Search results for 'Stanley Wilcox' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Dennis Wilcox, Ralph Barney, Stanley Cunningham & Deni Elliott-Boyle (1985). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (1):78 – 83.
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  2. Stanley Wilcox (1939). The Destructive Hypothetical Syllogism in Greek Logic and in Attic Oratory. [New Haven.
     
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  3. Jennifer Hornsby & Jason Stanley (2005). II Reply by Jason Stanley. Hornsby on the Phenomenology of Speech. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):131–145.
    The central claim is that the semantic knowledge exercised by people when they speak is practical knowledge. The relevant idea of practical knowledge is explicated, applied to the case of speaking, and connected with an idea of agents’ knowledge. Some defence of the claim is provided.
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  4.  2
    Shelley Wilcox (2015). Peter W. Higgins, Immigration Justice. Reviewed by Shelley Wilcox. Social Theory and Practice 41 (3):560-566.
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  5.  7
    J. Tate (1940). Stanley Wilcox: The Destructive Hypothetical Syllogism in Greek Logic and in Attic Oratory. Pp. 143. (Yale Dissertation, Photo-Copy of Typescript) 1938. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):113-114.
  6.  16
    Matthew Stanley (2008). Mysticism and Marxism: A.S. Eddington, Chapman Cohen, and Political Engagement Through Science Popularization. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (2):181-194.
    This paper argues that that political context of British science popularization in the inter-war period was intimately tied to contemporary debates about religion and science. A leading science popularizer, the Quaker astronomer A.S. Eddington, and one of his opponents, the materialist Chapman Cohen, are examined in detail to show the intertwined nature of science, philosophy, religion, and politics.
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  7. Jason Stanley (2005). Knowledge and Practical Interests. Oxford University Press.
    Jason Stanley presents a startling and provocative claim about knowledge: that whether or not someone knows a proposition at a given time is in part determined by his or her practical interests, i.e. by how much is at stake for that person at that time. In defending this thesis, Stanley introduces readers to a number of strategies for resolving philosophical paradox, making the book essential not just for specialists in epistemology but for all philosophers interested in philosophical methodology. (...)
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  8. Jennifer Hornsby & Jason Stanley (2005). I-Paper by Jennifer Hornsby. Semantic Knowledge and Practical Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):107–130.
    [Jennifer Hornsby] The central claim is that the semantic knowledge exercised by people when they speak is practical knowledge. The relevant idea of practical knowledge is explicated, applied to the case of speaking, and connected with an idea of agents' knowledge. Some defence of the claim is provided. /// [Jason Stanley] The central claim is that Hornsby's argument that semantic knowledge is practical knowledge is based upon a false premise. I argue, contra Hornsby, that speakers do not voice (...)
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  9. Jason Stanley (2007). Knowledge and Practical Interests. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Jason Stanley presents a startling and provocative claim about knowledge: that whether or not someone knows a proposition at a given time is in part determined by his or her practical interests, i.e. by how much is at stake for that person at that time. So whether a true belief is knowledge is not merely a matter of supporting beliefs or reliability; in the case of knowledge, practical rationality and theoretical rationality are intertwined. Stanley defends this thesis against (...)
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  10.  9
    John T. Wilcox (1997). What Aphorism Does Nietzsche Explicate in Genealogy of Morals, Essay III? Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):593-610.
    What Aphorism Does Nietzsche Explicate in Genealogy of Morals, Essay III ? JOHN T. WILCOX A picture held us captive. Wittgenstein ~ AS EVERYONE KNOWS, the dominant opinion is not always correct. Current scholarship, in all likelihood, makes assumptions which have not yet been questioned; and probably some of them will be seen to be false, once they have been examined. I will argue here that there is a dominant but erroneous assumption concerning the Third Essay in Nietzsche's On (...)
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  11.  2
    M. C. Stanley (1994). A Π12 Singleton Incompatible with 0#. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 66 (1):27-88.
    Stanley, M.C., A Π12 singleton incompatible with 0#, Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 66 27–88. A non-constructible Π12 singleton that is absolute for ω-models of ZF is produced by class forcing over the minimum model.
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  12.  7
    Denis Stanley (2012). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts March - May. The Australasian Catholic Record 89 (1):99.
