Search results for 'Stan Williamson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Robert E. Stevens, O. Jeff Harris & Stan Williamson (1993). A Comparison of Ethical Evaluations of Business School Faculty and Students: A Pilot Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):611 - 619.
    This paper reports the results of a pilot study of differences in ethical evaluations between business faculty and students at a Southern university. Data were collected from 137 business students (46 freshmen and 67 seniors) and 34 business faculty members. Significant differences were found in 7 of the 30 situations between freshmen and faculty and four situations between seniors and faculty. When the combined means for each group were tested, there was no significant difference in the means at the 0.05 (...)
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  2. Timothy Williamson & Paal Antonsen (2010). Modality & Other Matters: An Interview with Timothy Williamson. Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):16-29.
    An interview with Timothy Williamson on Modality and other matters. Williams is asked three main questions: the first about the difference between philosophical and non-philosophical knowledge, the second concerns the epistemology of modality, and the third is on the emerging metaphysical picture.
     
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  3. Timothy Williamson (2009). The Philosophy of Philosophy • by Timothy Williamson • Blackwell, 2007. X + 332 Pp. £ 15.99 Paper: Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (1):99-100.
    The book is primarily an essay on the epistemology of the sort of armchair knowledge that we can hope to achieve in philosophy. The possibility of such knowledge is not to be explained by reinterpreting philosophical questions as questions about words or concepts. Although there are philosophical questions about words and concepts, most philosophical questions are not about words or concepts: they are, just as they seem to be, about the things, many of them independent of us, to which the (...)
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  4. Timothy Williamson (2011). Williamson's Philosophy of Philosophy Reply. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):534-542.
  5.  16
    Timothy Williamson, B. O. Chen & Koji Nakatogawa (2009). Thinking Deeply, Contributing Originally: An Interview with Timothy Williamson (Special Contribution). Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 18:57-87.
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  6. Timothy Williamson (2011). Williamson on the A Priori and the Analytic Reply. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):498-506.
     
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  7. Timothy Williamson (2003). II—Timothy Williamson: Understanding and Inference. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):249-293.
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  8.  33
    Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (2012). EnviroGenomarkers: The Interplay Between Mechanisms and Difference Making in Establishing Causal Claims. Medicine Studies 3 (4):249-262.
    According to Russo and Williamson :157–170, 2007, Hist Philos Life Sci 33:389–396, 2011a, Philos Sci 1:47–69, 2011b), in order to establish a causal claim of the form, ‘C is a cause of E’, one typically needs evidence that there is an underlying mechanism between C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This thesis has been used to argue that hierarchies of evidence, as championed by evidence-based movements, tend to give primacy to evidence (...)
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  9. Timothy Williamson (2007). The Philosophy of Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    The second volume in the Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
     
