Search results for 'Star Trek television programs' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Hanley (1997/1998). Is Data Human?: The Metaphysics of Star Trek. Basic Books.score: 732.0
    Professor Richard Hanley faced the dilemma plaguing so many philosophy professors today—how to entice students into the classroom. Based upon his own successful course, Is Data Human presents a thoroughly unique and enjoyable way of introducing students to the basic concepts of philosophy as seen through the lens of Star Trek. From the nature of a person, of minds, and of consciousness, to ethics and morality, to the nature and extent of knowledge and free will, Hanley brings a (...)
     
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  2. Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (2007). Star Trek and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 288.0
    Philosophy and space travel are characterized by the same fundamental purpose: exploration. An essential guide for both philosophers and Trekkers, Star Trek and Philosophy combines a philosophical spirit of inquiry with the beloved television and film series to consider questions not only about the scientific prospects of interstellar travel but also the inward journey to examine the human condition. The expansive topics range from the possibilities for communication among different cultural backgrounds to questions about the stoic temperament (...)
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  3. Rada Drezgic & Predrag Krstic (2013). Who is (Still) Afraid of Queer: Homosexual and Transgender Strategies of Star Trek. Filozofija I Društvo 24 (3):196-211.score: 189.0
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  4. Anne Collins Smith (1995). The Philosophy of Star Trek. Teaching Philosophy 18 (4):295-300.score: 135.0
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  5. Ken Marsalek (2001). The Ethics of Star Trek. Philosophy Now 34:45-46.score: 135.0
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  6. Richard L. Lanigan (1993). "Star Trek. Semiotics:223-230.score: 135.0
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  7. Thomas F. N. Puckett (1993). "Abreaction, Aporia, and Malaise in Star Trek. Semiotics:231-238.score: 135.0
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  8. Dorothy Atkins (1983). Star Trek: A Philosophical Interpretation. In Robert E. Myers (ed.), The Intersection of Science Fiction and Philosophy: Critical Studies. Greenwood Press. 93--108.score: 135.0
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  9. Kathy E. Ferguson (2008). This Species Which is Not One : Identity Practices in Star Trek : Deep Space Nine. In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.score: 135.0
  10. Henrik Hansemann (2013). Die Philosophie Bei Star Trek: Mit Kirk, Spock Und Picard Auf der Reise Durch Unendliche Weiten. Wiley-Vch.score: 135.0
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  11. Kenneth Marsalek (1992). Star Trek: Humanism of the Future. Free Inquiry 12 (4):53-56.score: 135.0
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  12. John McCrone (1994). The Myth of Irrationality: The Science of the Mind From Plato to Star Trek. Carroll & Graf Publishers.score: 135.0
     
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  13. Thomas Fn Puckett (forthcoming). Abreaction, Aporia, and Malaise in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Lacan's Theory of Discourse. Semiotics.score: 135.0
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  14. K. J. Shanahan, C. M. Hermans & M. R. Hyman (2003). Violent Commercials in Television Programs for Children. Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising 25 (1):61--69.score: 135.0
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  15. Charles W. Harvey (2004). Epochē, Entertainment and Ethics: On the Hyperreality of Everyday Life. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):261-269.score: 81.0
    In this essay, I argue that popular entertainment can be understood in terms of Husserl’s concepts of epochē, reduction and constitution, and, conversely, that epochē, reduction and constitution can be explicated in terms of popular entertainment. To this end I use Husserl’s concepts to explicate and reflect upon the psychological and ethical effects of an exemplary instance of entertainment, the renowned Star Trek episode entitled “The Measure of a Man.” The importance of such an exercise is twofold: (1) (...)
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  16. Rebecca J. Glover, Lance C. Garmon & Darrell M. Hull (2011). Media's Moral Messages: Assessing Perceptions of Moral Content in Television Programming. Journal of Moral Education 40 (1):89-104.score: 66.0
    This study extends the examination of moral content in the media by exploring moral messages in television programming and viewer characteristics predictive of the ability to perceive such messages. Generalisability analyses confirmed the reliability of the Media?s Moral Messages (MMM) rating form for analysing programme content and the existence of 10 moral themes prevalent in television media. Standard regression analyses yielded evidence indicating viewers? moral expertise, as measured by the Defining Issues Test (DIT), familiarity with the programme and (...)
