Search results for 'Stem Cells' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Melinda Bonnie Fagan (2010). Stems and Standards: Social Interaction in the Search for Blood Stem Cells. Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):67 - 109.
    This essay examines the role of social interactions in the search for blood stem cells, in a recent episode of biomedical research. Linked to mid-20th century cell biology, genetics and radiation research, the search for blood stem cells coalesced in the 1960s and took a developmental turn in the late 1980s, with significant ramifications for immunology, stem cell and cancer biology. Like much contemporary biomedical research, this line of inquiry exhibits a complex social structure and (...)
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  2.  9
    Yue Liang Zheng (forthcoming). Some Ethical Concerns About Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-8.
    Human induced pluripotent stem cells can be obtained from somatic cells, and their derivation does not require destruction of embryos, thus avoiding ethical problems arising from the destruction of human embryos. This type of stem cell may provide an important tool for stem cell therapy, but it also results in some ethical concerns. It is likely that abnormal reprogramming occurs in the induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and that the stem (...)
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  3.  8
    Melinda Bonnie Fagan (2016). Stem Cells and Systems Models: Clashing Views of Explanation. Synthese 193 (3):873-907.
    This paper examines a case of failed interdisciplinary collaboration, between experimental stem cell research and theoretical systems biology. Recently, two groups of theoretical biologists have proposed dynamical systems models as a basis for understanding stem cells and their distinctive capacities. Experimental stem cell biologists, whose work focuses on manipulation of concrete cells, tissues and organisms, have largely ignored these proposals. I argue that ‘failure to communicate’ in this case is rooted in divergent views of explanation: (...)
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  4.  11
    Karen Lebacqz (2012). Stumbling on Status: Abortion, Stem Cells, and Faulty Reasoning. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):75-82.
    Common arguments from the abortion debate have set the stage for the debate on stem cell research. Unfortunately, those arguments demonstrate flawed reasoning—jumping to unfounded conclusions, using value laden language rather than careful argument, and ignoring morally relevant aspects of the situation. The influence of flawed abortion arguments on the stem cell debate results in failures of moral reasoning and in lack of attention to important morally relevant differences between abortion and human embryonic stem cells. Among (...)
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  5.  8
    Stavros Ioannidis (2014). The Philosophy of Stem Cells. [REVIEW] Metascience 24 (2):285-288.
    Melinda Fagan’s book on the philosophy of stem cell biology is a superb discussion of this exciting field of contemporary science, and the first book-length philosophical treatment of the subject. It contains a detailed and insightful examination of stem cell science, its structure, methods, and challenges.The book does not require any previous knowledge of stem cell biology—all the relevant scientific details and concepts, the central experimental procedures and results, as well as the historical development of the field, (...)
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  6.  17
    Catherine Waldby, Ian Kerridge & Loane Skene (2012). Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):15-17.
    Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 15-17 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9351-x Authors Catherine Waldby, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Ian Kerridge, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Medical Foundation Building (K25), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Loane Skene, Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Studies, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VA, Australia Journal Journal of (...)
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  7.  3
    Ioana Iancu & Delia Cristina Balaban (2009). Romanian Media Coverage on Bioethics. The Issue of Stem Cells. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):24.
    In the last decades, scientific developments are largely discussed and debated mainly at the media level. Based on the agenda setting model, the importance of a certain theme is given by the frequency of its appearances in mass-media. Within this context, this paper focuses on the issue of stem cells and its media coverage in Romania. Using content analysis of the most read national newspapers, the research aims to emphasize two relevant aspects: the stem cells issue (...)
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  8.  18
    David B. Resnik (2002). The Commercialization of Human Stem Cells: Ethical and Policy Issues. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):127-154.
    The first stage of the human embryonic stem(ES) cell research debate revolved aroundfundamental questions, such as whether theresearch should be done at all, what types ofresearch may be done, who should do theresearch, and how the research should befunded. Now that some of these questions arebeing answered, we are beginning to see thenext stage of the debate: the battle forproperty rights relating to human ES cells. The reason why property rights will be a keyissue in this debate is (...)
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  9.  66
    Lucie Laplane (2011). Stem Cells and the Temporal Boundaries of Development: Toward a Species-Dependent View. Biological Theory 6 (1):48-58.
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  10.  10
    Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ionel Ciprian Pop & Ion Aurel Mironiuc (2012). Stem Cells Therapy and Research. Benefits and Ethical Challences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (32):190-205.
    The research on stem cell-based therapies has greatly expanded in recent years. Our text attempts to seek those religious and ethical challenges that stem cell therapy and research bring into debate. Our thesis is that bioethics can defend its principle without a religious background. We will develop our argumentation on three major points: firstly, a comparison between secular ethics and religious views will clarify why stem cell therapy and research are important from a scientific point of view, (...)
