism, subjectivism, and realism; the theological aspect of morality. This volume examines early modern moral philosophy from (...)
     
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  10. Terence Irwin (2007). The Development of Ethics: Volume 1: From Socrates to the Reformation. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
     
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  11. Terence Irwin (2011). The Development of Ethics: Three Volume Set. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Development of Ethics is a selective historical and critical study of moral philosophy in the Socratic tradition, with special attention to Aristotelian naturalism, its formation, elaboration, criticism, and defence. This three-volume set discusses the main topics of moral philosophy as they have developed historically, including: the human good, human nature, justice, friendship, and morality; the methods of moral inquiry; the virtues and their connexions; will, freedom, and responsibility; reason and emotion; relativism, subjectivism, and realism; the theological aspect of morality. (...)
     
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  12. C. J. Rowe, Plato & T. Irwin (1982/2008). Gorgias. Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:249.score: 60.0
    The Gorgias is a vivid introduction to the central problems of moral and political philosophy. In the notes to his translation, Professor Irwin discusses the historical and social context of the dialogue, expounds and criticises the arguments, and tries above all to suggest the questions a modern reader ought to raise about Plato's doctrines. No knowledge of Greek is necessary.
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  13. William Irwin (2004). Against Intertextuality. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):227-242.score: 30.0
    : Julia Kristeva coined the term intertextuality in 1966, and since that time intertextuality has come to have almost as many meanings as users. No small task, I clarify what intertextuality means for Kristeva and her mentor/colleague, Roland Barthes before criticizing their concept of intertextuality and its application in interpretation. Because no rational and coherent concept of intertextuality is offered by Kristeva, Barthes, or their Epigoni, I conclude that intertextuality should be stricken from the lexicon of sincere and intelligent humanists.
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  14. T. H. Irwin (1975). Aristotle on Reason, Desire, and Virtue. Journal of Philosophy 72 (17):567-578.score: 30.0
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  15. T. H. Irwin (1977). Plato's Heracleiteanism. Philosophical Quarterly 27 (106):1-13.score: 30.0
  16. William Irwin (2001). What is an Allusion? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (3):287–297.score: 30.0
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  17. T. H. Irwin (1992). Who Discovered the Will? Philosophical Perspectives 6:453-473.score: 30.0
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  18. T. H. Irwin (2011). Continuity in the History of Autonomy. Inquiry 54 (5):442 - 459.score: 30.0
    Abstract Six apparent features of Kant's conception of autonomy appear to differentiate it sharply from anything that we can find in an Aristotelian conception of will and practical reason. (1) Autonomy requires a role for practical reason independent of its instrumental role in relation to non-rational desires. (2) This role belongs to the rational will. (3) This role consists in the rational will's being guided by its own law. (4) This guidance by the law of the will itself requires acts (...)
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  19. T. H. Irwin (1981). Homonymy in Aristotle. Review of Metaphysics 34 (3):523 - 544.score: 30.0
  20. T. H. Irwin (1978). First Principles in Aristotle's Ethics. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):252-272.score: 30.0
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  21. Terence Irwin (2001). Vice and Reason. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):73-97.score: 30.0
    Aristotle''s account of vice presents a puzzle: (1) Viciouspeople must be guided by reason, since they act on decision(prohairesis), not on their non-rational desires. (2) And yet theycannot be guided by reason, since they are said to pay attention totheir non-rational part and not to live in accordance with reason. Wecan understand the conception of vice the reconciles these two claims,once we examine Aristotle''s account of (a) the pursuit of the fine andof the expedient; (b) the connexion between vice and (...)
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  22. W. T. Irwin (2002). The Aesthetics of Allusion. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):521-532.score: 30.0
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  23. T. H. Irwin (1991). The Structure of Aristotelian Happiness:Aristotle on the Human Good. Richard Kraut. Ethics 101 (2):382-.score: 30.0
  24. William Irwin (2009). Reading Audio Books. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 358-368.score: 30.0
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  25. T. H. Irwin (2008). The Threefold Cord: Reconciling Strategies in Moral Theory. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1part2):121-133.score: 30.0
    Eighteenth-century disputes in moral theory seem to offer an opportunity to scepticism about moral theory and about morality. Twentieth-century theorists have tried to forestall a sceptical argument from disagreement in moral theory to doubts about morality, by appeal to a division between first-order and second-order questions. This division, however, does not answer the sceptical argument. A better reply appears in Butler's treatment of disagreement through his strategies of consensus and comprehension. These strategies are illustrated by his discussion of utilitarianism and (...)
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  26. T. H. Irwin (1994). Happiness, Virtue, and Morality:The Morality of Happiness. Julia Annas. Ethics 105 (1):153-.score: 30.0
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  27. Jones Irwin (2010). Derrida and the Writing of the Body. Ashgate.score: 30.0
    Derrida, Artaud, and the "writing of the body" -- "Except for a certain laughter" : Derrida, Bataille, and the transgression of dialectic -- From the "outwork" to "Plato's pharmacy" : on Derrida, Plato and, Pickstock -- Mallarmé after Plato : on Derrida and "la double séance" -- What if truth were a woman on spurs : Nietzsche's styles -- On Derrida and feminism -- Re-politicising deconstruction : from "the old mole" to cosmopolitanism to an economic forgiveness.
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  28. T. H. Irwin (1995). Prudence and Morality in Greek Ethics. Ethics 105 (2):284-295.score: 30.0
    Focuses on the traditional view of Greek ethics. Response to articles by Julia Annas and Nicholas White about the interpretation of Greek ethics; Plato's concept of happiness based on his book `Republic'; Issues about prudential and moral reasoning.
