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  1.  24 DLs
    Robert Ackermann, Brian Baigrie, Harold I. Brown, Michael Cavanaugh, Paul Fox-Strangways, Gonzalo Munevar, Stephen David Ross, Philip Pettit, Paul Roth, Frederick Schmitt, Stephen Turner & Charles Wallis (1988). Responses to 'in Defense of Relativism'. Social Epistemology 2 (3):227 – 261.
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  2.  24 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1981). The Sovereignty and Utility of the Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):145-154.
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  3.  22 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Abundance. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:357-468.
    Quantum aesthetics fosters what might be called a general thesis of metaphysical intimacy. There is no place left, even in nature, where uninterpreted events can hide. With regard to the work of Niels Bohr and Heisenberg, this condition of unavoidable interpretation is referred to as the “indivisibility of the quantum action.” Accordingly, talking about any privileged or pristine considerations involves contradictions that, according to advocates of quantum aesthetics, must be overcome. Now, every facet of existence has a voice that has (...)
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  4.  21 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1994). The Limits of Language. Fordham University Press.
    The Limits of Language concerns itself with the nature and limits of language at a time when our understanding of the world and of ourselves is intimately related to what we understand of language.
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  5.  15 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Knowledge. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:23-46.
    When one is asked "What is the most important moral principle in ancient philosophy?" the immediate answer is not "Take care of oneself" but the Delphic principle gnōthi sauton ("Know thyself"). (Foucault, TS, 19)I can't as yet "know myself," as the inscription at Delphi enjoins, and so long as that ignorance remains it seems to me ridiculous to inquire into extraneous matters. (Plato, Phaedrus, 230a)I certainly do not yet know myself, but whithersoever the wind, as it were, of the argument (...)
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  6.  15 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Bibliography. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:513-565.
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  7.  14 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Re-Membering. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:43-59.
    Memory is, therefore, neither perception nor conception, but a state or affection of one of these, conditioned by lapse of time. As already observed, there is no such thing as memory of the present while present; for the present is object only of perception, and the future, of expectation, but the object of memory is the past. All memory, therefore, implies a time elapsed; consequently only those animals which perceive time remember, and the organ whereby they perceive time is also (...)
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  8.  13 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Love. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:129-152.
    The ownership condemned with such rigor by the mystics, and often called impurity, is only the search for one's own solace and one's own interest in the jouissance of the gifts of God, at the expense of the jealousy of the pure love that wants everything for God and nothing for the creature .... Ownership, of course, is nothing but self-love or pride, which is the love of one's own excellence insofar as it is one's own, and which, instead of (...)
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  9.  12 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Past and Future. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:177-218.
    By submitting to the primacy of the question “What?” the phenomenology of memory finds itself at the outset confronting a formidable aporia present in ordinary language: the presence in which the representation of the past seems to consist does indeed appear to be that of an image. We say interchangeably that we represent a past event to ourselves or that we have an image of it, an image that can be either quasi visual or auditory. . . . Memory, reduced (...)
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  10.  12 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Pain. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:303-333.
    Physical pain has no voice, but when it at last finds a voice, it begins to tell a story, and the story that it tells is about the inseparability of these three subjects, their embeddedness in one another. (Scarry, BP, 3).
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  11.  11 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Identity. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:75-95.
    Possession is preeminently the form in which the other becomes the same, by becoming mine. (Levinas, TI, 46)If perceptions are distinct existences, they form a whole only by being connected together. But no connexions among distinct existences are ever discoverable by human understanding. We only feel a connexion or determination of the thought to pass from one object to another. It follows, therefore, that the thought alone feels personal identity, when reflecting on the train of past perceptions that compose a (...)
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  12.  11 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self and WorId. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:193-205.
    Man, in the analytic of finitude, is a strange empirico-transcendental doublet, since he is a being such that knowledge will be attained in him of what renders all knowledge possible. (Foucault, OT, 318)Man is a mode of being which accommodates that dimension-always open, never finally delimited, yet constantly traversed-which extends from a part of himself not reflected in a cogito to the act of thought by which he apprehends that part; and which, in the inverse direction, extends from that pure (...)
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  13.  10 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Notes. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:505-511.
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  14.  10 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1983). The Epochal Nature of Process in Whitehead's Metaphysics. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (3):118-120.
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  15.  10 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Care. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:47-73.
    I wish to take up the subject ... in relation to a set of practices in late antiquity. Among the Greeks, these practices took the form of a precept: epimeleisthai sautou, "to take care of yourself," to take "care of the self," "to be concerned, to take care of yourself."The precept of the "care of the self" [souci de soi] was, for the Greeks, one of the main principles of cities, one of the main rules for social and personal conduct (...)
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  16.  10 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Betrayal. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:293-308.