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  11.  11
    Anna‐Marei Boehm, Philip Rosenstiel & Thomas Cg Bosch (2013). Stem Cells and Aging From a Quasi‐Immortal Point of View. Bioessays 35 (11):994-1003.
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  12. Agata Sagan & Peter Singer (2007). The Moral Status of Stem Cells. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):264–284.
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  13.  13
    Thomas C. G. Bosch (2009). Hydra and the Evolution of Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (4):478-486.
  14.  10
    Yves Maury, Morgane Gauthier, Marc Peschanski & Cécile Martinat (2012). Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modelling and Drug Screening. Bioessays 34 (1):61-71.
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  15.  1
    Samer Mi Hussein, Judith Elbaz & Andras A. Nagy (2013). Genome Damage in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Assessing the Mechanisms and Their Consequences. Bioessays 35 (3):152-162.
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  16.  11
    Godfrey B. Tangwa (2007). Moral Status of Embryonic Stem Cells: Perspective of an African Villager. Bioethics 21 (8):449–457.
  17.  3
    Tobias Schatton, Natasha Y. Frank & Markus H. Frank (2009). Identification and Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (10):1038-1049.
  18.  11
    Divya Rajamohan, Elena Matsa, Spandan Kalra, James Crutchley, Asha Patel, Vinoj George & Chris Denning (2013). Current Status of Drug Screening and Disease Modelling in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Bioessays 35 (3):281-298.
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  19.  8
    Earl Prinsloo, Mokgadi M. Setati, Victoria M. Longshaw & Gregory L. Blatch (2009). Chaperoning Stem Cells: A Role for Heat Shock Proteins in the Modulation of Stem Cell Self‐Renewal and Differentiation? Bioessays 31 (4):370-377.
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  20.  6
    Sean Vincent Murphy & Anthony Atala (2013). Organ Engineering – Combining Stem Cells, Biomaterials, and Bioreactors to Produce Bioengineered Organs for Transplantation. Bioessays 35 (3):163-172.
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  21.  4
    C. Florian Bentzinger, Yu Xin Wang, Julia von Maltzahn & Michael A. Rudnicki (2013). The Emerging Biology of Muscle Stem Cells: Implications for Cell‐Based Therapies. Bioessays 35 (3):231-241.
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  22.  3
    Anna M. Wobus (2010). The Janus Face of Pluripotent Stem Cells – Connection Between Pluripotency and Tumourigenicity. Bioessays 32 (11):993-1002.
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  23.  2
    Michael D. Green, Sarah Xl Huang & Hans‐Willem Snoeck (2013). Stem Cells of the Respiratory System: From Identification to Differentiation Into Functional Epithelium. Bioessays 35 (3):261-270.
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  24.  1
    Trevor A. Graham, Noor Jawad & Nicholas A. Wright (2010). Spindles Losing Their Bearings: Does Disruption of Orientation in Stem Cells Predict the Onset of Cancer? Bioessays 32 (6):468-472.
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  25.  1
    Dong‐Bo Ou, Hong‐Juan Lang, Rui Chen, Xiong‐Tao Liu & Qiang‐Sun Zheng (2009). Using Embryonic Stem Cells to Form a Biological Pacemaker Via Tissue Engineering Technology. Bioessays 31 (2):246-252.
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  26.  16
    Ronald K. F. Fung & Ian H. Kerridge (2013). Uncertain Translation, Uncertain Benefit and Uncertain Risk: Ethical Challenges Facing First-in-Human Trials of Induced Pluripotent Stem (Ips) Cells. Bioethics 27 (2):89-96.
    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell (...)
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  27.  27
    Demetrio Neri (2011). The Race Toward 'Ethically Universally Acceptable' Human Pluripotent (Embryonic-Like) Stem Cells: Only a Problem of Sources? Bioethics 25 (5):260-266.
    Over the past few years, several proposals aimed at procuring human pluripotent (embryonic-like) stem cells without involving the destruction of a human embryo have been proposed and widely discussed. This article focuses on a basic aspect of the debate, namely the plausibility of one or more of these new proposals being able to meet the ethical requirements that those who regard the human embryo as sacred have tried to impose on stem cells research in the last (...)
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  28.  2
    Melinda Cooper (2009). Regenerative Pathologies: Stem Cells, Teratomas and Theories of Cancer. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (1):55-66.
    What is now familiarly referred to as the ‘embryonic stem (ES) cell’ is a recent biological category whose origins lie in research into benign and malignant teratomas carried out in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. In these studies, the question of the normal or pathological character of the ES cell was a matter of considerable debate and indeed the term ES cell was often used interchangeably with that of the embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell. This article argues that the indecisiveness (...)
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  29.  53
    Robert Streiffer (2005). At the Edge of Humanity: Human Stem Cells, Chimeras, and Moral Status. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):347-370.