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  17. Adilson José Francisco (2011). “Pare de sofrer”: trânsitos religiosos e televangelismo na fronteira (“Stop suffering”: religious transit and television evangelism at the border) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n22p446. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (22):446-465.score: 57.0
    Este artigo trata das formas de construção e reelaboração identitárias que ocorrem a partir dos processos de adesões religiosas em curso nos contextos urbanos atuais. Através das narrativas midiáticas e dos depoimentos orais de fiéis que aderiram ao neopentecostalismo, busca-se perceber como ocorrem os trânsitos por entre modalidades religiosas. Neste texto discuto os modos de recepção de uma modalidade de narrativa recorrente nos programas televisivos da Igreja Universal - os testemunhos – destacando a força incorporadora desta modalidade narrativa nas mediações (...)
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  18. Huei Lan Wang (2009). The Impact of Foreign Programs on Taiwanese Youth and the Significant Role of Media Education. Asian Culture and History 1 (2):P161.score: 57.0
    As cable television channel bloomed and grew in Taiwan, more and more teenagers watched a wide variety of foreign TV programmers through hundreds of channels. The impact of this media trend among Taiwanese youth stresses the importance of research to assess whether local college students learn from foreign television programming. In this research, which supports the theoretical discussion in this paper, the nature of these learnings was analyzed as well. In general, this study aims to explore the relevant (...)
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  19. William S. Brown (2002). Ethics and the Business of Children's Public Television Programming. Teaching Business Ethics 6 (1):73-81.score: 55.0
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  20. Els De Bens (1998). Television Programming: More Diversity, More Convergence. In Kees Brants, Joke Hermes & Liesbet van Zoonen (eds.), The Media in Question: Popular Cultures and Public Interests. Sage Publications.score: 55.0
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  21. Ronald Bishop & A. Hakanen Ernest (2002). In the Public Interest? The State of Local Television Programming Fifteen Years After Deregulation, 26 J. Of Comm. Inquiry 261.score: 55.0
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  22. Richard Kilborn (2006). 'Mixing and Matching': The Hybridising Impulse in Today's Factual Television Programming. In Garin Dowd, Lesley Stevenson & Jeremy Strong (eds.), Genre Matters. Intellect Ltd.. 109--121.score: 55.0
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  23. Thomas Richard Fahy (ed.) (2010). The Philosophy of Horror. University Press of Kentucky.score: 54.0
    Inviting readers to ponder this genre's various manifestations since the late 1700s, this collection of probing essays allows fans and philosophy buffs alike to ...
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  24. Gregory Bergman (2011). I Watch, Therefore I Am: From Socrates to Sartre, the Great Mysteries of Life as Explained Through Howdy Doody, Marcia Brady, Homer Simpson, Don Draper, and Other Tv Icons. Adams Media.score: 54.0
    What's the world made of? Donuts! and Beer! -- Protagoras, Gorgias, Captain Kirk, and Denny Crane -- Socrates : The Sergeant Schultz of Ancient Greece -- Plato is the new American Idol -- Aristotle loves Lucy -- Charlie Harper's Non-Epicurean lifestyle -- St. Augustine's Highway to Heaven -- Scully shaves Mulder with Ockham's Razor -- Larry Hagman dreams of Descartes -- Locke versus Hobbes, or The Brady Bunch takes on Survivor -- Can or can't Kant like vampires? -- Reading Hegel (...)
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  25. E. J. Farkas (1988). A Faithful Embedding of Parallel Computations in Star-Finite Models. Studia Logica 47 (3):203 - 212.score: 54.0
    The purpose of this paper is to show that there exist star-finite tree-structured sets in which the computations of parallel programs can be faithfully embedded, and that the theory of star-finite sets and relations therefore provides a new tool for the analysis of non-deterministic computations.
