Search results for 'Stephen A. Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Clark (1996). La Contribution de Stephen Clark À la Philosophie Sur Internet. Horizons Philosophiques 6 (2):95.
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    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 58 (224):215-227.
    Philosophers of earlier ages have usually spent time in considering thenature of marital, and in general familial, duty. Paley devotes an entire book to those ‘relative duties which result from the constitution of the sexes’,1 a book notable on the one hand for its humanity and on the other for Paley‘s strange refusal to acknowledge that the evils for which he condemns any breach of pure monogamy are in large part the result of the fact that such breaches are generally (...)
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  3. Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Orwell and the Anti-Realists: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 67 (260):141-154.
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
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    Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Where Have All the Angels Gone?1: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 28 (2):221-234.
    Anyone who wishes to talk about angels has to respond to the mocking question, how many of them can dance on the point of a pin. The answer is: ‘just as many as they please’. Angels being immaterial intellects do not occupy space to the exclusion of any other such intellectual substance, and their being ‘on’ the point of a pin can only mean that they attend to it. The question, however, is not one that concerned our mediaeval predecessors, although (...)
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  5. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). How Many Selves Make Me?1: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:213-233.
    Cartesian accounts of the mental make it axiomatic that consciousness is transparent: what I feel, I know I feel, however many errors I may make about its cause. ‘I’ names a simple, unextended, irreducible substance, created ex nihilo or eternally existent, and only associated with the complete, extended, dissoluble substance or pretend-substance that is ‘my’ body by divine fiat. Good moderns take it for granted that ‘we’ now realize how shifting, foggy and deconstructible are the boundaries of the self; ‘we’ (...)
     
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  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). The Better Part: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:29-49.
    According to Aristotle, the goal of anyone who is not simply stupid or slavish is to live a worthwhile life. There are, no doubt, people who have no goal at all beyond the moment's pleasure or release from pain. There may be people incapable of reaching any reasoned decision about what to do, and acting on it. But anyone who asks how she should live implicitly agrees that her goal is to live well, to live a life that she can (...)
     
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  7.  1
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). World Religions and World Orders: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 26 (1):43-57.
    There are good reasons for being suspicious of the very concept of ‘a religion’, let alone a ‘world religion’. It may be useful for a hospital administrator to know a patient's ‘religion’ – as Protestant or Church of England or Catholic or Buddhist – but such labels clearly do little more than identify the most suitable chaplain, and connote groupings in the vast and confusing region of ‘religious thought and practice’ that are of very different ranks. By any rational, genealogical (...)
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  8. Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Descartes' Debt to Augustine: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:73-88.
    Jonathan Edwards identified the central act of faith as ‘the cordial consent of beings to Being in general’, which is to say to God . That equation, of Being, Truth and God, is rarely taken seriously in analytical circles. My argument will be that this is to neglect the real context of a great deal of past philosophy, particularly the very Cartesian arguments from which so many undergraduate courses begin. All too many students issue from such courses immunized against enthusiasm, (...)
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  9. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). The Limits of Explanation: Limited Explanations: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:195-210.
    When I was first approached to read a paper at the conference from which this volume takes its beginning I expected that Flint Schier, with whom I had taught a course on the Philosophy of Biology in my years at Glasgow, would be with us to comment and to criticize. I cannot let this occasion pass without expressing once again my own sense of loss. I am sure that we would all have gained by his presence, and hope that he (...)
     
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  10. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). Tools, Machines and Marvels: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:159-176.
    Technology, according to Derry and Williams's Short History , ‘comprises all that bewilderingly varied body of knowledge and devices by which man progressively masters his natural environment’. Their casual, and unconscious, sexism is not unrelated to my present topic. Women enter the story as spinners, burden bearers and, at long last, typists. ‘The tying of a bundle on the back or the dragging of it along upon the outspread twigs of a convenient branch are contributions [and by implication the only (...)