    At the centre of the principle, always, the One does violence to itself, and guards itself against the other. (Derrida, PF, ix)The One betrays itself in betraying the other.The self double crosses itself in double crossing the others.
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  17.  10 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Image. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:97-127.
    The image, at first sight, does not resemble the cadaver, but it is possible that the rotting, decaying, cadaverous strangeness might also be from the image. (Blanchot, EL, 344; [my translation])But what is the image? When there is nothing, the image finds in this nothing its necessary condition, but there it disappears. The image needs the neutrality and the fading of the world: it wants everything to return to the indifferent deep where nothing is affirmed; it tends toward the intimacy (...)
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  18.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Body and Image. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:159-176.
    The phenomenology of memory proposed here is structured around two questions: Of what are there memories? Whose memory is it? (Ricoeur, MHF, 3)in the margins of a critique of imagination, there has to be an uncoupling of imagination from memory . . . . (5–6).
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  19.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Counter-Memory. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:139-158.
    there is something else to which we are witness, and which we might describe as an insurrection of subjugated knowledges. (Foucault, 2L, 81)a whole set of knowledges that have been disqualified as inadequate to their task or insufficiently elaborated: naive knowledges, . . . . (82)What emerges out of this is something one might call a genealogy, or rather a multiplicity of genealogical researches, a painstaking rediscovery of struggles together with the rude memory of their conflicts. (83)Let us give the (...)
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  20.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Body Images. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:55-106.
    Now let us imagine, if you please, a tiny worm living in the blood, . . . . The worm would be living in the blood as we are living in our part of the universe, and it would regard each individual particle as a whole, not a part, and it would have no idea as to how all the parts are controlled by the overall nature of the blood and compelled to mutual adaptation as the overall nature of the (...)
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  21.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Disaster. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:335-350.
    The disaster ruins everything, all the while leaving everything intact. It does not touch anyone in particular; “I” am not threatened by it, but spared, left aside. It is in this way that I am threatened;. . . .The disaster is separate; that which is most separate.When the disaster comes upon us, it does not come. The disaster is its imminence, but since the future, as we conceive of it in the order of lived time, belongs to the disaster, the (...)
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  22.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1989). Inexhaustibility and Human Being: An Essay on Locality. Fordham University Press.
    LOCALITY AND JUDGMENT THE GENERAL THEMES OF THE VIEW OF PRACTICE I will develop here are expressed in the triangle of locality, inexhaustibility, ...
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  23.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Empty Self. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:233-268.
    Zen-Buddhist nothingness is the nowhere is there something that is I, or conversely: the I that is the nowhere is there something. (Hisamatsu, FN, 25-26; quoted and trans. in Stambaugh, FS, 76)... it is empty of being. That means that it is beyond all measure ....... it is empty without emptiness. That means that it does not cling to itself.... it possesses nothing. That means that it doesn't possess and also cannot be possessed. (Hisamatsu, FN, 31; quoted and trans. in (...)
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  24.  9 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Inheritance. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:277-301.
    How does one desire forgetting? How does one desire not to keep?How does one desire mourning (assuming that to mourn, to work at mourning does not amount to keeping . . .)? (Derrida, GT, 36)Jacques Derrida died Friday night, October 8–9, 2004.
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  25.  8 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Responsive Self. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:269-292.
    The word I means here I am, answering for everything and for everyone. (Levinas, S, 104)Responsibility carries within it, and must do so, an essential excessiveness. It regulates itself neither on the principle of reason nor on any sort of accountancy. (Derrida, EW, 272)differance, trace, iterability, ex-appropriation, and so on ... are at work everywhere, which is to say, well beyond humanity. (p. 274).
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  26.  8 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1973). The Inexhaustibility of Nature. Journal of Value Inquiry 7 (4):241-253.
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  27.  8 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Introduction. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:1-20.
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  28.  8 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). World as Art. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:107-142.
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  29.  7 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). General Preface to the Project. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:1-5.
    Sixth volume devoted to the good. Human, natural worlds filled with gifts. Nature, general economy of the good, earth's abundance, beyond measure. Gifts and giving, beyond having. Cherishment, sacrifice, plenishment: exposure to the good. Plato. The good grants authority to knowledge and truth. Anaximander. Injustice, restitution.Beauty, truth, justice gifts from the good. Precedence in Western philosophic tradition to gathering, assembling, and having being. Love of self as having. A self beyond itself, giving beyond having. Ethic responsive to the heterogeneous abundance (...)
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  30.  7 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). World as Phenomenon. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:3-22.
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  31.  7 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Re-Calling. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:21-41.
    [T]here is that theory which you have often described to us—that what we call learning is really just recollection (anamnēsis). If that is true, then surely what we recollect now we must have learned at some time before, which is impossible unless our souls existed somewhere before they entered this human shape. So in that way too it seems likely that the soul is immortal. (Plato, Phaedo, 72e–73a)Thus the soul, since it is immortal and has been born many times, and (...)
