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  1.  44
    Stanley Cavell (1979). The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy. Oxford University Press.
    This reissue of an American philosophical classic includes a new preface by Cavell, in which he discusses the work's reception and influence. The work fosters a fascinating relationship between philosophy and literature both by augmenting his philosophical discussions with examples from literature and by applying philosophical theories to literary texts. Cavell also succeeds in drawing some very important parallels between the British analytic tradition and the continental tradition, by comparing skepticism as understood in Descartes, Hume, and Kant with philosophy of (...)
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  2.  33
    Stanley Cavell (2004). Cities of Words: Pedagogical Letters on a Register of the Moral Life. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    This book offers philosophy in the key of life.
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  3. Stanley Cavell, Cora Diamond, John McDowell, Ian Hacking & Cary Wolfe (2008). Philosophy and Animal Life. Columbia University Press.
    _Philosophy and Animal Life_ offers a new way of thinking about animal rights, our obligation to animals, and the nature of philosophy itself. Cora Diamond begins with "The Difficulty of Reality and the Difficulty of Philosophy," in which she accuses analytical philosophy of evading, or deflecting, the responsibility of human beings toward nonhuman animals. Diamond then explores the animal question as it is bound up with the more general problem of philosophical skepticism. Focusing specifically on J. M. Coetzee's _The Lives (...)
     
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  4.  7
    Stanley Cavell (1990). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome the Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism. University of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two traditions of English and German philosophy shun one another; where the cultures of America and Europe unsettle one another.
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  5.  39
    Stanley Cavell (2005). Philosophy the Day After Tomorrow. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    Something out of the ordinary -- The interminable Shakespearean text -- Fred Astaire asserts the right to praise -- Henry James returns to America and to Shakespeare -- Philosophy the day after tomorrow -- What is the scandal of skepticism? -- Performative and passionate utterance -- The Wittgensteinian event -- Thoreau thinks of ponds, Heidegger of rivers -- The world as things.
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  6.  36
    Stanley Cavell (2002). Must We Mean What We Say?: A Book of Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Reissued with a new preface, this famous collection of essays covers a remarkably wide range of philosophical issues, including essays on Wittgenstein, Austin, Kierkegaard, and the philosophy of language, and extending beyond philosophy into discussions of music and drama. Previous edition hb ISBN (1976): 0-521-21116-6 Previous edition pb ISBN (1976): 0-521-29048-1.
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  7.  52
    Stanley Cavell (1988). In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism. University of Chicago Press.
    These lectures by one of the most influential and original philosophers of the twentieth century constitute a sustained argument for the philosophical basis of romanticism, particularly in its American rendering. Through his examination of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Wordsworth, and Coleridge, Stanley Cavell shows that romanticism and American transcendentalism represent a serious philosophical response to the challenge of skepticism that underlies the writings of Wittgenstein and Austin on ordinary language.
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  8.  39
    Stanley Cavell (1989). This New yet Unapproachable America: Lectures After Emerson After Wittgenstein. Living Batch Press.
    The two essays in this book, first published in 1989, were delivered as two of the 1987 Carpenter Lectures at the University of Chicago. Wittgenstein and Emerson are major influences on and subjects of Cavell's thought, and here he thinks and rethinks of these two intellectual forebears. As the title shows, he finds an important crux for contemplation in Emerson's idea of America.
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  9.  43
    Stanley Cavell (1964). Must We Mean What We Say? In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Inquiry. Dover Publications 172 – 212.
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  10.  3
    Stanley Cavell (2003). Emerson’s Transcendental Etudes. Stanford University Press.
    This book is Stanley Cavell’s definitive expression on Emerson. Over the past thirty years, Cavell has demonstrated that he is the most emphatic and provocative philosophical critic of Emerson that America has yet known. The sustained effort of that labor is drawn together here for the first time into a single volume, which also contains two previously unpublished essays and an introduction by Cavell that reflects on this book and the history of its emergence. -/- Students and scholars working in (...)
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  11. Stanley Cavell (1994). A Pitch of Philosophy: Autobiographical Exercises. Philosophy 69 (270):515-518.
     
