Search results for 'Stem Cells' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Catherine Waldby, Ian Kerridge & Loane Skene (2012). Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):15-17.score: 90.0
    Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 15-17 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9351-x Authors Catherine Waldby, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Ian Kerridge, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Medical Foundation Building (K25), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Loane Skene, Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Studies, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VA, Australia Journal Journal of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Melinda Bonnie Fagan (2010). Stems and Standards: Social Interaction in the Search for Blood Stem Cells. Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):67 - 109.score: 90.0
    This essay examines the role of social interactions in the search for blood stem cells, in a recent episode of biomedical research. Linked to mid-20th century cell biology, genetics and radiation research, the search for blood stem cells coalesced in the 1960s and took a developmental turn in the late 1980s, with significant ramifications for immunology, stem cell and cancer biology. Like much contemporary biomedical research, this line of inquiry exhibits a complex social structure and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ioana Iancu & Delia Cristina Balaban (2009). Romanian Media Coverage on Bioethics. The Issue of Stem Cells. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):24.score: 90.0
    In the last decades, scientific developments are largely discussed and debated mainly at the media level. Based on the agenda setting model, the importance of a certain theme is given by the frequency of its appearances in mass-media. Within this context, this paper focuses on the issue of stem cells and its media coverage in Romania. Using content analysis of the most read national newspapers, the research aims to emphasize two relevant aspects: the stem cells issue (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Karen Lebacqz (2012). Stumbling on Status: Abortion, Stem Cells, and Faulty Reasoning. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):75-82.score: 90.0
    Common arguments from the abortion debate have set the stage for the debate on stem cell research. Unfortunately, those arguments demonstrate flawed reasoning—jumping to unfounded conclusions, using value laden language rather than careful argument, and ignoring morally relevant aspects of the situation. The influence of flawed abortion arguments on the stem cell debate results in failures of moral reasoning and in lack of attention to important morally relevant differences between abortion and human embryonic stem cells. Among (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David B. Resnik (2002). The Commercialization of Human Stem Cells: Ethical and Policy Issues. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):127-154.score: 87.0
    The first stage of the human embryonic stem(ES) cell research debate revolved aroundfundamental questions, such as whether theresearch should be done at all, what types ofresearch may be done, who should do theresearch, and how the research should befunded. Now that some of these questions arebeing answered, we are beginning to see thenext stage of the debate: the battle forproperty rights relating to human ES cells. The reason why property rights will be a keyissue in this debate is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nicolae Ovidiu Grad, Ionel Ciprian Pop & Ion Aurel Mironiuc (2012). Stem Cells Therapy and Research. Benefits and Ethical Challences. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (32):190-205.score: 82.0
    The research on stem cell-based therapies has greatly expanded in recent years. Our text attempts to seek those religious and ethical challenges that stem cell therapy and research bring into debate. Our thesis is that bioethics can defend its principle without a religious background. We will develop our argumentation on three major points: firstly, a comparison between secular ethics and religious views will clarify why stem cell therapy and research are important from a scientific point of view, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ronald K. F. Fung & Ian H. Kerridge (2013). Uncertain Translation, Uncertain Benefit and Uncertain Risk: Ethical Challenges Facing First-in-Human Trials of Induced Pluripotent Stem (Ips) Cells. Bioethics 27 (2):89-96.score: 79.0
    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Agata Sagan & Peter Singer (2007). The Moral Status of Stem Cells. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):264–284.score: 75.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Godfrey B. Tangwa (2007). Moral Status of Embryonic Stem Cells: Perspective of an African Villager. Bioethics 21 (8):449–457.score: 75.0
  10. Anna‐Marei Boehm, Philip Rosenstiel & Thomas Cg Bosch (2013). Stem Cells and Aging From a Quasi‐Immortal Point of View. Bioessays 35 (11):994-1003.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomas C. G. Bosch (2009). Hydra and the Evolution of Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (4):478-486.score: 75.0