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  26. Douglas Kellner, Public Access Television.score: 54.0
    Public access television has been one of the most interesting and controversial developments in the intersection between media and democracy within the past several decades. Beginning in the 1970s, cable systems began to offer access channels to the public, so that groups and individuals could make programs for other individuals in their own communities. Access systems began to proliferate and access programming has been cablecast regularly in such places as New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Madison, Urbana, (...)
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  27. Jeffery Boswall (1989). Animal Stars: The Use of Animals in Film and Television. In D. A. Paterson & Mary Palmer (eds.), The Status of Animals: Ethics, Education, and Welfare. Published on Behalf of the Humane Education Foundation by C.A.B. International.score: 50.0
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  28. Barry King (1992). Stardom and Symbolic Degeneracy: Television and the Transformation of the Stars as Public Symbols. Semiotica 92 (1-2):1-48.score: 50.0
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  29. Larry Wos & Branden Fitelson, G The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Findin.score: 46.5
    The consideration of careful reasoning can be traced to Aristotle and earlier authors. The possibility of rigorous rules for drawing conclusions can certainly be traced to the Middle Ages when types o f syllogism were studied. Shortly after the introduction of computers, the audacious scientist naturally envisioned the automation of sound reasoning—reasoning in which conclusions that are drawn follow l ogically and inevitably from the given hypotheses. Did the idea spring from the intent to emulate s Sherlock Holmes and Mr. (...)
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  30. Christine James (2004). Huntington or Halliburton? The Real Clash of Civilizations in American Life. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (8):42-54.score: 43.0
    A wide variety of sources, including the Huntington literature and popular mass media, show that Huntington’s “clash of civilizations” idea actually has very little value in understanding the current global political context. The central assumption of Huntington’s view, that cultural kinship ties influence loyalties and agreements on a global scale, has little to do with the daily lives of American citizens and little to do with the decisions made by the current presidential administration. The mass media evidence from the United (...)
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  31. David Carrier (2011). The Star as Icon: Celebrity in the Age of Mass Consumption (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (2):117-119.score: 42.0
    Aestheticians have tended to focus their attention almost exclusively on high art, on museum painting and sculpture, classical music and literature, and architecture, leaving the popular arts to their colleagues in cultural studies. That seems a big mistake, for like it or not, popular movies and television attract enormous audiences everywhere, including very many people who take little interest in high art. This mass art creates stars, actors, and musicians who are so famous that everyone recognizes them. And celebrities (...)
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  32. Diana Cotrau (2010). A Transcultural Reading of Television Advertising. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (12):76-83.score: 38.0
    Global television has enabled cultures across the world to meet within the virtual space and interact in terms of decoding, meaning making and appropriating messages. It is also the case of the Romanian audience, a local community of viewers who have long been exposed to highly censored and restrictive programming (under the communist regime) and who are now enabled to identify with the (western) communities they have aspired to. We intend to illustrate our case with TV advertisements, which, generally, (...)
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  33. Elena C. Strauman & Bethany C. Goodier (2011). The Doctor(s) in House: An Analysis of the Evolution of the Television Doctor-Hero. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):31-46.score: 38.0
    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the “television doctor” by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal (...)
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  34. Rebecca Kukla, Talking Back: Monstrosity, Mundanity, and Cynicism in Television Talk Shows.score: 31.0
    Fertile grounds for theoretical inquiry can be found in the oddest corners. Contemporary television programming provides viewers with several talk shows of the grotesque, as I will call them, in which the aim of each episode is to put some monstrous human phenomenon on display with the help of a host and a participating studio audience. In this paper I will try to support the unlikely claim that these talk shows, which include The Jerry Springer Show and Sally Jesse (...)
