30 found
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  1. David K. Sewell, Daniel R. Little & Stephan Lewandowsky (2011). Bayesian Computation and Mechanism: Theoretical Pluralism Drives Scientific Emergence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):212-213.
    The breadth-first search adopted by Bayesian researchers to map out the conceptual space and identify what the framework can do is beneficial for science and reflective of its collaborative and incremental nature. Theoretical pluralism among researchers facilitates refinement of models within various levels of analysis, which ultimately enables effective cross-talk between different levels of analysis.
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  2. Stephan Lewandowsky & Klaus Oberauer (2015). Rehearsal in Serial Recall: An Unworkable Solution to the Nonexistent Problem of Decay. Psychological Review 122 (4):674-699.
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  3.  15
    Stephan Lewandowsky, Klaus Oberauer & Gordon D. A. Brown (2009). No Temporal Decay in Verbal Short-Term Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):120-126.
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  4.  9
    John Cook & Stephan Lewandowsky (2016). Rational Irrationality: Modeling Climate Change Belief Polarization Using Bayesian Networks. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):160-179.
    Belief polarization is said to occur when two people respond to the same evidence by updating their beliefs in opposite directions. This response is considered to be “irrational” because it involves contrary updating, a form of belief updating that appears to violate normatively optimal responding, as for example dictated by Bayes' theorem. In light of much evidence that people are capable of normatively optimal behavior, belief polarization presents a puzzling exception. We show that Bayesian networks, or Bayes nets, can simulate (...)
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  5.  12
    Stephan Lewandowsky, Thomas L. Griffiths & Michael L. Kalish (2009). The Wisdom of Individuals: Exploring People's Knowledge About Everyday Events Using Iterated Learning. Cognitive Science 33 (6):969-998.
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  6.  11
    Stephan Lewandowsky (2016). Future Global Change and Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):7-18.
    The 11 articles in this issue explore how people respond to climate change and other global challenges. The articles pursue three broad strands of enquiry that relate to the effects and causes of “skepticism” about climate change, the purely cognitive challenges that are posed by a complex scientific issue, and the ways in which climate change can be communicated to a wider audience. Cognitive science can contribute to understanding people's responses to global challenges in many ways, and it may also (...)
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  7.  31
    Thomas L. Griffiths, Stephan Lewandowsky & Michael L. Kalish (2013). The Effects of Cultural Transmission Are Modulated by the Amount of Information Transmitted. Cognitive Science 37 (5):953-967.
    Information changes as it is passed from person to person, with this process of cultural transmission allowing the minds of individuals to shape the information that they transmit. We present mathematical models of cultural transmission which predict that the amount of information passed from person to person should affect the rate at which that information changes. We tested this prediction using a function-learning task, in which people learn a functional relationship between two variables by observing the values of those variables. (...)
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  8. Klaus Oberauer & Stephan Lewandowsky (2008). Forgetting in Immediate Serial Recall: Decay, Temporal Distinctiveness, or Interference? Psychological Review 115 (3):544-576.
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  9.  9
    Klaus Oberauer & Stephan Lewandowsky (2013). Evidence Against Decay in Verbal Working Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):380.
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  10.  10
    Gordon Da Brown & Stephan Lewandowsky (2010). 4 Forgetting in Memory Models. In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Forgetting. Psychology Press
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  11.  15
    Stephan Lewandowsky, Tarryn Wright & Gordon Da Brown (2007). The Interpretation of Temporal Isolation Effects. In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. OUP Oxford
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  12.  13
    Stephan Lewandowsky, Klaus Oberauer & Gordon D. A. Brown (2009). Response to Altmann: Adaptive Forgetting by Decay or Removal of STM Contents? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):280-281.
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  13. Stephan Lewandowsky & Bennet B. Murdock (1989). Memory for Serial Order. Psychological Review 96 (1):25-57.
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  14.  4
    Shu-Chen Li, Stephan Lewandowsky & Victor E. DeBrunner (1996). Using Parameter Sensitivity and Interdependence to Predict Model Scope and Falsifiability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (4):360.