    Stanley, Denis This snippet from the poetry of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) captures how blind we can be to the presence of God in our lives. In the Gospels, being healed from physical blindness is also a celebration of coming to faith in Christ and using that new gift to follow him. The gift of having one's eyes opened is our constant prayer, more so than ever during Lent.
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  13. Jason Stanley (2013). Know How. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The goal of inquiry is to acquire knowledge of truths about the world. In this book, Jason Stanley argues that knowing how to do something amounts to knowing a truth about the world. When you learned how to swim, what happened is that you learned some truths about swimming, including a special kind of truth about it that answers the question, 'How could you swim?' Know How develops an account of the kinds of answers to questions, knowledge of which (...)
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  14. John Hawthorne & Jason Stanley (2008). Knowledge and Action. Journal of Philosophy 105 (10):571-590.
    Judging by our folk appraisals, then, knowledge and action are intimately related. The theories of rational action with which we are familiar leave this unexplained. Moreover, discussions of knowledge are frequently silent about this connection. This is a shame, since if there is such a connection it would seem to constitute one of the most fundamental roles for knowledge. Our purpose in this paper is to rectify this lacuna, by exploring ways in which knowing something is related to rationally acting (...)
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  15. Jason Stanley & Timothy Williamson (2001). Knowing How. Journal of Philosophy 98 (8):411-444.
    Many philosophers believe that there is a fundamental distinction between knowing that something is the case and knowing how to do something. According to Gilbert Ryle, to whom the insight is credited, knowledge-how is an ability, which is in turn a complex of dispositions. Knowledge-that, on the other hand, is not an ability, or anything similar. Rather, knowledge-that is a relation between a thinker and a true proposition.
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  16. Jason Stanley (2000). Context and Logical Form. Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (4):391--434.
    In this paper, I defend the thesis that alleffects of extra-linguistic context on thetruth-conditions of an assertion are traceable toelements in the actual syntactic structure of thesentence uttered. In the first section, I develop thethesis in detail, and discuss its implications for therelation between semantics and pragmatics. The nexttwo sections are devoted to apparent counterexamples.In the second section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of true non-sentential assertions.In the third section, I argue that there are noconvincing examples of what (...)
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  17. Jason Stanley & Zoltán Gendler Szabó (2000). On Quantifier Domain Restriction. Mind and Language 15 (2&3):219--61.
  18. Jason Stanley (2004). On the Linguistic Basis for Contextualism. Philosophical Studies 119 (1-2):119-146.
    Contextualism in epistemology is the doctrine that the proposition expressed by a knowledge attribution relative to a context is determined in part by the standards of justification salient in that context. The (non-skeptical) contextualist allows that in some context c, a speaker may truly attribute knowledge at a time of a proposition p to Hannah, despite her possession of only weak inductive evidence for the truth of that proposition. Relative to another context, someone may make the very same knowledge attribution (...)
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  19. Jason Stanley (2008). Knowledge and Certainty. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):35-57.
    This paper is a companion piece to my earlier paper “Fallibilism and Concessive Knowledge Attributions”. There are two intuitive charges against fallibilism. One is that it countenances the truth (and presumably acceptability) of utterances of sentences such as “I know that Bush is a Republican, though it might be that he is not a Republican”. The second is that it countenances the truth (and presumably acceptability) of utterances of sentences such as “I know that Bush is a Republican, even though (...)
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  20. Jason Stanley (2002). Making It Articulated. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):149–168.
  21. Jason Stanley (2005). Fallibilism and Concessive Knowledge Attributions. Analysis 65 (286):126–131.
    Lewis concludes that fallibilism is uncomfortable, though preferable to scepticism. However, he believes that contextualism about knowledge allows us to ‘dodge the choice’ between fallibilism and scepticism. For the contextualist semantics for ‘know’ can explain the oddity of fallibilism, without landing us into scepticism.
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  22. Jason Stanley (2001). Hermeneutic Fictionalism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):36–71.
    Fictionalist approaches to ontology have been an accepted part of philosophical methodology for some time now. On a fictionalist view, engaging in discourse that involves apparent reference to a realm of problematic entities is best viewed as engaging in a pretense. Although in reality, the problematic entities do not exist, according to the pretense we engage in when using the discourse, they do exist. In the vocabulary of Burgess and Rosen (1997, p. 6), a nominalist construal of a given discourse (...)