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  32.  6 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). World of Masks. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:143-196.
    The word person is Latin: . . . which signifies the face, as persona in Latin signifies the disguise, or outward appearance of a man, counterfeited on the stage; and sometimes more particularly that part of it, which disguiseth the face, as a mask or vizard:. . . . So that a person, is the same that an actor is, both on the stage and in common conversation; and to personate, is to act, or represent himself, or another;. . . (...)
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  33.  6 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Calling. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:197-247.
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  34.  6 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1986). The Aesthetic Point of View. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):59-59.
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  35.  6 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1980). Studies in Process Philosophy I and II. International Studies in Philosophy 12 (2):121-122.
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  36.  6 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1983). Rorty on Pragmatism. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (3):61-64.
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  37.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1988). Inexhaustibility in Heidegger's Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):73-88.
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  38.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Everyday Life. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:219-245.
    [T]he common character of the mildest, as well as the severest cases, to which the faulty and chance actions contribute, lies in the ability to refer the phenomena to unwelcome, repressed, psychic material, which, though pushed away from consciousness, is nevertheless not robbed of all capacity to express itself. (Freud, PEL, 146).
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  39.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self and Other. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:153-172.
    To take up only the most beautiful, as yet to be made manifest in the realm of time and space, there are angels. These messengers who never remain enclosed in a place, who are also never immobile .... Endlessly reopening the enclosure of the universe, of universes, identities, the unfolding of actions, of history.The angel is that which unceasingly passes through the envelope(s) or container(s), goes from one side to the other, reworking every deadline, changing every decision, thwarting all repetition (...)
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  40.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Counter-History. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:129-138.
    The fundamental faith of the metaphysicians is the faith in opposite values. . . .For one may doubt, first, whether there are any opposites at all, and secondly whether these popular valuations and opposite values on which the metaphysicians put their seal, are not perhaps merely foreground estimates, only provisional perspectives, perhaps even from some nook, perhaps from below, frog perspectives, as it were, to borrow an expression painters use. For all the value that the true, the truthful, the selfless (...)
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  41.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2009). Wonder. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:269-356.
    wonder is the feeling of a philosopher, and philosophy begins in wonder. He was not a bad genealogist who said that Iris [the messenger of heaven] is the child of Thaumas [wonder].1 (Plato,Theaetetus, 155d)When our first encounter with some object surprises us and we find it novel, or very different from what we formerly knew or from what we supposed it ought to be, this causes us to wonder and to be astonished at it. . . . I regard wonder (...)
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  42.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1982). The Philosophy of Teaching. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):115-116.
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  43.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Self with Others. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:173-191.
    Dasein is authentically itself only to the extent that, as concernful Being-alongside and solicitous Being-with, it projects itself upon its ownmost potentiality-for-Being rather than upon the possibility of the they-self. (Heidegger, BT, 308)The more I return to myself, the more I divest myself, under the traumatic effect of persecution, of my freedom as a constituted, willful, imperialist subject, the more I discover myself to be responsible; the more just I am, the more guilty I am. I am "in myself" through (...)
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  44.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1982). Axiology: The Science of Values; Ethics: The Science of Oughtness. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):88-89.
  45.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Shattered Self. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:207-231.
    the face summons me, calls for me, begs for me, ... calls me into question. (Levinas, EFP, 83)we are difference, ... our selves the difference of masks. (Foucault, AK, 130-1)There are no parts, moments, types, or stages of love. There is only an infinity of shatters. (Nancy, SL, 101)Only the body fulfills the concept of the words "exposition," "being exposed." And since the body is not a concept ... there is no "body." (Nancy, BP, 205)Sense is the singularity of all (...)
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  46.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1991). The Unthought is Our 'Geschlecht'. Social Epistemology 5 (4):327 – 333.
  47.  5 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (ed.) (1994). Art and its Significance: An Anthology of Aesthetic Theory, Third Edition. State University of New York Press.
    This anthology has been significantly expanded for this edition to include a wider range of contemporary issues.
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  48.  4 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1977). Some Ambiguities in Identifying the Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (2):137-145.
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  49.  4 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (1980). The Work of Art and its General Relations. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (4):427-434.
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  50.  4 DLs
    Stephen David Ross (2010). Diachrony. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:247-276.
    A giving which gives only its gift, but in the giving holds itself back and withdraws, . . . . (Heidegger, TB, 8)the Forgotten is . . . the Law. (Lyotard, “HJ," 147)how could this thought (Heidegger’s), a thought so devoted to remembering that a forgetting (of Being) takes place in all thought, in all art, in all “representation” of the world, how could it possibly have ignored the thought of [that] which, in a certain sense, thinks, tries to think, (...)
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