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  10.  48
    Timothy Williamson (2013). Modal Logic as Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Williamson gives an original and provocative treatment of deep metaphysical questions about existence, contingency, and change, using the latest resources of quantified modal logic. Contrary to the widespread assumption that logic and metaphysics are disjoint, he argues that modal logic provides a structural core for metaphysics.
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  11. Timothy Williamson (1994). Vagueness. Routledge.
    Vagueness provides the first comprehensive examination of a topic of increasing importance in metaphysics and the philosophy of logic and language. Timothy Williamson traces the history of this philosophical problem from discussions of the heap paradox in classical Greece to modern formal approaches such as fuzzy logic. He illustrates the problems with views which have taken the position that standard logic and formal semantics do not apply to vague language, and defends the controversial realistic view that vagueness is a (...)
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  12. Timothy Williamson (2010). The Philosophy of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The second volume in the _Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy_, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
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  13. Timothy Williamson (2000). Knowledge and its Limits. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'An outstanding contribution to analytic epistemology... original and ingenius arguments... Knowledge and its Limits has raised the standards of epistemological discussion to a higher level.' -Grazer Philosophische Studien 'Radical and challenging... without question an important exercise of the 'let me show you a new way of looking at things' kind; something we sorely need in epistemology.' -Frank Jackson, Australasian Journal of Philosophy 'The best book in epistemology to come out since 1975.' -Keith DeRose, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (...)
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  14. Timothy Williamson (2008). The Philosophy of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The second volume in the _Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy_, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
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  15.  26
    Timothy Williamson (1990). Identity and Discrimination. Blackwell.
    _Identity and Discrimination_, originally published in 1990 and the first book by respected philosopher Timothy Williamson, is now reissued and updated with the inclusion of significant new material. Williamson here proposes an original and rigorous theory linking identity, a relation central to metaphysics, and indiscriminability, a relation central to epistemology.__ Updated and reissued edition of Williamson’s first publication, with the inclusion of significant new material Argues for an original cognitive account of the relation between identity and discrimination (...)
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  16.  20
    Timothy Williamson (2003). Blind Reasoning. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):249-293.
    [Paul Boghossian] The paper asks under what conditions deductive reasoning transmits justification from its premises to its conclusion. It argues that both standard externalist and standard internalist accounts of this phenomenon fail. The nature of this failure is taken to indicate the way forward: basic forms of deductive reasoning must justify by being instances of ’blind but blameless’ reasoning. Finally, the paper explores the suggestion that an inferentialist account of the logical constants can help explain how such reasoning is possible. (...)
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  17.  7
    Timothy Williamson (2005). Replies to Commentators. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):468-491.
    The core of Tony Brueckner’s critique in ‘Knowledge, Evidence, and Skepticism according to Williamson’ is his claim in section 5 that my account of perceptual knowledge has an unacceptable consequence. My reply will concentrate on that claim and largely ignore the rest of Brueckner’s interesting discussion, for it is easy to check that the claim is essential to Brueckner’s argument against my analysis of skepticism and evidence.
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  18. Timothy Williamson (1997). Reply to Commentators. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):945-953.
    The core of Tony Brueckner’s critique in ‘Knowledge, Evidence, and Skepticism according to Williamson’ is his claim in section 5 that my account of perceptual knowledge has an unacceptable consequence. My reply will concentrate on that claim and largely ignore the rest of Brueckner’s interesting discussion, for it is easy to check that the claim is essential to Brueckner’s argument against my analysis of skepticism and evidence. The alleged consequence at issue concerns a case in which Brueckner knows by (...)
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  19.  64
    Timothy Williamson (2005). Replies to Commentators. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):468–491.
    The core of Tony Brueckner’s critique in ‘Knowledge, Evidence, and Skepticism according to Williamson’ is his claim in section 5 that my account of perceptual knowledge has an unacceptable consequence. My reply will concentrate on that claim and largely ignore the rest of Brueckner’s interesting discussion, for it is easy to check that the claim is essential to Brueckner’s argument against my analysis of skepticism and evidence.
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  20.  88
    Timothy Williamson (2000). The Necessary Framework of Objects. Topoi 19 (2):201-208.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but the original publication is available at springerlink.com . Citation: Williamson, T. . 'The necessary framework of objects', Topoi 19, 201-208. N.B. Tim Williamson is now based at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford.
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  21.  69
    Timothy Williamson (1985). Converse Relations. Philosophical Review 94 (2):249-262.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but you may be able to access the article via the publisher copy link on this record page. N.B. Prof Williamson is now based at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford.
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  22. Timothy Williamson (2008). The Philosophy of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The second volume in the _Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy_, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
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  23.  69
    George Darby & Jon Williamson (2011). Imaging Technology and the Philosophy of Causality. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):115-136.
    Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007) put forward the thesis that, at least in the health sciences, to establish the claim that C is a cause of E, one normally needs evidence of an underlying mechanism linking C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This epistemological thesis poses a problem for most current analyses of causality which, in virtue of analysing causality in terms of just one of mechanisms or (...)
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  24.  4
    Timothy Williamson, Joseph Almog & Paolo Leonardi, Reference, Inference and the Semantics of Pejoratives.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Reference, inference and the semantics of pejoratives. In: Almog, J. & Leonardi, P. The Philosophy of David Kaplan. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 137-158.
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  25.  46
    Timothy Williamson (1997). Imagination, Stipulation and Vagueness. Philosophical Issues 8:215-228.
    Russian translation of Williamson T. Imagination, Stipulation and Vagueness // Philosophical Issues, 8, 1997. Translated by Alisa Veruk, Nina Zubkova with kind permission of the author.
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  26.  3
    Timothy Williamson & John Greco, Sosa on Abilities, Concepts, and Externalism.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Sosa on abilities, concepts, and externalism. In: Greco, J. Ernest Sosa and his critics. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.263-271.
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  27.  88
    Timothy Williamson (1988). The Contingent A Priori: A Reply. Analysis 48 (4):218 - 221.
    In 'Reference and Contingency', Monist 62 pp. 161-89, Gareth Evans tried to explain how a priori knowledge of contingent truths is possible by arguing that indexical features of the truths in question make them contingent only in a superficial sense. In 'The Contingent A Priori: Has it Anything to do with Indexicals?', ANALYSIS 46.3, June 1986, pp. 113-7, I suggested that his explanation is inadequate, since a priori knowledge is also possible of deeply contingent truths with no relevant indexical features. (...)
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  28.  86
    Timothy Williamson (2009). Knowledge of Counterfactuals. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (64):45-.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T. . Knowledge of counterfactuals. In: O'Hear, A. Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 45-64.
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  29.  76
    Jon Williamson, From Bayesian Epistemology to Inductive Logic.
    Inductive logic admits a variety of semantics (Haenni et al., 2011, Part 1). This paper develops semantics based on the norms of Bayesian epistemology (Williamson, 2010, Chapter 7). §1 introduces the semantics and then, in §2, the paper explores methods for drawing inferences in the resulting logic and compares the methods of this paper with the methods of Barnett and Paris (2008). §3 then evaluates this Bayesian inductive logic in the light of four traditional critiques of inductive logic, arguing (...)
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  30.  3
    Timothy Williamson (2002). Necessary Existents. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:233-251.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Necessary existents. In: O'Hear, A. Logic, thought and language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 233-251.
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  31.  94
    Timothy Williamson (1999). Logic and Existence. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):181–203.
    [Ian Rumfitt] Frege's logicism in the philosophy of arithmetic consisted, au fond, in the claim that in justifying basic arithmetical axioms a thinker need appeal only to methods and principles which he already needs to appeal in order to justify paradigmatically logical truths and paradigmatically logical forms of inference. Using ideas of Gentzen to spell out what these methods and principles might include, I sketch a strategy for vindicating this logicist claim for the special case of the arithmetic of the (...)
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  32.  2
    Timothy Williamson, Assertion, Denial and Some Cancellation Rules in Modal Logic.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but the original publication is available at springerlink.com. N.B. Timothy Williamson is now based at the Philosophy Faculty, University of Oxford.
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  33.  2
    Timothy Williamson & Anthony O'Hear (2009). Knowledge of Counterfactuals. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 64:45-64.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Knowledge of counterfactuals. In: O'Hear, A. Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 45-64.
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  34.  2
    Timothy Williamson & Anthony O'Hear (2002). Necessary Existents. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:233-251.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Necessary existents. In: O'Hear, A. Logic, thought and language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 233-251.
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  35. Timothy Williamson (2008). The Philosophy of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The second volume in the _Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy_, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
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  36.  9
    Timothy Williamson (1995). Does Assertibility Satisfy the S4 Axiom? Critica 27 (81):3 - 25.
    N. B. Prof Williamson is now based at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford.
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  37.  2
    Timothy Williamson (2009). Knowledge of Counterfactuals. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 64:45-64.
    The full-text of this book chapter is not available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T.. Knowledge of counterfactuals. In: O'Hear, A. Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 45-64.
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  38.  5
    T. Williamson (1996). Wright on the Epistemic Conception of Vagueness. Analysis 56 (1):39-45.
    According to the epistemic conception of vagueness defended in Williamson 1994, what we use vague terms to say is true or false, but in borderline cases we cannot know which. Our grasp of what we say does not open its truth-value to our view. Crispin Wright 1995 offers a lively critique of this conception. A reply may help to clarify the issues.
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  39. George S. Williamson (2004). The Longing for Myth in Germany: Religion and Aesthetic Culture From Romanticism to Nietzsche. University of Chicago Press.
    Since the dawn of Romanticism, artists and intellectuals in Germany have maintained an abiding interest in the gods and myths of antiquity while calling for a new mythology suitable to the modern age. In this study, George S. Williamson examines the factors that gave rise to this distinct and profound longing for myth. In doing so, he demonstrates the entanglement of aesthetic and philosophical ambitions in Germany with some of the major religious conflicts of the nineteenth century. Through readings (...)
     
