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  1. Stephen Beckerman (2013). The Cultural Shaping of Revenge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):18-19.
    There are interesting parallelisms between McCullough et al.'s article and studies of revenge presented by French legal anthropologist Raymond Verdier, particularly as regards the discussion of the increasing likelihood of revenge with increasing social distance. Additionally, the observation that many peoples speak of revenge in the language of debt and repayment, links it with exchanges of benefits as well as costs.
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  2. Stephen Beckerman (2005). Sociosexual Strategies in Tribes and Nations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):277-278.
    Extending the findings of this work: Tribal peoples need study. Monogamy as marital institution and monogamy as sociosexual orientation must be separated. Sociosexuality must be considered as an aspect of somatic as well as reproductive effort; third-party interventions in sociosexuality need attention; and multiple sociosexual orientations, with frequency-dependent fitness payoffs equal at equilibrium, need to be modeled.
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  3. Stephen Beckerman (2000). Mating and Marriage, Husbands and Lovers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):590-591.
    Human mating strategies are contingent on individual prospects. Gangestad & Simpson provide a useful framework to explore these differing prospects, but do not take sufficient account of what is known ethnographically about mating decisions. Women often do not select their own long term mates. Men often have two or more long term mates, and can invest in the offspring of short term matings also.
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  4. Stephen Beckerman (1999). Violence, Sex, and the Good Mother. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):215-216.
    Campbell's evolutionary explanation of women's typically lower rates of interpersonal aggression is plausible, but some supporting evidence requires scrutiny. Women may not commit less interpersonal violence than men against small children. Women are more vulnerable than men in same-sex encounters. The link between dominance and reproductive success for males is less secure than was once thought.
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  5. Stephen Beckerman (1991). The Cross Cultural Method and the Incest Taboo. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):263-264.
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