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  11.  7
    Jeremy Black, Graham Cunningham, Eleanor Robson, Gábor Zólyomi, Leslie Brubaker, Julia Mh Smith, Claude Calame, Silvio Cataldi, Angelos Chaniotis & Randall Baldwin Clark (2005). Alter, Stephen G. William Dwight Whitney and the Science of Language. Balti-More: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005. Xvi+ 339 Pp. Cloth, $49.95. Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos Napoleonta, Ed. Pindãrou ÉOlumpiÒnikoi. From Codices 1062 and 1081 of The National Library of Greece, with Facsimiles of the Codices, Prefatory Material and Commentary, a Trans. Into English by William H. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 126:469-473.
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  12. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). Abstract Morality, Concrete Cases: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:35-53.
    Practitioners of disciplines whose problems are debated by moral philosophers regularly complain that the philosophers are engaged in abstract speculation, divorced from ‘real-life’ consequences and responsibilities, that it is the practitioners who must take the decisions, and that they cannot act in accordance with strict abstract logic.
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  13.  1
    George Clark (1980). Howell D. Chickering Jr., Ed. And Trans., Beowulf. A Dual-Language Edition. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press, 1977. Paper. Pp. Xiii, 390. $4.95. T. A. Shippey, Beowulf. London: Edward Arnold, 1978. Pp. 64. £3.95 ; £1.95 . Henry Sweet, A Second Anglo-Saxon Reader: Archaic and Dialectal. Second Edition, Revised by T. F. Hoad. Oxford, Eng.: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 1978. Pp. Xii, 237. $18.50 ; £4.95 . First Published in 1887. George Clark. [REVIEW] Speculum 55 (4):779-783.
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    Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's (...)
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  15.  51
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  16. Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). Animals and Their Moral Standing. Routledge.
    Twenty years ago, people thought only cranks or sentimentalists could be seriously concerned about the treatment of non-human animals. However, since then philosophers, scientists and welfarists have raised public awareness of the issue; and they have begun to lay the foundations for an enormous change in human practice. This book is a record of the development of 'animal rights' through the eyes of one highly-respected and well-known thinker. This book brings together for the first time Stephen R.L. Clark's (...)
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  17. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). A Parliament of Souls. Oxford University Press.
    This second volume in the Limits and Renewals trilogy is an attempt to restate a traditional philosophy of mind, drawing on philosophical and poetical resources that are often neglected in modern and postmodern thought, and emphasizing the moral and political implications of differing philosophies of mind and value. Clark argues that without the traditional concept of the soul, we have little reason to believe that rational thought and individual autonomy are either possible or desirable. The particular topics covered include (...)
     
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  18. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). God's World and the Great Awakening. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen R.L. Clark defends the primary faith of humankind, that there is a real world which is more than a shadow of our desires and fancies, and which can be discovered through right reason. Focusing on the way in which we can "turn aside" to the Truth from the normal delusions of self-concern, Clark offers a properly worked, Platonic metaphysics as the key to identifying that reality. This book is the final volume of Limits (...)
     
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  19.  17
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2006). G.K.Chesterton: Thinking Backward, Looking Forward. Templeton Foundation Press.
    Offering a detailed study of early 20th-century essayist, poet, novelist, political campaigner, and theologian G.K. Chesterton, author Stephen R.L. Clark ...
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  20. Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of (...)
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  21. Stephen R. L. Clark & Stephen Clark (2008). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of (...)
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  22. Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics and Politics. Routledge.
    People, as Aristotle said, are political animals. Mainstream political philosophy, however, has largely neglected humankind's animal nature as beings who are naturally equipped, and inclined, to reason and work together, create social bonds and care for their young. Stephen Clark, grounded in biological analysis and traditional ethics, probes into areas ignored in mainstream political theory and argues for the significance of social bonds which bypass or transcend state authority. Understanding the ties that bind us reveals how enormously capable (...)
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  23. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). The Political Animal: Biology, Ethics and Politics. Routledge.
    People, as Aristotle said, are political animals. Mainstream political philosophy, however, has largely neglected humankind's animal nature as beings who are naturally equipped, and inclined, to reason and work together, create social bonds and care for their young. Stephen Clark, grounded in biological analysis and traditional ethics, probes into areas ignored in mainstream political theory and argues for the significance of social bonds which bypass or transcend state authority. Understanding the ties that bind us reveals how enormously capable (...)