  12. Earl Prinsloo, Mokgadi M. Setati, Victoria M. Longshaw & Gregory L. Blatch (2009). Chaperoning Stem Cells: A Role for Heat Shock Proteins in the Modulation of Stem Cell Self‐Renewal and Differentiation? Bioessays 31 (4):370-377.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael D. Green, Sarah Xl Huang & Hans‐Willem Snoeck (2013). Stem Cells of the Respiratory System: From Identification to Differentiation Into Functional Epithelium. Bioessays 35 (3):261-270.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Lucie Laplane (2011). Stem Cells and the Temporal Boundaries of Development: Toward a Species-Dependent View. Biological Theory 6 (1):48-58.score: 75.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Yves Maury, Morgane Gauthier, Marc Peschanski & Cécile Martinat (2012). Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modelling and Drug Screening. Bioessays 34 (1):61-71.score: 75.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Sean Vincent Murphy & Anthony Atala (2013). Organ Engineering – Combining Stem Cells, Biomaterials, and Bioreactors to Produce Bioengineered Organs for Transplantation. Bioessays 35 (3):163-172.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Tobias Schatton, Natasha Y. Frank & Markus H. Frank (2009). Identification and Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (10):1038-1049.score: 75.0
  18. C. Florian Bentzinger, Yu Xin Wang, Julia von Maltzahn & Michael A. Rudnicki (2013). The Emerging Biology of Muscle Stem Cells: Implications for Cell‐Based Therapies. Bioessays 35 (3):231-241.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Trevor A. Graham, Noor Jawad & Nicholas A. Wright (2010). Spindles Losing Their Bearings: Does Disruption of Orientation in Stem Cells Predict the Onset of Cancer? Bioessays 32 (6):468-472.score: 75.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Samer Mi Hussein, Judith Elbaz & Andras A. Nagy (2013). Genome Damage in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Assessing the Mechanisms and Their Consequences. Bioessays 35 (3):152-162.score: 75.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Dong‐Bo Ou, Hong‐Juan Lang, Rui Chen, Xiong‐Tao Liu & Qiang‐Sun Zheng (2009). Using Embryonic Stem Cells to Form a Biological Pacemaker Via Tissue Engineering Technology. Bioessays 31 (2):246-252.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Divya Rajamohan, Elena Matsa, Spandan Kalra, James Crutchley, Asha Patel, Vinoj George & Chris Denning (2013). Current Status of Drug Screening and Disease Modelling in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Bioessays 35 (3):281-298.score: 75.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Anna M. Wobus (2010). The Janus Face of Pluripotent Stem Cells – Connection Between Pluripotency and Tumourigenicity. Bioessays 32 (11):993-1002.score: 75.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Demetrio Neri (2011). The Race Toward 'Ethically Universally Acceptable' Human Pluripotent (Embryonic-Like) Stem Cells: Only a Problem of Sources? Bioethics 25 (5):260-266.score: 74.0
    Over the past few years, several proposals aimed at procuring human pluripotent (embryonic-like) stem cells without involving the destruction of a human embryo have been proposed and widely discussed. This article focuses on a basic aspect of the debate, namely the plausibility of one or more of these new proposals being able to meet the ethical requirements that those who regard the human embryo as sacred have tried to impose on stem cells research in the last (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.score: 73.0
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Melinda Cooper (2009). Regenerative Pathologies: Stem Cells, Teratomas and Theories of Cancer. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (1):55-66.score: 72.0
    What is now familiarly referred to as the ‘embryonic stem (ES) cell’ is a recent biological category whose origins lie in research into benign and malignant teratomas carried out in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. In these studies, the question of the normal or pathological character of the ES cell was a matter of considerable debate and indeed the term ES cell was often used interchangeably with that of the embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell. This article argues that the indecisiveness (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Susan M. Millard & Nicholas M. Fisk (2013). Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Systemic Therapy: Shotgun Approach or Magic Bullets? Bioessays 35 (3):173-182.score: 71.0
    Given their heterogeneity and lack of defining markers, it is surprising that multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have attracted so much translational attention, especially as increasing evidence points to their predominant effect being not by donor differentiation but via paracrine mediators and exosomes. Achieving long-term MSC donor chimerism for treatment of chronic disease remains a challenge, requiring enhanced MSC homing/engraftment properties and manipulation of niches to direct MSC behaviour. Meanwhile advances in nanoparticle technology are furthering the development of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Françoise Baylis (2009). For Love or Money? The Saga of Korean Women Who Provided Eggs for Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.score: 66.0
