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Stefan Schulz [11]Stefan M. Schulz [1]
  1. Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan M. Schulz, Theresa Stumpf, Paul Pauli & Claus Vögele (2013). Enhanced Cardiac Perception Is Associated With Increased Susceptibility to Framing Effects. Cognitive Science 37 (5):922-935.
    Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The “framing effect” is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decision-making. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss versus gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results (...)
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  2. J. Hastings, L. Jansen, Stefan Schulz & C. Steinbeck (2011). Substance Concentrations as Conditions for the Realization of Dispositions. In Ronald Cornet & Stefan Schulz (eds.), Semantic Applications in Life Sciences. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Formal Biomedical Knowledge Representation, hosted by Bio-Ontologies 2010.
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  3. Stefan Schulz, Ronald Cornet & Kent Spackman (2011). Consolidating SNOMED CT's Ontological Commitment. Applied Ontology 6 (1):1-11.
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  4. Stefan Schulz & Ludger Jansen (2009). Molecular Interactions. On the Ambiguity of Ordinary Statements in Biomedical Literature. Applied Ontology (4):21-34.
  5. Holger Stenzhorn, Stefan Schulz, Martin Boeker & Barry Smith (2009). Adapting Clinical Ontologies in Real-World Environments. Journal of Universal Computer Science, 14 (22), , 14 (22):3767-3780.
    The desideratum of semantic interoperability has been intensively discussed in medical informatics circles in recent years. Originally, experts assumed that this issue could be sufficiently addressed by insisting simply on the application of shared clinical terminologies or clinical information models. However, the use of the term ‘ontology’ has been steadily increasing more recently. We discuss criteria for distinguishing clinical ontologies from clinical terminologies and information models. Then, we briefly present the role clinical ontologies play in two multicentric research projects. Finally, (...)
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  6. Elena Beisswanger, Stefan Schulz, Holger Stenzhorn & Udo Hahn (2008). BioTop: An Upper Domain Ontology for the Life sciencesA Description of its Current Structure, Contents and Interfaces to OBO Ontologies. Applied Ontology 3 (4):205-212.
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  7. Stefan Schulz & Ludger Jansen (2006). Lmn-2 Interacts with Elf-2. On the Meaning of Common Statements in Biomedical Literature. In KR-MED 2006 – Biomedical Ontology in Action. Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Formal Knowledge Representation. MD. 37-45.
  8. Roland Neumann, Markus Hess, Stefan Schulz & Georg Alpers (2005). Automatic Behavioural Responses to Valence: Evidence That Facial Action is Facilitated by Evaluative Processing. Cognition and Emotion 19 (4):499-513.
  9. Stefan Schulz, Philipp Daumke, Barry Smith & Udo Hahn (2005). How to Distinguish Parthood From Location in Bioontologies. In Proceedings of the AMIA Symposium. American Medical Informatics Association.
    The pivotal role of the relation part-of in the description of living organisms is widely acknowledged. Organisms are open systems, which means that in contradistinction to mechanical artifacts they are characterized by a continuous flow and exchange of matter. A closer analysis of the spatial relations in biological organisms reveals that the decision as to whether a given particular is part-of a second particular or whether it is only contained-in the second particular is often controversial. We here propose a rule-based (...)
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  10. Barry Smith, Jose L. V. Mejino Jr, Stefan Schulz, Anand Kumar & Cornelius Rosse (2005). Anatomical Information Science. In Spatial Information Theory. Springer.
    The Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) is a map of the human body. Like maps of other sorts – including the map-like representations we find in familiar anatomical atlases – it is a representation of a certain portion of spatial reality as it exists at a certain (idealized) instant of time. But unlike other maps, the FMA comes in the form of a sophisticated ontology of its objectdomain, comprising some 1.5 million statements of anatomical relations among some 70,000 anatomical kinds. (...)
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