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  1. Stanley N. Salthe (2012). Frameworking Ascendency Increase (a Review of R. E. Ulanowicz, A Third Window: Natural Life Beyond Newton and Darwin. Templeton Foundation Press, 2009). [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (2):223-230.
    In this paper I provide a framework—what I refer to as ‘development theory’—for Ulanowicz’s ascendency theory of ecosystem development. Development theory is based in thermodynamics and information theory. A prominent feature of development theory is an understanding of senescence.
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  2. Stanley N. Salthe (2012). Hierarchical Structures. Axiomathes 22 (3):355 - 383.
    This paper compares the two known logical forms of hierarchy, both of which have been used in models of natural phenomena, including the biological. I contrast their general properties, internal formal relations, modes of growth (emergence) in applications to the natural world, criteria for applying them, the complexities that they embody, their dynamical relations in applied models, and their informational relations and semiotic aspects.
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  3. Stanley N. Salthe (2011). A Journey From Science Through Systems Science in Pursuit of Change. World Futures 67 (4-5):282 - 303.
    This article traces my attempts to come to grips with the problem of change. Systems science deals with general principles, but, as with science in general, is wedded to mechanistic models. Natural systems are not machines, are generative, and can change unpredictably. An example is given showing that explicit dynamical models are subverted by the present moment, which is non-existent in them. This moment can be modeled by a compositional hierarchy, but no change happens therein. Subsumptive hierarchies can serve as (...)
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  4. Stanley N. Salthe (2010). Development (and Evolution) of the Universe. Foundations of Science 15 (4):357-367.
    I distinguish Nature from the World. I also distinguish development from evolution. Development is progressive change and can be modeled as part of Nature, using a specification hierarchy. I have proposed a ‘canonical developmental trajectory’ of dissipative structures with the stages defined thermodynamically and informationally. I consider some thermodynamic aspects of the Big Bang, leading to a proposal for reviving final cause. This model imposes a ‘hylozooic’ kind of interpretation upon Nature, as all emergent features at higher levels would have (...)
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  5. Stanley N. Salthe (2010). What is Semiotics? Biosemiotics 3 (2):245-251.
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  6. Stanley N. Salthe (2009). A Hierarchical Framework for Levels of Reality: Understanding Through Representation. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 19 (1):87-99.
    Levels of reality reflect one kind of complexity, which can be modeled using a specification hierarchy. Levels emerged during the Big Bang, as physical degrees of freedom became increasingly fixed as the expanding universe developed, and new degrees of freedom associated with higher levels opened up locally, requiring new descriptive semantics. History became embodied in higher level entities, which are increasingly individuated, aggregate patterns of lower level entities. Development is an epigenetic trajectory from vaguer to more definite and individuated embodiment, (...)
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  7. Stanley N. Salthe (2009). Darwin and Some Leading Ideas of Contemporary Western Culture. Ludus Vitalis 17 (32):173-178.
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  8. Stanley N. Salthe (2009). Inside / Outside. Biosemiotics 2 (2):247-253.
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  9. Stanley N. Salthe (2008). On Koichiro Matsuno's Paper “Molecular Semiotics Toward the Emergence of Life”. Biosemiotics 1 (1):145-146.
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  10. Stanley N. Salthe (2008). Purpose in Nature. Ludus Vitalis 16 (29):49-58.
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  11. Stanley N. Salthe (2008). The System of Interpretance, Naturalizing Meaning as Finality. Biosemiotics 1 (3):285-294.
    A materialist construction of semiosis requires system embodiment at particular locales, in order to function as systems of interpretance. I propose that we can use a systemic model of scientific measurement to construct a systems view of semiosis. I further suggest that the categories required to understand that process can be used as templates when generalizing to biosemiosis and beyond. The viewpoint I advance here is that of natural philosophy—which, once granted, incurs no principled block to further generalization all the (...)
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  12. Stanley N. Salthe (2001). Theoretical Biology as an Anticipatory Text: The Relevance of Uexküll to Current Issues in Evolutionary Systems. Semiotica 2001 (134):359-380.
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  13. Stanley N. Salthe (1998). Naturalizing Semiotics. Semiotica 120 (3-4):381-394.
     
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  14. Koichiro Matsuno & Stanley N. Salthe (1995). Global Idealism/Local Materialism. Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):309-337.
    We are concerned with two modes of describing the dynamics of natural systems. Global descriptions require simultaneous global coordination of all dynamical operations. Global dynamics, including mechanics, remain invariant in the absence of external perturbation. But, failing impossible global coordination, dynamical operations could actually become coordinated only locally. In local records, as in global ones, the law of the excluded middle would be strictly observed, but without global coordination it could only be fullfilled sequentially by passing causative factors forward onto (...)
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  15. Stanley N. Salthe (1995). A Peircean Semiotic Interpretation Od Development. Ludus Vitalis 3 (4):15-28.
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  16. Stanley N. Salthe (1993). La ciencia comno base para una nueva comprensión de lo mitológico. Ludus Vitalis 1 (1):95-116.
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  17. Stanley N. Salthe (1990). Misplaced Predicates and Misconstrued Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):86-87.
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  18. Stanley N. Salthe & Barbara M. Salthe (1989). Ecosystem Moral Considerability: A Reply to Cahen. Environmental Ethics 11 (4):355-361.
    Appeals to science as a help in constructing policy on complex issues often assume that science has relatively clear-cut, univocal answers. That is not so today in the environmentally crucial fields of ecology and evolutionary biology. The social role of science has been as a source of information to be used in the prediction and domination of nature. Its perspectives are finely honed for such purposes. However, other more conscientious perspectives are now appearing within science, and we provide an example (...)
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  19. Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken (1989). Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  20. Stanley N. Salthe (1988). Modeling Self -Organization. Semiotics:14-23.
    Foremost among the tasks facing a semiotically-informed modeling of natural open systems is the recognition and representation of self-organization. This forces attention on process, time, and energetics to complement the conventional semiotic bias toward structure, space, and informatics. While self -organization might be captured in numerous operational idioms, we suggest that the fundamentally distinctive formal structures of (a) development (intrinsic predictability) and (b) evolution (unexpected change through change in contextual meaning) constitute thewarp and woof of virtually all observations on systems (...)
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  21. Stanley N. Salthe (1984). Hierarchical Expansion of Evolutionary Biology Adaptability: The Significance of Variability From Molecule to Ecosystem Michael Conrad. BioScience 34 (8):517-517.
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  22. Stanley N. Salthe (1981). The World Represented as a Hierarchy of Nature May Not Require “Species”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):300.
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