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  12. Stanley Cavell (1981). The Senses of Walden.
     
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  13.  13
    Stanley Cavell & Paul Standish (2012). Stanley Cavell in Conversation with Paul Standish. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):155-176.
    Having acknowledged the recurrent theme of education in Stanley Cavell's work, the discussion addresses the topic of scepticism, especially as this emerges in the interpretation of Wittgenstein. Questions concerning rule‐following, language and society are then turned towards political philosophy, specifically with regard to John Rawls. The discussion examines the idea of the social contract, the nature of moral reasoning and the possibility of our lives' being above reproach, as well as Rawls's criticisms of Nietzschean perfectionism. This lays the way for (...)
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  14.  72
    Stanley Cavell (1995). Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida. Blackwell.
  15.  79
    Stanley Cavell (1958). Must We Mean What We Say? Inquiry 1 (1-4):172 – 212.
  16.  4
    Stanley Cavell (1998). Contesting Tears: The Hollywood Melodrama of the Unknown Woman. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (1):82-83.
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  17. Stanley Cavell (1962). The Availability of Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy. Philosophical Review 71 (1):67-93.
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  18. Michael Friedman, Stanley Cavell & Henry E. Allison (1997). Presidential Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):5-21.
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  19. Stanley Cavell (1992). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (1):138-139.
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  20.  19
    Stanley Cavell (1996). The Cavell Reader. Blackwell.
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  21.  15
    Stanley Cavell (1979). The World Viewed: Reflections on the Ontology of Film. Harvard University Press.
  22. Stanley Cavell (2003). Disowning Knowledge in Seven Plays of Shakespeare. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23.  19
    Stanley Cavell (1984). Themes Out of School: Effects and Causes. University of Chicago Press.
    In the first essay of this book, Stanley Cavell characterizes philosophy as a "willingness to think not about something other than what ordinary human beings think about, but rather to learn to think undistractedly about things that ordinary human beings cannot help thinking about, or anyway cannot help having occur to them, sometimes in fantasy, sometimes as a flash across a landscape." Fantasies of film and television and literature, flashes across the landscape of literary theory, philosophical discourse, and French historiography (...)
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  24. Stanley Cavell (1988). Declining Decline: Wittgenstein as a Philosopher of Culture. Inquiry 31 (3):253 – 264.
    Granted a certain depth of accuracy in citing an aspect of Spengler as an enactment of an aspect of Wittgenstein's thought, Wittgenstein's difference from Spengler should have depth. One difference can be characterized by saying that in the Investigations Wittgenstein diurnalizes Spengler's vision of the destiny toward exhausted forms, toward nomadism, toward loss of culture, or of home, or community: he depicts our everyday encounters with philosophy, with our ideals, as brushes with skepticism, wherein the ancient task of philosophy, to (...)
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  25.  14
    Stanley Cavell (2004). La philosophie du jour d'après Austen après Austin. Rue Descartes 45 (3):215.
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  26.  3
    Stanley Cavell (1982). Pursuits of Happiness: The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (1):103-106.
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  27.  13
    Stanley Cavell (2003). L'ordinaire et l'inquiétant. Rue Descartes 39 (1):88.
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  28.  17
    Stanley Cavell & Russell B. Goodman (eds.) (2005). Contending with Stanley Cavell. Oxford University Press.
    Stanley Cavell has been a brilliant, idiosyncratic, and controversial presence in American philosophy, literary criticism, and cultural studies for years. Even as he continues to produce new writing of a high standard -- an example of which is included in this collection -- his work has elicited responses from a new generation of writers in Europe and America. This collection showcases this new work, while illustrating the variety of Cavell's interests: in the "ordinary language" philosophy of Wittgenstein and Austin, in (...)
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  29.  18
    Stanley Cavell (2007). 6 Companionable Thinking. In Alice Crary (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Moral Life: Essays in Honor of Cora Diamond. MIT 281.
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  30. Stanley Cavell & Alexander Sesonske (1952). Moral Theory, Ethical Judgments and Empiricism. Mind 61 (244):543-563.
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  31.  11
    Stanley Cavell (2003). Les degrés de l'éternité. Rue Descartes 39 (1):102.
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  32.  78
    Stanley Cavell (2008). Time and Place for Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 39 (1):51–61.
    Writing in continuous gratitude to Gary Matthews's wonderful project of rescuing childhood from its disregard, not to say banishment, in professional philosophy, I relate here certain moments in his considerations of early childhood to moments in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations, which opens with a scene of childhood from Augustine's Confessions, and also to moments in later stages of childhood (as Matthews also significantly indicates) and, beyond that, to adolescent crises and to what I have called philosophy as "the education of grown-ups." (...)
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  33. Stanley Cavell, Ted Cohen, Paul Guyer & Hilary Putnam (1993). Pursuits of Reason Essays in Honor of Stanley Cavell. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  34. Stanley Cavell (1988). Disowning Knowledge: In Six Plays of Shakespeare. Philosophy 63 (246):546-547.
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  35. Stanley Cavell (2000). Beginning to Read Barbara Cassin. Hypatia 15 (4):99-101.
    Stanley Cavell reflects on the writing of Barbara Cassin in light of his interest in interpreting certain philosophers as "philosophically destructive," where this destructiveness may in fact be understood as philosophically creative. Cavell suggests that the writings of Austin and Wittgenstein may be considered in these terms, and speculates on the potential interest these writers might have for Cassin. Cassin's call for a rethinking of philosophy might be seen as uniquely essential to the practice of Austin and Wittgenstein.
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  36.  31
    Stanley Cavell (2005). Cavell on Film. State University of New York Press.
    In his introduction, William Rothman provides an overview of Cavell's work on film and his aims as a philosopher more generally."--BOOK JACKET.
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  37.  2
    Stanley Cavell (2006). L’importanza Del Walden Di Thoreau. Annali Del Dipartimento di Filosofia 12:57-74.
    An interview with Stanley Cavell about his early book The Senses of Walden. First of all the interview clarifies some parts of that book and explains how it was written, then Cavell describes his relation with the figures of Thoreau and Emerson, his peculiar approach in reading the works of other authors, and tells something about his way of writing philosophy.
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  38. Stanley Cavell, Kurt Rudolf Fischer & Ludwig Nagl (2001). Nach der Philosophie Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  39.  65
    Stanley Cavell (1965). Austin at Criticism. Philosophical Review 74 (2):204-219.
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  40. Stanley Cavell (2006). The Incessance and the Absence of the Political. In Andrew John Norris (ed.), The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press
     