    : Experiments involving the transplantation of human stem cells and their derivatives into early fetal or embryonic nonhuman animals raise novel ethical issues due to their possible implications for enhancing the moral status of the chimeric individual. Although status-enhancing research is not necessarily objectionable from the perspective of the chimeric individual, there are grounds for objecting to it in the conditions in which it is likely to occur. Translating this ethical conclusion into a policy recommendation, however, is complicated (...)
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  30.  1
    Susan M. Millard & Nicholas M. Fisk (2013). Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Systemic Therapy: Shotgun Approach or Magic Bullets? Bioessays 35 (3):173-182.
    Given their heterogeneity and lack of defining markers, it is surprising that multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have attracted so much translational attention, especially as increasing evidence points to their predominant effect being not by donor differentiation but via paracrine mediators and exosomes. Achieving long-term MSC donor chimerism for treatment of chronic disease remains a challenge, requiring enhanced MSC homing/engraftment properties and manipulation of niches to direct MSC behaviour. Meanwhile advances in nanoparticle technology are furthering the development of (...)
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  31.  6
    Melinda B. Fagan, Crucial Stem Cell Experiments? Stem Cells, Uncertainty, and Single-Cell Experiments.
    I have previously argued that stem cell experiments cannot demonstrate that a single cell is a stem cell. Laplane and others dispute this claim, citing experiments that identify stem cells at the single-cell level. This paper rebuts the counterexample, arguing that the alleged ‘crucial stem cell experiments’ do not measure self-renewal for a single cell, do not establish a single cell’s differentiation potential, and, if interpreted as providing results about single cells, fall into epistemic (...)
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  32.  57
    John Harris (2003). Stem Cells, Sex, and Procreation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):353-371.
    Sex is not the answer to everything, though young men think it is, but it may be the answer to the intractable debate over the ethics of human embryonic stem cell research. In this paper, I advance one ethical principle that, as yet, has not received the attention its platitudinous character would seem to merit. If found acceptable, this principle would permit the beneficial use of any embryonic or fetal tissue that would, by default, be lost or destroyed. More (...)
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  33.  10
    K. Devolder (2005). Creating and Sacrificing Embryos for Stem Cells. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):366-370.
    The compromise position that accepts the use and derivation of stem cells from spare in vitro fertilisation embryos but opposes the creation of embryos for these purposes is a very weak ethical position. This paper argues that whatever the basis is on which defenders of this viewpoint accord intrinsic value to the embryo, once they accept the creation and sacrifice of embryos to benefit infertile people with a child-wish, they do not have a sound moral argument to condemn (...)
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  34.  15
    Melinda Bonnie Fagan (2015). Crucial Stem Cell Experiments? Stem Cells, Uncertainty, and Single-Cell Experiments. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 30 (2):183-205.
    I have previously argued that stem cell experiments cannot demonstrate that a single cell is a stem cell. Laplane and others dispute this claim, citing experiments that identify stem cells at the singlecell level. This paper rebuts the counterexample, arguing that the alleged ‘crucial stem cell experiments’ do not measure self-renewal for a single cell, do not establish a single cell’s differentiation potential, and, if interpreted as providing results about single cells, fall into epistemic (...)
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  35.  6
    H.-W. Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.
    The recent discussions about alternative sources of human embryonic stem cells , while stirring new interest in the developmental potential of the various abnormal embryos or constructs proposed as such sources, also raise questions about the potential of the derived embryonic stem cells. The data on the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells that seem relevant for ethical considerations and aspects of patentability are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of “totipotency, omnipotency (...)
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  36. William B. Hurlbut (2006). Science, Religion, and the Politics of Stem Cells. Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (3):819-834.
    As America's debate over federal funding of embryonic stem cell research continues to deepen, it is increasingly characterized as a conflict between the objectivity of secular science and the cultural variability of traditional religion. Yet science alone, by the very limitations of its naturalistic methodology and domain of knowledge, is unable to draw its own moral boundaries. Through a careful consideration of the relationship between scientific knowledge and our most fundamental assumptions concerning the moral value of developing life, we (...)
     
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  37.  17
    William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (2):342-351.
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. (...)
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  38.  4
    C. R. Towns (2004). Stem Cells, Embryos, and the Environment: A Context for Both Science and Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):410-413.
    Debate on the potential and uses of human stem cells tends to be conducted by two constituencies—ethicists and scientists. On many occasions there is little communication between the two, with the result that ethical debate is not informed as well as it might be by scientific insights. The aim of this paper is to highlight those scientific insights that may be of relevance for ethical debate.Environmental factors play a significant role in identifying stem cells and their (...)
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  39.  12
    J. R. Meyer (2008). The Significance of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Basic Research and Clinical Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):849-851.