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  23. Jeffrey King & Jason Stanley (2005). Semantics, Pragmatics, and the Role of Semantic Content. In Zoltán Szabó (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford University Press 111--164.
    Followers of Wittgenstein allegedly once held that a meaningful claim to know that p could only be made if there was some doubt about the truth of p. The correct response to this thesis involved appealing to the distinction between the semantic <span class='Hi'>content</span> of a sentence and features attaching (merely) to its use. It is inappropriate to assert a knowledge-claim unless someone in the audience has doubt about what the speaker claims to know. But this fact has nothing to (...)
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  24. Jason Stanley (2003). Context, Interest Relativity and the Sorites. Analysis 63 (4):269–281.
    According to what I will call a contextualist solution to the sorites paradox, vague terms are context-sensitive, and one can give a convincing dissolution of the sorites paradox in terms of this context-dependency. The reason, according to the contextualist, that precise boundaries for expressions like “heap” or “tall for a basketball player” are so difficult to detect is that when two entities are sufficiently similar (or saliently similar), we tend to shift the interpretation of the vague expression so that if (...)
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  25. M. C. Stanley (1992). Forcing Disabled. Journal of Symbolic Logic 57 (4):1153-1175.
    It is proved (Theorem 1) that if 0♯ exists, then any constructible forcing property which over L adds no reals, over V collapses an uncountable L-cardinal to cardinality ω. This improves a theorem of Foreman, Magidor, and Shelah. Also, a method for approximating this phenomenon generically is found (Theorem 2). The strategy is first to reduce the problem of `disabling' forcing properties to that of specializing certain trees in a weak sense.
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  26. Jason Stanley (2003). Modality and What is Said. In John Hawthorne (ed.), Language and Mind. Blackwell 321--44.
    If, relative to a context, what a sentence says is necessarily true, then what it says must be so. If, relative to a context, what a sentence says is possible, then what it says could be true. Following natural philosophical usage, it would thus seem clear that in assessing an occurrence of a sentence for possibility or necessity, one is assessing what is said by that occurrence. In this paper, I argue that natural philosophical usage misleads here. In assessing an (...)
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  27.  29
    Tisha L. N. Emerson, Stephen J. Conroy & Charles W. Stanley (2007). Ethical Attitudes of Accountants: Recent Evidence From a Practitioners' Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):73 - 87.
    Recent highly publicized ethical breaches including those at Enron and WorldCom have focused attention on ethical behavior within the accounting profession. At the heart of the debate is whether ethical attitudes of accountants are to blame. Using a nationally representative sample of accounting practitioners and a multidisciplinary student sample at two Southern United States universities, we compare sample responses to 25 ethically charged vignettes to test whether they differ. Overall, we find no significant difference – even for a specific “accounting (...)
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  28. Shelley Wilcox (2007). Immigrant Admissions and Global Relations of Harm. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (2):274–291.
  29. Hiram M. Stanley (1892). On Primitive Consciousness. Philosophical Review 1 (4):433-442.
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  30.  22
    Jason Stanley (2007). Replies to Gilbert Harman, Ram Neta, and Stephen Schiffer. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (1):196–210.
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  31.  52
    Jason Stanley (2007). Précis of Knowledge and Practical Interests. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (1):168–172.
    Our intuitions about whether someone knows that p vary even fixing the intuitively epistemic features of that person’s situation. Sometimes they vary with features of our own situation, and sometimes they vary with features of the putative knower’s situation. If the putative knower is in a risky situation and her belief that p is pivotal in achieving a positive outcome of one of the actions available to her, or avoiding a negative one, we often feel she must be in a (...)
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  32. Hiram M. Stanley (1886). Feeling and Emotion. Mind 11 (41):66-76.
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  33. John T. Wilcox (1972). Elements of Irrationalism in Nietzsche's Metaethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (2):227-240.
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  34.  15
    Harvey Friedman & Lee Stanley (1989). A Borel Reducibility Theory for Classes of Countable Structures. Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (3):894-914.
    We introduce a reducibility preordering between classes of countable structures, each class containing only structures of a given similarity type (which is allowed to vary from class to class). Though we sometimes work in a slightly larger context, we are principally concerned with the case where each class is an invariant Borel class (i.e. the class of all models, with underlying set $= \omega$, of an $L_{\omega_1\omega}$ sentence; from this point of view, the reducibility can be thought of as a (...)