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  35. Ken Perszyk, Nicholas J. J. Smith & Hamish Campbell, The Paradoxes of Time Travel.score: 27.0
    Humans have long been fascinated by the idea of visiting the past and of seeing what the future will bring. Time travel has been one of the most popular themes of science fiction. Most people have seen the TV series ‘Dr Who’ or ‘Quantum Leap’ or ‘Star Trek’. You’ve probably seen one of the ‘Back to the Future’ or ‘Terminator’ movies, or ‘Twelve Monkeys’. Time travel narratives provide fascinating plots, which exercise our imaginations in ever so many ways. (...)
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  36. Christine James (2005). The Benefits of Comedy: Teaching Ethics Through Shared Laughter. Academic Exchange Extra (April).score: 27.0
    Over the last three years I have been fortunate to teach an unusual class, one that provides an academic background in ethical and social and political theory using the medium of comedy. I have taught the class at two schools, a private liberal arts college in western Pennsylvania and a public regional state university in southern Georgia. While the schools vary widely in a number of ways, there are characteristics that the students share: the school in Pennsylvania had a large (...)
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  37. Scott A. Lukas & John Marmysz (eds.) (2009). Fear, Cultural Anxiety, and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy Films Remade. Lexington Books.score: 27.0
    This collection was inspired by the observation that film remakes offer us the opportunity to revisit important issues, stories, themes, and topics in a manner that is especially relevant and meaningful to contemporary audiences. Like mythic stories that are told again and again in differing ways, film remakes present us with updated perspectives on timeless ideas. While some remakes succeed and others fail aesthetically, they always say something about the culture in which_and for which_they are produced. Contributors explore the ways (...)
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  38. Eric T. Olson (1997). Relativism and Persistence. Philosophical Studies 88 (2):141-162.score: 27.0
    Philosophers often talk as if what it takes for a person to persist through time were up to us, as individuals or as a linguistic community, to decide. In most ordinary situations it might be fully determinate whether someone has survived or perished: barring some unforeseen catastrophe, it is clear enough that you will still exist ten minutes from now, for example. But there is no shortage of actual and imaginary situations where it is not so clear whether one survives. (...)
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  39. Lucas D. Introna (2009). The 'Measure of a Man' and the Ethos of Hospitality: Towards an Ethical Dwelling with Technology. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):93-102.score: 27.0
    In this paper, I argue for the impossible possibility of an ethical dwelling with technology. In arguing for an ethical comportment in our dealing with technology, I am not only arguing for the consideration of the ethical implications of technology (which we already do) but also, and more importantly, for an ethics of technological artefacts qua technology. Thus, I attempt to argue for a decentering (or rather overcoming) of anthropocentric ethics, urging us to move beyond any centre, whatever it may (...)
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  40. David Wittenberg (2013). Time Travel: The Popular Philosophy of Narrative. Fordham University Press.score: 27.0
    Introduction: Time travel and the mechanics of narrative -- Macrological fictions: evolutionary utopia and time travel (1887-1905) -- Historical interval I: the first time travel story -- Relativity, psychology, paradox: Wertenbaker to Heinlein (1923-1941) -- Historical interval II: three phases of time travel--the time machine -- The big time: multiple worlds, narrative viewpoint, and superspace -- Paradox and paratext: picturing narrative theory -- Theoretical interval: the primacy of the visual in time travel narrative -- Viewpoint-over-histories: narrative conservation in Star (...)
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  41. John Cramer, Hawking's Retreat.score: 27.0
    Seattle, the city where I live, teach, and do physics research, is the home of Paul Allen’s new Science Fiction Museum (SFM), located in the Experience Music Project building at Seattle Center, in the shadow of the Space Needle. The SFM is well worth a visit, offering a fascinating display of collected TV and movie props (e.g., Captain Kirk’s Chair from Star Trek ), SF memorabilia, and treasured books and manuscripts from the classic works of science fiction. In (...)
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  42. Patrick Sean Liam Flanagan (1999). Cyberspace: The Final Frontier? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1):115 - 122.score: 27.0
    The science fiction series of the '70's, Star Trek, began all its telecastings with the announcement "Space: The Final Frontier." Star Trek chronicled the voyage of a crew navigating their way through space. For the travelers, space seemed like the last unknown entity that needed to be investigated. As they journeyed, they learned of the boundless nature of space. Each episode portrayed a group of folks encountering new situations, attempting to solve another problem, or strategizing how (...)