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  41.  72
    Stanley Cavell & David Hills (1980). Cavell on Expression. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):745-746.
  42.  6
    Stanley Cavell (1985). The Division of Talent. Critical Inquiry 11 (4):519-538.
    My letter of invitation to this seminar expresses the thought that “it will be very useful to have someone from outside the field help us see ourselves.” Given my interests in what you might call the fact of literary study, I was naturally attracted by the invitation to look at literary study as a discipline or profession but also suspicious of the invitation. I thought: Do professionals really want to be helped to see themselves by outsiders? This is an invitation (...)
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  43.  67
    Stanley Cavell & Barry Stroud (1980). Reasonable Claims: Cavell and the Tradition. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):731-744.
  44.  37
    Stanley Cavell (2003). Old and New in Emerson and Nietzsche. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):53-62.
    This paper concerns the interpretation of Nietzsche and his readings of R.W. Emerson.
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  45. Stanley Cavell (1971). The World Viewed. New York,Viking Press.
     
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  46. Stanley Cavell (1992). The Senses of Walden an Expanded Edition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  47.  30
    Stanley Cavell (1999). Reflections on a Life of Philosophy. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 7 (1):19-28.
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  48.  14
    Stanley Cavell (1999). Benjamin and Wittgenstein: Signals and Affinities. Critical Inquiry 25 (2):235-246.
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  49.  50
    Stanley Cavell (1988). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism: The Carus Lectures, 1988. University Of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two ...
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  50. Stanley Cavell (2005). Passionate and Performative Utterance: Morals of an Encounter. In Stanley Cavell & Russell B. Goodman (eds.), Contending with Stanley Cavell. Oxford University Press 177--198.
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