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid consents (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lawrence Burns (2009). “You Are Our Only Hope”: Trading Metaphorical “Magic Bullets” for Stem Cell “Superheroes”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):427-442.score: 66.0
    In the wake of two recent developments in stem cell research, it is a fitting time to reassess the claim that stem cells will radically transform the concept and function of medicine. The first is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision in January 2009 to approve Geron Corporation’s Phase I clinical trial using human embryonic stem cells for patients with spinal cord injuries. The second is the National Institutes of Health’s decision to permit federal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Andrew Fenton & Frederic Gilbert (2011). On the Use of Animals in Emergent Embryonic Stem Cell Research for Spinal Cord Injuries. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):37-45.score: 66.0
    In early 2009, President Obama overturned the ban on federal funding for research involving the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also approved Geron’s first-in-human hESC trial for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We anticipate an increase in both research in the United States to derive hESC and applications to the FDA for approval of clinical trials involving transplantation of hESCs. An increase of such clinical trials will require a concomitant increase (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Theo Mantamadiotis, Nikos Papalexis & Sebastian Dworkin (2012). CREB Signalling in Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells: Recent Developments and the Implications for Brain Tumour Biology. Bioessays 34 (4):293-300.score: 66.0
  32. Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings (2010). Ethical Aspects of the Use of Stem Cell Derived Gametes for Reproduction. Health Care Analysis 18 (3):267-278.score: 66.0
    A lot of interest has been generated by the possibility of deriving gametes from embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells. These stem cell derived gametes may become useful for research and for the treatment of infertility. In this article we consider prospectively the ethical issues that will arise if stem cell derived gametes are used in the clinic, making a distinction between concerns that only apply to embryonic stem cell derived gametes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Hossam E. Fadel (2012). Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review. Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.score: 60.0
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Streiffer (2005). At the Edge of Humanity: Human Stem Cells, Chimeras, and Moral Status. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):347-370.score: 60.0
    : Experiments involving the transplantation of human stem cells and their derivatives into early fetal or embryonic nonhuman animals raise novel ethical issues due to their possible implications for enhancing the moral status of the chimeric individual. Although status-enhancing research is not necessarily objectionable from the perspective of the chimeric individual, there are grounds for objecting to it in the conditions in which it is likely to occur. Translating this ethical conclusion into a policy recommendation, however, is complicated (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jane Maienschein (2002). Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part II - What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12 – 19.score: 60.0
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem cells," (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas V. Cunningham (2013). Skepticism About the “Convertibility” of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):40-42.score: 60.0
    No abstract available. First paragraph: In this issue’s target article, Stier and Schoene-Siefert purport to ‘depotentialize’ the argument from potentiality based on their claim that any human cell may be “converted” into a morally significant entity, and consequently, the argument from potentiality finally succumbs to a reductio ad absurdum. I aim to convey two reasons for skepticism about the innocuousness of the notion of cell convertibility, and hence, the cogency of their argument.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jens Benninghoff, Hans-Jürgen Möller, Harald Hampel & Angelo Luigi Vescovi (2008). The Problem of Being a Paradigm: The Emergence of Neural Stem Cells as Example for “Kuhnian” Revolution in Biology or Misconception of the Scientific Community? Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):3-11.score: 60.0
    In a thought experiment we want to test how the emergence of adult neural stem cells could constitute an example for a scientific revolution in the sense of Thomas Kuhn. In his major work, The structure of scientific revolutions, 3rd edn, University of Chicago Press, Chicago (Kuhn 1996), the philosopher of science, Thomas Kuhn, states that scientific progress is not a cumulative process, but new theories appear by a rather revolutionary sequence of events. Kuhn built his theory on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. William M. Sage (2010). Will Embryonic Stem Cells Change Health Policy? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):342-351.score: 60.0