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  35.  45
    V. Keeling Stanley (1928). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 37 (146):244-245.
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  36. Jason Stanley (1998). Persons and Their Properties. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (191):159-175.
    According to what I call ‘the asymmetry thesis’, persons, though they are the direct bearers of the properties expressed by mental predicates, are not the direct bearers of properties such as those expressed by ‘weighs 135 pounds’ or ‘has crossed legs’. A number of different views about persons entail the asymmetry thesis. I first argue that the asymmetry thesis entails an error theory about our discourse involving person‐referring terms. I then argue that it is further threatened by consideration of the (...)
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  37. Jason Stanley (2005). Review of Robyn Carston, Thoughts and Utterances. [REVIEW] Mind and Language 20 (3):364–368.
    Relevance Theory is the influential theory of linguistic interpretation first championed by Dan Sperber and Deirdre Wilson. Relevance theorists have made important contributions to our understanding of a wide range of constructions, especially constructions that tend to receive less attention in semantics and philosophy of language. But advocates of Relevance Theory also have had a tendency to form a rather closed community, with an unwillingness to translate their own special vocabulary and distinctions into more neutral vernacular. Since Robyn Carston (...)
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  38. Omar De la Cruz, Eric Hall, Paul Howard, Jean E. Rubin & Adrienne Stanley (2002). Definitions of Compactness and the Axiom of Choice. Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (1):143-161.
    We study the relationships between definitions of compactness in topological spaces and the roll the axiom of choice plays in these relationships.
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  39. Bina Gupta & William C. Wilcox (1984). "Tat Tvam Asi": An Important Identity Statement or a Mere Tautology. Philosophy East and West 34 (1):85-94.
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  40.  50
    Jason Stanley & Zoltán Gendler Szabó (2000). Reply to Bach and Neale. Mind and Language 15 (2&3):295–298.
  41.  12
    Richard P. Stanley (1999). Qualia Space. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (1):49-60.
    We define qualia space Q to be the space of all possible conscious experience. For simplicity we restrict ourselves to perceptual experience only, though other kinds of experience could also be considered. Qualia space is a highly idealized concept that unifies the perceptual experience of all possible brains. We argue that Q is a closed pointed cone in an infinite-dimensional separable real topological vector space. This quite technical structure can be explained for the most part in a simple, intuitive way. (...)
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  42.  77
    John Wilcox (1953). The Beginnings of l'Art Pour L'Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 11 (4):360-377.
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  43.  20
    H. M. Stanley (1884). On the Classification of the Sciences. Mind 9 (34):265-274.
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  44.  33
    Marjorie T. Stanley (1990). Ethical Perspectives on the Foreign Direct Investment Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1):1 - 10.
    This paper examines the foreign direct investment decision from an ethical perspective, and considers the moral agency involved in such decisions, with emphasis upon the corporate decision-maker. Historical capital allocation models once regarded as both financially and ethically normative are shown to be deficient in today's environment. Work of modern western philososphical and theological ethicists is included in analyses of the applicability of selected ethical approaches or metaphors to multinational foreign direct investment decisions and the corporate manager's role and responsibility (...)
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  45.  10
    Kimberly A. Urie, Alison Stanley & Jerold D. Friedman (2003). The Humane Imperative: A Moral Opportunity. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):20 – 21.
  46.  46
    Hiram M. Stanley (1889). Relation of Feeling to Pleasure and Pain. Mind 14 (56):537-544.
  47.  43
    Jason Stanley (1999). Understanding, Context-Relativity, and the Description Theory. Analysis 59 (1):14 - 18.
  48.  18
    William H. Wilcox (1987). Egoists, Consequentialists, and Their Friends. Philosophy and Public Affairs 16 (1):73-84.
  49.  29
    Hiram M. Stanley (1898). Space and Science. Philosophical Review 7 (6):615-620.
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  50.  9
    S. Wilcox & S. Katz (1981). A Direct Realist Alternative to the Traditional Conception of Memory. Behaviorism 9 (2):227-40.
    In this paper we criticize the commonly accepted theory of memory, and offer an alternative. According to the traditional view, memory is a stored mental representation of things past. We show, through an analysis of a single act of recognition, the logical oddities to which this view leads. Since, however, these are generally ignored, we also consider those characteristics of the traditional view which apparently make it attractive to those who hold it, namely its consonance with the commonly held conception (...)
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