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  24.  28
    Stephen A. Clark (2000). Revealed Preference and Expected Utility. Theory and Decision 49 (2):159-174.
    This essay gives necessary and sufficient conditions for recovering expected utility from choice behavior in several popular models of uncertainty. In particular, these techniques handle a finite state model; a model for which the choice space consists of probability densities and the expected utility representation requires bounded, measurable utility; and a model for which the choice space consists of Borel probability measures and the expected utility representation requires bounded, continuous utility. The key result is the identification of the continuity condition (...)
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  25.  4
    Kevin D. Clark, Narda R. Quigley & Stephen A. Stumpf (2013). The Influence of Decision Frames and Vision Priming on Decision Outcomes in Work Groups: Motivating Stakeholder Considerations. Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):1-12.
    Organizational leaders are increasingly emphasizing a stakeholder perspective in order to address concerns about business ethics. This study examined the choices of 94 groups in the context of a business decision-making simulation to determine how specific actions and communications can facilitate the consideration of different stakeholder perspectives. In particular, we examined whether generally framing the business situation as one involving diverse stakeholders versus a primarily profit-driven operation (referred to as framing), and whether specific suggestions that participants consider the concerns of (...)
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  26.  31
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are entitled (...)
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  27.  11
    Stephen Clark (2003). What's in a Name? The Philosophers' Magazine 23 (23):43-45.
    A brief discussion of the differences between catarrhines and platyrrhines, as these are conceived in the practice of UK animal experimentalists: I conclude that there are no adequate objective differences sufficient to warrant different treatment, and that the historical and subjective differences lie behind the lesser standing given to platyrrhines (that is, New World monkeys) over against their cousins (Old World monkeys, apes, and us).
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    Mark J. Clark (2007). Stephen Langton and Hugh of St. Cher on Peter Comestor'sHistoria Scholastica. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 74 (1):63-117.
    In this article, I explore preliminarily whether Peter Comestor’s Historia scholastica was well suited to extended theological inquiry. After providing a brief introduction to Comestor’s method to acquaint the reader with the literary character of the History, I turn my attention to the use by Stephen Langton and Hugh of St. Cher, two prominent commentators on the History, of source material that Comestor himself used in composing the History. I pay particular attention to the Lombard’s Sentences, the most important (...)
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  29. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Decent Conduct Toward Animals: A Traditional Approach. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):61-83.
    The Bishop of Questoriana has recently asked for a pontifical document ‘furnishing a doctrinal foundation of love and respect for life existing on the earth’. Mainstream moralists have urged, since the Axial Era, that it is human life that most demands love and respect. We realize and perfect our own humanity by recognizing humanity in every other, of whatever creed or race. Realizing that biological species are not natural kinds, more recent moralists have hoped to found moral decency either on (...)
     
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  30. Michael Chase, Stephen R. L. Clark & Michael McGhee (eds.) (2013). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Ancients and Moderns - Essays in Honor of Pierre Hadot. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This unique collection of essays on the late Pierre Hadot’s revolutionary approach to studying and practising philosophy traces the links between his work and that of thinkers from Wittgenstein to the French postmodernists. It shows how his secular spiritual exercises expand our horizons, enabling us to be in a fuller, more authentic way. Comprehensive treatment of a neglected theme: philosophy’s practical relevance in our lives Interdisciplinary analysis reflects the wide influence of Hadot’s thought Explores the links between Hadot’s ideas and (...)
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  31. Michael Chase, Stephen R. L. Clark & Michael McGhee (eds.) (2013). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Ancients and Moderns - Essays in Honor of Pierre Hadot. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This unique collection of essays on the late Pierre Hadot’s revolutionary approach to studying and practising philosophy traces the links between his work and that of thinkers from Wittgenstein to the French postmodernists. It shows how his secular spiritual exercises expand our horizons, enabling us to be in a fuller, more authentic way. Comprehensive treatment of a neglected theme: philosophy’s practical relevance in our lives Interdisciplinary analysis reflects the wide influence of Hadot’s thought Explores the links between Hadot’s ideas and (...)