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  29. T. H. Irwin (1989). Some Rational Aspects of Incontinence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):49-88.score: 30.0
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  30. T. H. Irwin (2007). A 'Fundamental Misunderstanding'? Utilitas 19 (1):78-90.score: 30.0
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  31. T. H. Irwin (1987). Ways to First Principles: Aristotle's Methods of Discovery. Philosophical Topics 15 (2):109-134.score: 30.0
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  32. Terence Irwin (1977/1979). Plato's Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  33. T. H. Irwin (1996). Stoic Individuals. Philosophical Perspectives 10:459 - 480.score: 30.0
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  34. Alan Irwin & Brian Wynne (eds.) (1996). Misunderstanding Science?: The Public Reconstruction of Science and Technology. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Misunderstanding Science? offers a challenging new perspective on the public understanding of science. In so doing, it also challenges existing ideas of the nature of science and its relationships with society. Its analysis and case presentation are highly relevant to current concerns over the uptake, authority, and effectiveness of science as expressed, for example, in areas such as education, medical/health practice, risk and the environment, technological innovation. Based on several in-depth case-studies, and informed theoretically by the sociology of scientific knowledge, (...)
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  35. Terence Irwin (1974). Recollection and Plato's Moral Theory. Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):752 - 772.score: 30.0
  36. T. H. Irwin (2003). Augustine's Criticisms of the Stoic Theory of Passions. Faith and Philosophy 20 (4):430-447.score: 30.0
    Augustine defends three claims about the passions: (1) The Stoic position differs only verbally from the Platonic-Aristotelian position. (2) The Stoic positionis wrong and the Platonic-Aristotelian position is right. (3) The will is engaged in the different passions; indeed the different passions are different expressionsof the will. The first two claims, properly understood, are defensible. But the most plausible versions of them give us good reason to doubt the third claim.
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  37. David Baggett, Shawn E. Klein & William Irwin (eds.) (2004). Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts. Chicago: Open Court.score: 30.0
    Urging readers of the Harry Potter series to dig deeper than wizards, boggarts, and dementors, the authors of this unique guide collect the musings of seventeen ...
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  38. Sarah Franklin, Celia Lury & Jackie Stacey (eds.) (1991). Off-Centre: Feminism and Cultural Studies. Harpercollins Academic.score: 30.0
    This indispensible collection brings together feminist theory and cultural studies, looking at issues such as pop culture and the media, science and technology, ...
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  39. Kristen Irwin (2013). Bayle on the (Ir)Rationality of Religious Belief. Philosophy Compass 8 (6):560-569.score: 30.0
    Bayle's conception of reason is notoriously difficult to unravel, as are its consequences for the rationality of religious belief. The secondary literature has generally coalesced around two interpretations of Bayle's conception of reason. The “superskeptical” interpretation holds that reason is the source of its own undoing, not to be trusted; religious belief turns out to be irrational on this conception of reason, but this is hardly cause for alarm. The jusqu'au bout (to the very end) interpretation holds that reason is (...)
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  40. T. H. Irwin (1987). Generosity and Property in Aristotle's Politics. Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (02):37-.score: 30.0
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  41. T. H. Irwin (1989). Tradition and Reason in the History of Ethics. Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (01):45-.score: 30.0
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  42. T. H. Irwin (1986). Aristotelian Actions. [REVIEW] Phronesis 31 (1):68-89.score: 30.0
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  43. William Irwin & David Kyle Johnson (eds.) (2010). Introducing Philosophy Through Pop Culture: From Socrates to South Park, Hume to House. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    Introducing Philosophy Through Pop Culture uses popular culture to illustrate important philosophical concepts and the work of the major philosophers.
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  44. T. H. Irwin (2004). Aristotle on Meaning and Essence. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):95-105.score: 30.0
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  45. Ralph Stacey (2000). The Emergence of Knowledge in Organization. Emergence 2 (4):23-39.score: 30.0
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  46. Ralph Stacey (2005). Affects and Cognition in a Social Theory of Unconscious Processes. Group Analysis 38 (1):159-176.score: 30.0
  47. T. H. Irwin (1986). Socratic Inquiry and Politics:Socrates and the State. Richard Kraut; Times Literary Supplement. Gregory Vlastos. Ethics 96 (2):400-.score: 30.0
  48. T. H. Irwin (1977). Aristotle's Discovery of Metaphysics. Review of Metaphysics 31 (2):210 - 229.score: 30.0
  49. Ruth Irwin (2003). Heidegger and Nietzsche; the Question of Value and Nihilism in Relation to Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):227-244.score: 30.0
    This paper is a philosophical analysis ofHeidegger and Nietzsche's approach tometaphysics and the associated problem ofnihilism. Heidegger sums up the history ofWestern metaphysics in a way which challengescommon sense approaches to values education.Through close attention to language, Heideggerargues that Nietzsche inverts thePlatonic-Christian tradition but retains theanthropocentric imposition of ‘values’. Ihave used Nietzsche's theory to suggest aslightly different definition of metaphysicsand nihilism which draws attention to theontological parameters of human truths as astruggle between competing sets of conflictingor contradictory values (perspectives) thatopens (...)
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  50. T. H. Irwin (1999). Splendid Vices? Augustine For and Against Pagan Virtues. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (2):105-127.score: 30.0
    Augustine is notorious for his claim that the so-called virtues of pagans are not genuine virtues at all. Bayle refers to this claim when he describes the sort of virtue that one ought to be willing to attribute to atheists.
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