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  1. Stephen D. Dumont (2005). Duns Scotus's Parisian Question on the Formal Distinction. Vivarium 43 (1):7-62.
    The degree of realism that Duns Scotus understood his formal distinction to have implied is a matter of dispute going back to the fourteenth century. Both modern and medieval commentators alike have seen Scotus's later, Parisian treament of the formal distinction as less realist in the sense that it would deny any extra-mentally separate formalities or realities. This less realist reading depends in large part on a question known to scholars only in the highly corrupt edition of Luke Wadding, where (...)
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  2. Stephen D. Dumont (2003). Review of Thomas Williams (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (7).
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  3. Stephen D. Dumont (1995). The Origin of Scotus's Theory of Synchronic Contingency. Modern Schoolman 72 (2-3):149-167.
  4. Stephen D. Dumont (1992). Transcendental Being: Scotus and Scotists. Topoi 11 (2):135-148.
    Of singular importance to the medieval theory of transcendentals was the position of John Duns Scotus that there could be a concept of being univocally common, not only to substance and accidents, but even to God and creatures. Scotus''s doctrine of univocal transcendental concepts violated the accepted view that, owing to its generality, no transcendental notion could be univocal. The major difficulty facing Scotus''s doctrine of univocity was to explain how a real, as opposed to a purely logical, concept could (...)
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  5. Stephen D. Dumont (1992). The Propositio Famosa Scoti: Duns Scotus and Ockham on the Possibility of a Science of Theology. Dialogue 31 (03):415-.
  6. Stephen F. Brown & Stephen D. Dumont (1989). Univocity of the Concept of Being in the Fourteenth Century III: An Early Scotist. Mediaeval Studies 51 (1):1-129.
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  7. Stephen D. Dumont (1989). Theology as a Science and Duns Scotus's Distinction Between Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition. Speculum 64 (3):579-599.
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  8. Stephen D. Dumont (1988). The Univocity of the Concept of Being in the Fourteenth Century: II. The De Ente of Peter Thomae. Mediaeval Studies 50 (1):186-256.
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  9. Stephen D. Dumont (1987). The Univocity of the Concept of Being in the Fourteenth Century: John Duns Scotus and William of Alnwick. Mediaeval Studies 49 (1):1-75.
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