Search results for 'Stephen Baier' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. C. Baier (2012). Meaning in Life and Why It Matters, by Susan Wolf, with an Introduction by Stephen Macedo, Comments by John Koethe, Robert M. Adams, Nomy Arpaly, and Jonathan Haidt, and Responses by Susan Wolf. Mind 120 (480):1330-1331.score: 240.0
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  2. T. J. Blakeley, Edward M. Swiderski, Benjamin Braude & Stephen Baier (1982). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 23 (1):77-90.score: 240.0
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  3. James Allan, Robert F. Anderson, Shane Andre, Pall S. Ardal, R. F. Atkinson, Luigi Bagolini, Annette Baier, Stephen Barker, Marcia Baron & Donald L. M. Baxter (1993). An Index of Hume Studies: 1975-1993. Hume Studies 19 (2):327-364.score: 240.0
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  4. Annette C. Baier & Anik Waldow (2008). A Conversation Between Annette Baier and Anik Waldow About Hume's Account of Sympathy. Hume Studies 34 (1):61-87.score: 120.0
  5. Annette Baier (2009). Kinds of Virtue Theorist: A Response to Christine Swanton Annette Baier. In Charles R. Pigden (ed.), Hume on Motivation and Virtue: New Essays. Palgrave Macmillan. 249.score: 120.0
     
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  6. Kurt Baier (1962). Pains. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (May):1-23.score: 90.0
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  7. Kurt Baier (1962). Smart on Sensations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (May):57-68.score: 90.0
     
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  8. Giorgio Agamben, Luca D'Isanto & Kevin Attell (2010). Angle, Stephen C., Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Pp. Xvi+ 293,£ 45.00. Baier, Annette C., Reflections on How We Live, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010, Pp. Xi+ 275,£ 25.00. [REVIEW] Mind 119:473.score: 72.0
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  9. Charles Pigden (ed.) (2010). Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    It ‘seems altogether inconceivable', says Hume, that this ‘new relation' ought ‘can be a deduction' from others ‘which are entirely different from it' The idea that you can't derive an Ought from an Is, moral conclusions from non-moral premises, has proved enormously influential. But what did Hume mean by this famous dictum? Was he correct? How does it fit in with the rest of his philosophy? And what does this suggest about the nature of moral judgements? This collection, the first (...)
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  10. Edwin B. Allaire, Peter Carruthers, B. Allaire, John Charvet, Terry Pinkard, Gerald A. Cohen, Stephen Darwall, Herbert A. Davidson, William Demopoulos & Fred Dretske (1997). BAIER, KURT, The Rational and the Moral Order: The Social Roots of Reason and Morality, Reviewed by Sarah Stroud.. 577. Philosophical Review 106 (4).score: 24.0
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  11. Stephen A. Green (1994). Annette Baier and the Context of Risk. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):59-65.score: 24.0
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  12. Steven M. Cahn & Peter J. Markie (eds.) (2009). Ethics: History, Theory, and, Contemporary Issues. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, Ethics: History, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, Third Edition, is organized into three parts, providing instructors with flexibility in designing and teaching a variety of courses in moral philosophy. The first part, Historical Sources, moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and Epictetus) through medieval views (Augustine and Aquinas) to modern theories (Hobbes, Butler, Hume, Kant, Bentham, and Mill), culminating with leading nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers (Nietzsche, James, Dewey, Camus, and Sartre). The second part, (...)
     
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  13. Charles R. Pigden (ed.) (2009). Hume on Motivation and Virtue: New Essays. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Contemporary ethical thought owes a great deal to David Hume whose work has inspired theories as diverse as non-cognitivism, error theory, quasi-realism, and instrumentalism about practical reason. This timely volume brings together an international range of distinguished scholars to discuss and dispute issues revolving around three closely related Humean themes which have recently come under close scrutiny. First is Hume's infamous claim that 'Reason is, and ought only to be, the slave of the passions'. Second, the Motivation (or Influence) Argument (...)