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  43. Kevin S. Decker (2009). Teaching Autonomy and Emergence Through Pop Culture. Teaching Philosophy 32 (4):331-343.score: 27.0
    Teaching Kantian ethics is difficult, for “getting Kant right” extends to a wide field of concerns. This paper is aimed at instructors who wish to give interdisciplinary criticism of Kantian deontology by discussing exceptions naturalist critics take to Kant’s concept of “autonomy.” This concept can and should be supplanted by the notion of “emergent intelligence.” Surprising support for this project comes from the fictional exploits of Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard. I conclude by indicating how the residual lessons (...)
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  44. Hilary Lim (1999). Caesareans and Cyborgs. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):133-173.score: 27.0
    This paper argues that cyborg perspectives offer real possibilities for the debate around enforced caesareans and the search for a language to encompass embodied maternal subjectivity. It is suggested, with reference to the fictional narrative of Star Trek, that cyborg figures have the power to disrupt the liberal subject and the body in legal discourse, not least because the plethora of cyborgs challenges simple conceptions of connections/disconnections between bodies. Feminist readings of case law relating to enforced caesarean sections (...)
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  45. Aaron Adair (2012). The Star of Christ in the Light of Astronomy. Zygon 47 (1):7-29.score: 24.0
    Abstract Centuries of both theologians and astronomers have wondered what the Star of Bethlehem (Matt 2:2, 9) actually was, from miracle to planetary conjunction. Here a history of this search is presented, along with the difficulties the various proposals have had. The natural theories of the Star are found to be a recent innovation, and now almost exclusively maintained by scientists rather than theologians. Current problems with various theories are recognized, as well as general problems with the approach. (...)
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  46. Hans Moravec, Bodies, Robots, Minds.score: 24.0
    Serious attempts to build thinking machines began after the second world war. One line of research, called Cybernetics, used electronic circuitry imitating nervous systems to make machines that learned to recognize simple patterns, and turtle-like robots that found their way to recharging plugs. A different approach, named Artificial Intelligence, harnessed the arithmetic power of post-war computers to abstract reasoning, and by the 1960s made computers prove theorems in logic and geometry, solve calculus problems and play good games of checkers. At (...)
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  47. Dane K. Peterson (2004). Recruitment Strategies for Encouraging Participation in Corporate Volunteer Programs. Journal of Business Ethics 49 (4):371-386.score: 24.0
    Perhaps due to the numerous community and company benefits associated with corporate volunteer programs, an increasing number of national and international firms are adopting such programs. A major issue in organizing corporate volunteer programs concerns the strategies that are most effective for recruiting employee participation. The results of this study suggest that the most effective strategies for initiating participation in volunteer programs may not be the same as the strategies that are most effective in terms of (...)
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  48. Mark S. Blodgett (2011). Substantive Ethics: Integrating Law and Ethics in Corporate Ethics Programs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):39-48.score: 24.0
    Continual corporate malfeasance signals the need for obeying the law and for enhancing business ethics perspectives. Yet, the relationship between law and ethics and its integrative role in defining values are often unclear. While integrity-based ethics programs emphasize ethics values more than law or compliance, viewing ethics as being integrated with law may enhance understanding of an organization’s core values. The author refers to this integration of law and ethics as “substantive ethics,” analogous to the substantive law that evolves (...)
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  49. Iwo Białynicki-Birula (2004). Modeling Reality: How Computers Mirror Life. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The bookModeling Reality covers a wide range of fascinating subjects, accessible to anyone who wants to learn about the use of computer modeling to solve a diverse range of problems, but who does not possess a specialized training in mathematics or computer science. The material presented is pitched at the level of high-school graduates, even though it covers some advanced topics (cellular automata, Shannon's measure of information, deterministic chaos, fractals, game theory, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and Turing machines). These advanced (...)
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