    It is argued that the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative therapy may soon be ethically practicable and could sidestep the various objections pertaining to other types of stem cell (human embryonic stem cells, and stem cells obtained by altered nuclear transfer or somatic cell nuclear transfer).
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  40.  32
    Jane Maienschein (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part II - What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12 – 19.
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem cells," (...)
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  41.  6
    J. R. Meyer (2000). Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Respect for Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):166-170.
    The purpose of this essay is to stimulate academic discussion about the ethical justification of using human primordial stem cells for tissue transplantation, cell replacement, and gene therapy. There are intriguing alternatives to using embryos obtained from elective abortions and in vitro fertilisation to reconstitute damaged or dysfunctional human organs. These include the expansion and transplantation of latent adult progenitor cells.
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  42.  27
    H. Busby (2010). The Meanings of Consent to the Donation of Cord Blood Stem Cells: Perspectives From an Interview-Based Study of a Public Cord Blood Bank in England. Clinical Ethics 5 (1):22-27.
    This paper explores the perspectives of women who have agreed that their umbilical cord blood may be collected for a public ‘cord blood bank’, for use in transplant medicine or research. Drawing on interview data from 27 mothers who agreed to the collection and use of their umbilical cord blood, these choices and the informed consent process are explored. It is shown that the needs of sick children requiring transplants are prominent in narrative accounts of cord blood banking, together with (...)
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  43.  17
    Jens Benninghoff, Hans-Jürgen Möller, Harald Hampel & Angelo Luigi Vescovi (2008). The Problem of Being a Paradigm: The Emergence of Neural Stem Cells as Example for “Kuhnian” Revolution in Biology or Misconception of the Scientific Community? Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):3-11.
    In a thought experiment we want to test how the emergence of adult neural stem cells could constitute an example for a scientific revolution in the sense of Thomas Kuhn. In his major work, The structure of scientific revolutions, 3rd edn, University of Chicago Press, Chicago (Kuhn 1996), the philosopher of science, Thomas Kuhn, states that scientific progress is not a cumulative process, but new theories appear by a rather revolutionary sequence of events. Kuhn built his theory on (...)
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  44.  6
    Norman Ford (2011). Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (4):4.
    Ford, Norman Many people think that the Catholic Church is morally opposed to all research and therapeutic use of stem cells. This is far from the truth. The Church is rightly morally opposed to all destructive use of human embryos to obtain pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but it is not opposed to pluripotent stem cells ethically derived from adult cells.
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  45.  5
    Norman Ford (2007). Stem Cells, Altered Nuclear Transfer & Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (3):9.
    Ford, Norman Once therapies using embryonic stem cells enter clinical practice, pressure will increase to find pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic purposes that are not derived from human embryos. This article explores several likely sources of such pluripotent cells.
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  46.  8
    T. Hviid Nielsen (2008). What Happened to the Stem Cells? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):852-857.
    Five partly successive and partly overlapping framings have dominated the public debate about human embryonic stem cells since they first were “derived” a decade ago. Geron Corporation staged the initial framings as 1) basic research and 2) medical hope, but these two were immediately refuted and opposed by 3) bioethical concerns, voiced by influential politicians and leaders of opinion. Thereafter, the research community presented adult stem cells and therapeutic cloning as 4) techno-fix solutions supposed to bypass (...)
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  47.  2
    Theo Mantamadiotis, Nikos Papalexis & Sebastian Dworkin (2012). CREB Signalling in Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells: Recent Developments and the Implications for Brain Tumour Biology. Bioessays 34 (4):293-300.
  48.  1
    Hans-Werner Denker (2006). Potentiality of Embryonic Stem Cells: An Ethical Problem Even with Alternative Stem Cell Sources. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):665-671.
    The recent discussions about alternative sources of human embryonic stem cells , while stirring new interest in the developmental potential of the various abnormal embryos or constructs proposed as such sources, also raise questions about the potential of the derived embryonic stem cells. The data on the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells that seem relevant for ethical considerations and aspects of patentability are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of “totipotency, omnipotency (...)
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  49.  1
    T. Hviid Nielsen (2008). What Happened to the Stem Cells? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):852-857.
    Five partly successive and partly overlapping framings have dominated the public debate about human embryonic stem cells since they first were “derived” a decade ago. Geron Corporation staged the initial framings as 1) basic research and 2) medical hope, but these two were immediately refuted and opposed by 3) bioethical concerns, voiced by influential politicians and leaders of opinion. Thereafter, the research community presented adult stem cells and therapeutic cloning as 4) techno-fix solutions supposed to bypass (...)
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  50.  1
    John R. Meyer (2008). The Significance of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Basic Research and Clinical Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):849-851.
    It is argued that the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative therapy may soon be ethically practicable and could sidestep the various objections pertaining to other types of stem cell.
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