     
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  14. Daan Evers (2013). Weight for Stephen Finlay. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.score: 18.0
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
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  15. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Stephen Jay Gould. In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.score: 18.0
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
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  16. Stephen Makin (2000). Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.score: 15.0
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
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  17. Aaron Allen Schiller (2009). Colorblindness and Black Friends in Stephen Colbert’s America. In , Stephen Colbert and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 15.0
    Is there a contradiction in Stephen Colbert’s attitudes towards race? How can he consistently claim to be colorblind and yet hold a national search for a new "black friend"? I argue that Stephen is trying to claim rights and shirk responsibilities on matters of race relations in America, and that his famous notion of "truthiness" is an extension of this attitude to other areas of social and political discourse.
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  18. Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) (2011). Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown. Brill.score: 15.0
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
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  19. J. J. C. Smart (1962). Brain Processes and Incorrigibility - a Reply to Professor Baier. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (May):68-70.score: 15.0
     
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  20. Graham Oppy (1995). Professor William Craig's Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.score: 12.0
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
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  21. Thaddeus Metz (2005). Critical Notice:Baier and Cottingham on the Meaning of Life. Disputatio 1 (19):215-228.score: 12.0
    I examine two recent books by analytic philosophers that address the underexplored topic of whether the meaning of life depends on the existence of a supernatural realm including God and a soul. John Cottingham’s On the Meaning of Life defends a supernaturalist conception of life’s meaning, whereas Kurt Baier’s Problems of Life and Death defends the opposite, naturalist perspective. I show that their respective arguments are worth serious consideration, indicate some potential weaknesses in them, and suggest some other argumentative (...)
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  22. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):27-38.score: 12.0
    I argue that Stephen Houlgate misstates an element in the Kantian background to my reading of “Lordship and Bondage” (§2). He misreads my remarks about the need to see Hegel’s moves there in the context of the progression towards absolute knowing (§3), and, partly consequently, he fails to engage with the motivation for my reading (§4). And he does not understand the way my reading exploits the concept of allegory (§5).
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  23. Jonardon Ganeri (2010). The Study of Indian Epistemology: Questions of Method—a Reply to Matthew Dasti and Stephen H. Phillips. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):541-550.score: 12.0
    I would like to thank the editors of Philosophy East and West for courteously asking me if I would like to respond to Matthew Dasti and Stephen Phillips' very thoughtful remarks about the review I wrote of Phillips' translation and commentary on the pratyakṣa chapter of Gaṅgeśa's Tattvacintāmaṇi, prepared in collaboration with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya (Phillips and Tatacharya 2004). Let me begin by reaffirming what I said at the beginning of my review, that the book is "a monumental (...)
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  24. Stephen Darwall (2009). The Second-Person Standpoint An Interview with Stephen Darwall. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):118-138.score: 12.0
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  25. Justin Tiwald (2011). Stephen C. Angle: Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):231-235.score: 12.0
    Review of Stephen C. Angle's Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.
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  26. A. Max Jarvie (2007). Unwrinkling the Carpet of Meaning: Stephen Schiffer, the Things We Mean. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):85-99.score: 12.0
    This article is a critical review of Stephen Schiffer’s monograph The Things We Mean . The text discusses some novel contributions made by Schiffer to the philosophy of meaning, in particular, Schiffer’s proposal for the reification of certain abstract entities and the application of his argument to the philosophical problem of vagueness in natural language. Special attention is paid both to Schiffer’s ingenious use of the notion of conservative extension , here employed as a criterion for distinguishing legitimate from (...)
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  27. Peter Pagin (2005). Review of Stephen Schiffer, The Things We Mean. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).score: 12.0
    After Meaning, 1972, and The Remnants of Meaning , 1987, The Things We Mean is Stephen Schiffer's third major work on the foundations of the theory of linguistic meaning. In simplest possible outline, the development started with a positive attempt to base a meaning theory on a modified Gricean account of utterance meaning, but took a negative turn, with the problems of belief sentences as a major reason for thinking that a systematic (compositional) semantic theory for natural language was (...)
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  28. William Dembski, An Analysis of Homer Simpson and Stephen Jay Gould.score: 12.0
    Note: The Simpson's, television's popular prime-time cartoon known for its satirical commentary on various social issues, recently took a shot at the creation-evolution debate by featuring Stephen Jay Gould prominently in one of its episodes. Here is Bill Dembski's review and observations of that episode.
