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  1. Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.) (2010). The Making of Human Concepts. OUP Oxford.
    Human adults appear different from other animals in their ability to form abstract mental representations that go beyond perceptual similarity. In short, they can conceptualize the world. This apparent uniqueness leads to an immediate puzzle: WHEN and HOW does this abstract system come into being? To answer this question we need to explore the origins of adult concepts, both developmentally and phylogenetically; When does the developing child acquire the ability to use abstract concepts? Does the transition occur around 2 years, (...)
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  2. Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Drug: The Biological Psychology of a Strong Incentive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order to obtain (...)
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  3. Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money: Motivation, Metaphors, and Mores. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):196-204.
    Our response amplifies our case that money is best seen as both a drug and a tool. Some commentators challenge our core assumptions: In this response we, therefore, explain in more detail why we assume that money is an exceptionally strong motivator, and that a biological explanation of money motivation is required. We also provide evidence to support those assumptions. Other commentators criticise our use of the drug metaphor, particularly arguing that it is empirically empty; and in our response we (...)
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  4. Stephen E. G. Lea (1991). Why Optimality is Not Worth Arguing About. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):225.
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  5. Stephen E. G. Lea & Roger M. Tarpy (1990). Extending the Evolutionary and Economic Analysis of Intertemporal Choice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):419-420.
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  6. Stephen E. G. Lea & Marie Midgley (1988). Learning as a Constraint on Obligatory Responding. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):459.
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