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  40.  22
    Timothy Williamson (forthcoming). In Memoriam: Ruth Barcan Marcus 1921-2012. Association for Symbolic Logic: The Bulletin of Symbolic Logic.
    Timothy Williamson The Bulletin of Symbolic Logic, Volume 19, Issue 1, Page 123-126, March 2013.
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  41. Timothy Williamson (2009). Reply to Goldman. In Duncan Pritchard & Patrick Greenough (eds.), Williamson on Knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press 305--312.
     
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  42.  1
    Timothy Williamson, The Necessary Framework of Objects.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but the original publication is available at springerlink.com. Citation: Williamson, T.. 'The necessary framework of objects', Topoi 19, 201-208. N.B. Tim Williamson is now based at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford.
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  43.  1
    Timothy Williamson, Verification, Falsification and Cancellation in KT.
    The main result of this paper is that KT is closed under a cancellation principle. This result extends to KTG1, but it does not extend to modal systems associated with the provability interpretation of L, such as KW and KT4Grz. Following Williamson, these results are applied to philosophical concerns about the proper form for theories of meaning, via the interpretation of L as some kind of veriflability. The cancellation principle can then be read as saying that verifilability conditions and (...)
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  44.  36
    Jon Williamson (2011). Imaging Technology and the Philosophy of Causality. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):115-136.
    Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007) put forward the thesis that, at least in the health sciences, to establish the claim that C is a cause of E, one normally needs evidence of an underlying mechanism linking C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This epistemological thesis poses a problem for most current analyses of causality which, in virtue of analysing causality in terms of just one of mechanisms or (...)
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  45.  38
    Timothy Williamson (1988). Assertion, Denial and Some Cancellation Rules in Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 17 (3):299--318.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but the original publication is available at springerlink.com . N.B. Timothy Williamson is now based at the Philosophy Faculty, University of Oxford.
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  46.  14
    Timothy Williamson (1990). Verification, Falsification, and Cancellation in ${\Rm KT}$. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 31 (2):286-290.
    The main result of this paper is that KT is closed under a cancellation principle . This result extends to KTG1, but it does not extend to modal systems associated with the provability interpretation of L, such as KW and KT4Grz . Following Williamson, these results are applied to philosophical concerns about the proper form for theories of meaning, via the interpretation of L as some kind of veriflability. The cancellation principle can then be read as saying that verifilability (...)
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  47. Jon Williamson, Special Issue on Combining Probability and Logic Introduction.
    This volume arose out of an international, interdisciplinary academic network on Probabilistic Logic and Probabilistic Networks involving four of us (Haenni, Romeijn, Wheeler and Williamson), called Progicnet and funded by the Leverhulme Trust from 2006–8. Many of the papers in this volume were presented at an associated conference, the Third Workshop on Combining Probability and Logic (Progic 2007), held at the University of Kent on 5–7 September 2007. The papers in this volume concern either the special focus on the (...)
     
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  48. Ronald Williamson (1989). Jews in the Hellenistic World: Philo. Cambridge University Press.
    An extremely important Jewish writer and thinker of the first century AD, Philo of Alexandria exercised through his ideas and language a lasting influence on the development and growth of Christianity in the New Testament period and later. This book provides an introduction to the major themes and ideas in the religious and philosophical thinking of Philo and outlines the importance of his thought by means of introductory treatments and sections of freshly translated text and commentary. Dr Williamson illustrates (...)
     
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  49. Philippe Aghion & Jeffrey G. Williamson (1999). Growth, Inequality, and Globalization: Theory, History, and Policy. Cambridge University Press.
    The question of how inequality is generated and how it reproduces over time has been a major concern for social scientists for more than a century. Yet the relationship between inequality and the process of economic development is far from being well understood. These Raffaele Mattioli Lectures have brought together two of the world's leading economists, Professors Philippe Aghion and Jeffrey Williamson, to question the conventional wisdom on inequality and growth, and address its inability to explain recent economic experience. (...)
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  50. Timothy Williamson & Robert J. Stainton, Can Cognition Be Factorised Into Internal and External Components?
    This book chapter is not currently available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T. Can cognition be factorised into internal and external components? In: Stainton, R. Contemporary debates in cognitive science. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 291-306.
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