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  29. Jaroslav Peregrin, Stephen Neale, Facing Facts, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001, Xv + 254 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 12.0
    It is now often taken for granted that facts are entia non grata, for there exists a powerful argument (dubbed the slingshot), which is backed by such great names as Frege or Gödel or Davidson (and so could hardly be wrong), that discredits their existence. There indeed is such an argument, and it indeed is not wrong on the straightforward sense of wrong. However, in how far it knocks down any conception of facts is another story, a story which is (...)
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  30. Chia-Ling Wang (2011). Power/Knowledge for Educational Theory: Stephen Ball and the Reception of Foucault. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):141-156.score: 12.0
    This paper explores the significance of the concept of power/knowledge in educational theory. The argument proceeds in two main parts. In the first, I consider aspects of Stephen J. Ball's highly influential work in educational theory. I examine his reception of Foucault's concept of power/knowledge and suggest that there are problems in his adoption of Foucault's thought. These problems arise from the way that he settles interpretations into received ideas. Foucault's thought, I try to show, is not to be (...)
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  31. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.score: 12.0
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia (...)
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  32. Laurence Goldstein (2009). Stephen Clark, the Laws of Logic and the Sorites. Philosophy 84 (1):135-143.score: 12.0
    A standard method for refuting a set of claims is to show that it implies a contradiction. Stephen Clark questions this method on the grounds that the Law of Non-Contradiction, together with the other fundamental laws of logic do not accord with everyday reality. He accounts for vagueness by suggesting that, for any vague predicate 'F', an ordinary object is typically to some extent both F and not-F, and that objects do not change abruptly from being F to being (...)
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  33. Dan Ryder, Critical Notice of Stephen Mumford's Dispositions.score: 12.0
    Stephen Mumford's Dispositions1 is an interesting and thought-provoking addition to a recent surge of publications on the topic.2 Dispositions have not been such a hot topic since the heyday of behaviourism. But as Mumford argues in his first chapter, the importance of dispositions to contemporary philosophy can hardly be underestimated. Dispositions are fundamental to causal role functionalism in the philosophy of mind, response-dependent truth conditional accounts of moral and other concepts,3 capacity accounts of concepts more generally,4 theories of belief, (...)
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  34. Peter Kivy (2003). Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.score: 12.0
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. (...)
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  35. Amitrajeet Batabyal (2012). Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):103-105.score: 12.0
    Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9298-7 Authors Amitrajeet A. Batabyal, Department of Economics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5604, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  36. Gerald J. Postema (2013). The Cautious, Jealous Virtue: Hume on Justice by Annette C. Baier. Hume Studies 37 (2):280-284.score: 12.0
    Annette Baier was the dean of contemporary Hume studies and one of the most insightful and influential philosophers writing on Hume. Since the late 1970s, her writings and the example of her distinctive mode of scholarship have inspired generations of scholars to look with fresh eyes at Hume's work. The special turn of her philosophical mind and personal style of writing are especially well-suited to uncover, appreciate, and effectively communicate the rich, nuanced, and humane dimensions of Hume's moral philosophy. (...)
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  37. Francisco J. Ayala, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory: On Stephen Jay Gould's Monumental Masterpiece.score: 12.0
    Stephen Jay Gould’s monumental The Structure of Evolutionary Theory ‘‘attempts to expand and alter the premises of Darwinism, in order to build an enlarged and distinctive evolutionary theory . . . while remaining within the tradition, and under the logic, of Darwinian argument.’’ The three branches or ‘‘fundamental principles of Darwinian logic’’ are, according to Gould: agency (natural selection acting on individual organisms), efficacy (producing new species adapted to their environments), and scope (accumulation of changes that through geological time (...)
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  38. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate's Response. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):53-60.score: 12.0
    I offer an interpretation of the connection between judging and intuiting in Kant (§2). Next I try to clarify how the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, as I read it, fits in the Phenomenology’s progression towards absolute knowing (§3). In some detailed responses to Stephen Houlgate, I reiterate how my reading is motivated by the wish not to discard, or ignore, Hegel’s first formulation of what is to be achieved by the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, and I object (...)