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  32.  5
    Michael Chase, Stephen R. L. Clark & Michael McGhee (eds.) (2013). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Ancients and Moderns - Essays in Honor of Pierre Hadot. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This unique collection of essays on the late Pierre Hadot’s revolutionary approach to studying and practising philosophy traces the links between his work and that of thinkers from Wittgenstein to the French postmodernists. It shows how his secular spiritual exercises expand our horizons, enabling us to be in a fuller, more authentic way. Comprehensive treatment of a neglected theme: philosophy’s practical relevance in our lives Interdisciplinary analysis reflects the wide influence of Hadot’s thought Explores the links between Hadot’s ideas and (...)
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  33. Michael Chase, Stephen R. L. Clark & Michael McGhee (eds.) (2013). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Ancients and Moderns - Essays in Honor of Pierre Hadot. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This unique collection of essays on the late Pierre Hadot’s revolutionary approach to studying and practising philosophy traces the links between his work and that of thinkers from Wittgenstein to the French postmodernists. It shows how his secular spiritual exercises expand our horizons, enabling us to be in a fuller, more authentic way. Comprehensive treatment of a neglected theme: philosophy’s practical relevance in our lives Interdisciplinary analysis reflects the wide influence of Hadot’s thought Explores the links between Hadot’s ideas and (...)
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  34.  11
    Stephen A. Clark (1993). Revealed Preference and Linear Utility. Theory and Decision 34 (1):21-45.
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    Curtis W. McIntyre, David Watson, Lee Anna Clark & Stephen A. Cross (1991). The Effect of Induced Social Interaction on Positive and Negative Affect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):67-70.
  36.  4
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). Atheism Considered as a Christian Sect. Philosophy 90 (2):277-303.
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  37. Peter A. Clark, Justin Eisenman & Stephen Szapor (2010). Surgical Vaccine : Should Male Circumcision Be Mandatory in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Tyler N. Pace (ed.), Bioethics: Issues and Dilemmas. Nova Science Publishers
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  38.  8
    Mary Midgley & Stephen R. L. Clark (1980). The Absence of a Gap Between Facts and Values. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54:207 - 240.
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  39.  23
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1998). Dangerous Conservatives: A Reply to Daniel Dombrowski. Sophia 37 (2):44-69.
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    Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). Animal Rights Daniel A. Dombrowski: The Philosophy of Vegetarianism. Pp. Iv+188. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1984. $20.00 (Paper, 9.95). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):224-225.
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  41.  7
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1997). A Plotinian Account of Intellect. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (3):421-432.
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  42.  1
    Mohamed A. Elemraid, Stephen P. Rushton, Matthew F. Thomas, David A. Spencer, Katherine M. Eastham, Andrew R. Gennery & Julia E. Clark (2014). Changing Clinical Practice: Management of Paediatric Community‐Acquired Pneumonia. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):94-99.
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  43.  8
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). A New Stoicism by Lawrence C. Becker. Princeton University Press: Princeton, New Jersey, 1998, 272pp; ISBN 0 691 01660 7 £22.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.
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  44.  1
    Stephen Clark (1990). Soft as the Rustle of a Reed From Cloyne. In Peter Gilmour (ed.), Philosophers of the Enlightenment. Barnes & Noble Books 47.
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  45. Stephen Clark (1999). A New Stoicism. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.
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  46. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). Form and Transformation: A Study in the Philosophy of Plotinus. Philosophical Books 36 (1):40-42.
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  47. Stephen R. L. Clark (2012). The Ethics of Taxonomy: A Neo-Aristotelian Synthesis. In Evangelos D. Protopapadakis (ed.), Animal Ethics: Past and Present Perspectives. Logos Verlag
    How the 'Aristotelian' biological synthesis has been affected by modern accounts of biological evolution, and the relation of taxonomy to ethics.
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  48. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will". Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, (...)
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  49.  6
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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  50.  1
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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