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  15.  4
    Stephan Lewandowsky, Klaus Oberauer & Gordon D. A. Brown (2009). Response to Barrouillet and Camos: Interference or Decay in Working Memory? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):146-147.
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  16.  2
    Stephan Lewandowsky (1992). Unified Cognitive Theory: Having One's Apple Pie and Eating It. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):449-450.
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  17. Stephan Lewandowsky, Michael Kalish & S. K. Ngang (2002). Simplified Learning in Complex Situations: Knowledge Partitioning in Function Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (2):163-193.
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  18.  22
    Simon Farrell & Stephan Lewandowsky (2000). The Case Against Distributed Representations: Lack of Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):476-477.
    We focus on two components of Page's argument in favour of localist representations in connectionist networks: First, we take issue with the claim that localist representations can give rise to generalisation and show that whenever generalisation occurs, distributed representations are involved. Second, we counter the alleged shortcomings of distributed representations and show that their properties are preferable to those of localist approaches.
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  19.  3
    Stephan Lewandowsky & Murray Maybery (1998). The Critics Rebutted: A Pyrrhic Victory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):210-211.
    We take up two issues discussed by Chow: the claim by critics of hypothesis testing that the null hypothesis (H0) is always false, and the claim that reporting effect sizes is more appropriate than relying on statistical significance. Concerning the former, we agree with Chow's sentiment despite noting serious shortcomings in his discussion. Concerning the latter, we agree with Chow that effect size need not translate into scientific relevance, and furthermore reiterate that with small samples effect size measures cannot substitute (...)
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  20.  2
    Ullrich K. H. Ecker, Gordon D. A. Brown & Stephan Lewandowsky (2015). Memory Without Consolidation: Temporal Distinctiveness Explains Retroactive Interference. Cognitive Science 39 (7):1570-1593.
    Is consolidation needed to account for retroactive interference in free recall? Interfering mental activity during the retention interval of a memory task impairs performance, in particular if the interference occurs in temporal proximity to the encoding of the to-be-remembered information. There are at least two rival theoretical accounts of this temporal gradient of retroactive interference. The cognitive neuroscience literature has suggested neural consolidation is a pivotal factor determining item recall. According to this account, interfering activity interrupts consolidation processes that would (...)
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  21.  2
    Stephan Lewandowsky & Simon Farrell (2003). Working Memory, Computational Models Of. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group
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  22. Ullrich K. H. Ecker & Stephan Lewandowsky (2012). Computational Constraints in Cognitive Theories of Forgetting. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  23. Ullrich K. H. Ecker, Stephan Lewandowsky, Ee Pin Chang & Rekha Pillai (2014). The Effects of Subtle Misinformation in News Headlines. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 20 (4):323-335.
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  24. Michael L. Kalish, Stephan Lewandowsky & John K. Kruschke (2004). Population of Linear Experts: Knowledge Partitioning and Function Learning. Psychological Review 111 (4):1072-1099.
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  25. Stephan Lewandowsky (1995). Base-Rate Neglect in ALCOVE: A Critical Reevaluation. Psychological Review 102 (1):185-191.
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  26. Stephan Lewandowsky (1998). Implicit Learning and Memory: Science, Fiction, and a Prospectus. In K. Kirsner & G. Speelman (eds.), Implicit and Explicit Mental Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum 373--391.
     
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  27. Stephan Lewandowsky & Shu-Chen Li (1994). Memory for Serial Order Revisited. Psychological Review 101 (3):539-543.
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  28. Stephan Lewandowsky, Michael Mundy & Gerard P. A. Tan (2000). The Dynamics of Trust: Comparing Humans to Automation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 6 (2):104-123.
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  29. Stephan Lewandowsky, Tarryn Wright & Brown & D. A. Gordon (2007). The Interpretation of Temporal Isolation Effects. In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. OUP Oxford
     
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  30. David K. Sewell & Stephan Lewandowsky (2012). Attention and Working Memory Capacity: Insights From Blocking, Highlighting, and Knowledge Restructuring. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):444-469.
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