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  39. Robert Merrihew Adams (1993). Prospects for a Metaethical Argument for Theism: A Response to Stephen J. Sullivan. Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):313 - 318.score: 12.0
    Disagreements about the success of any given argument often arise because the suppositions of the critic differ from the suppositions of the author of the argument. In maintaining the plausibility of a metaethical argument for theism against the objections articulated by Stephen J. Sullivan, I will probe our differing suppositions with regard to the relation of theological to naturalistic metaethical theories, the starting point for the metaethical argument for theism, and the relation of the qualities of God's will to (...)
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  40. Louise Antony (1991). A Pieced Quilt: A Critical Discussion of Stephen Schiffer'sRemnants of Meaning. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):119-137.score: 12.0
    Abstract Stephen Schiffer, in his recent book, Remnants of Meaning, argues against the possibility of any compositional theory of meaning for natural language. Because the argument depends on the premise that there is no possible naturalistic reduction of the intentional to the physical, Schiffer's attack on theories of meaning is of central importance for theorists of mind. I respond to Schiffer's argument by showing that there is at least one reductive account of the mental that he has neglected to (...)
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  41. William Desmond (2005). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 36 (2):175-188.score: 12.0
    This is a response to issues raised by Stephen Houlgate in his article “Hegel, Desmond, and the Problem of God’s Transcendence,” dealing with Hegel’s God: A Counterfeit Double? The response focuses especially on the hermeneutical finesse we need in reading Hegel on religion, on the nature of “release” in Hegel, on the need for an agapeic God, and on the differences between Hegel’s speculative philosophy and Desmond’s metaxological approach to the practice of philosophy.
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  42. Lorenzo Greco (2010). Persons and Passions: Essays in Honor of Annette Baier (Review). Hume Studies 36 (2):229-232.score: 12.0
    Annette Baier stands out as a figure of prime importance on the contemporary philosophical horizon. This volume finally brings the proper recognition she deserves, presenting a rich collection of essays in her honor. Persons and Passions proves to be extremely interesting both for the discussion of Baier’s own philosophical reflection and as an example of how Baier represents an unparalleled source of inspiration for anyone concerned with the philosophers who have been at the forefront of her interests. (...)
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  43. Ethan Weed (2013). Stephen E. Palmer and Arthur P. Shimamura, Eds. Aesthetic Science. Estetika 50 (1):128-133.score: 12.0
    A review of Stephen E. Palmer´s and Arthur P. Shimamura´s (eds.) Aesthetic Science (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, xii + 408 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-973214-2).
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  44. Edward O. Wilson, Stephen J. Pope & Philip Hefner (2001). E. O. Wilson, Stephen Pope, and Philip Hefner: A Conversation. Zygon 36 (2):249-253.score: 12.0
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  45. Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.score: 12.0
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind (Jaak Panksepp) 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience (Rami Gabriel) 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self (Stephen Asma and Tom Greif) 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law (Glennon Curran and Rami Gabriel).
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  46. The Things We Mean & Stephen Schiffer (2005). The Things We Mean, by Stephen Schiffer. Disputatio.score: 12.0
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  47. Chris Renwick (2014). Response to Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):515-521.score: 12.0
    Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller’s commentaries on my paper “Completing Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at the London School of Economics during the 1930s” raises important questions about the historical entanglement of the political left, welfarism, biology, and social science. In this response, I clarify questions about my analysis of events at the London School of Economics in the early twentieth century and identify ways in which they are important in the present. I (...)
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  48. Nathan Andersen (2003). Is Film the Alien Other to Philosophy?, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 12.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
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  49. Julian Baggini (2003). Alien Ways of Thinking, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 12.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
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  50. Stephen L. Brock, Stephen L. Brock.score: 12.0
    Size is not always a gauge of significance. The issue that I propose to address here centers on a single clause from the Summa theologiae . But it goes nearly to the heart of St Thomas’s teaching on natural law. It concerns the way in which Thomas thinks the human mind comes to understand good and evil. The specific question raised by the clause is the role played in this process by what Thomas calls “natural inclination.” This question leads to (...)
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