    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. H. Busby (2010). The Meanings of Consent to the Donation of Cord Blood Stem Cells: Perspectives From an Interview-Based Study of a Public Cord Blood Bank in England. Clinical Ethics 5 (1):22-27.score: 60.0
    This paper explores the perspectives of women who have agreed that their umbilical cord blood may be collected for a public ‘cord blood bank’, for use in transplant medicine or research. Drawing on interview data from 27 mothers who agreed to the collection and use of their umbilical cord blood, these choices and the informed consent process are explored. It is shown that the needs of sick children requiring transplants are prominent in narrative accounts of cord blood banking, together with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. J. R. Meyer (2008). The Significance of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Basic Research and Clinical Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):849-851.score: 60.0
    It is argued that the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative therapy may soon be ethically practicable and could sidestep the various objections pertaining to other types of stem cell (human embryonic stem cells, and stem cells obtained by altered nuclear transfer or somatic cell nuclear transfer).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Norman Ford (2007). Stem Cells, Altered Nuclear Transfer & Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (3):9.score: 60.0
    Ford, Norman Once therapies using embryonic stem cells enter clinical practice, pressure will increase to find pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic purposes that are not derived from human embryos. This article explores several likely sources of such pluripotent cells.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. T. Hviid Nielsen (2008). What Happened to the Stem Cells? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):852-857.score: 60.0
    Five partly successive and partly overlapping framings have dominated the public debate about human embryonic stem cells since they first were “derived” a decade ago. Geron Corporation staged the initial framings as 1) basic research and 2) medical hope, but these two were immediately refuted and opposed by 3) bioethical concerns, voiced by influential politicians and leaders of opinion. Thereafter, the research community presented adult stem cells and therapeutic cloning as 4) techno-fix solutions supposed to bypass (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Norman Ford (2011). Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (4):4.score: 60.0
    Ford, Norman Many people think that the Catholic Church is morally opposed to all research and therapeutic use of stem cells. This is far from the truth. The Church is rightly morally opposed to all destructive use of human embryos to obtain pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but it is not opposed to pluripotent stem cells ethically derived from adult cells.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Nicholas Agar (2007). Embryonic Potential and Stem Cells. Bioethics 21 (4):198–207.score: 59.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jean‐François Mayol, Corinne Loeuillet, Francis Hérodin & Didier Wion (2009). Characterisation of Normal and Cancer Stem Cells: One Experimental Paradigm for Two Kinds of Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (9):993-1001.score: 59.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Kunihiko Kaneko (2011). Characterization of Stem Cells and Cancer Cells on the Basis of Gene Expression Profile Stability, Plasticity, and Robustness. Bioessays 33 (6):403-413.score: 59.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Roman J. Krawetz, Xiangyun Li & Derrick E. Rancourt (2009). Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Caught Between a ROCK Inhibitor and a Hard Place. Bioessays 31 (3):336-343.score: 59.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jean‐Pierre Levesque, Ingrid G. Winkler & John Ej Rasko (2013). Nichotherapy for Stem Cells: There Goes the Neighborhood. Bioessays 35 (3):183-190.score: 59.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Maho Shibata & Michael M. Shen (2013). The Roots of Cancer: Stem Cells and the Basis for Tumor Heterogeneity. Bioessays 35 (3):253-260.score: 59.0
  50. Jeff Mcmahan (2007). Killing Embryos for Stem Cell Research. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):170–189.score: 58.0
    The main objection to human embryonic stem cell research is that it involves killing human embryos, which are essentially beings of the same sort that you and I are. This objection presupposes that we once existed as early embryos and that we had the same moral status then that we have now. This essay challenges both those presuppositions, but focuses primarily on the first. I argue first that these presuppositions are incompatible with widely accepted beliefs about both assisted conception (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999