Search results for 'Stephen Galoob' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Stephen Galoob (forthcoming). Stephen Winter, Transitional Justice in Established Democracies: A Political Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.score: 600.0
    The fundamental question of political reparation is: why should a state provide redress for an injustice? The predominant answer justifies redress in terms of debts—the perpetration of an injustice creates a debt, and a state is required to make redress for the same reasons that it is required to repay its debts . Other approaches justify redress on the grounds that it will facilitate the achievement of some broader political goal, like the fair distribution of social resources or political reconciliation.In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen Galoob (2012). How Do Roles Generate Reasons? A Method of Legal Ethics. Legal Ethics 15 (1):1-28.score: 240.0
    Philosophical discussions of legal ethics should be oriented around the generative problem , which asks two fundamental questions. First, how does the lawyer's role generate reasons? Second, what kinds of reasons can this role generate? Every extant theory of legal ethics is based on a solution to the generative problem. On the generative method , theories of legal ethics are evaluated based on the plausibility of these solutions. I apply this method to three prominent theories of legal ethics, finding that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Stephen R. Galoob & Leib (2014). Intentions, Compliance, and Fiduciary Obligations. Legal Theory 20 (2):106-132.score: 240.0
    This essay investigates the structure of fiduciary obligations, specifically the obligation of loyalty. Fiduciary obligations differ from promissory obligations with respect to the possibility of Promissory obligations can be satisfied through behavior that conforms to a promise, even if that behavior is done for inappropriate reasons. By contrast, fiduciary loyalty necessarily has an intentional dimension, one that prevents satisfaction through accidental compliance. The intentional dimension of fiduciary loyalty is best described by what we call the account. This account both explains (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Daan Evers (2013). Weight for Stephen Finlay. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.score: 24.0
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Stephen Jay Gould. In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.score: 24.0
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Katrina L. Sifferd (forthcoming). What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 24.0
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Calum Miller (forthcoming). Response to Stephen Law on the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism. Philosophia:1-6.score: 24.0
    Alvin Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism argues that the probability of our possessing reliable cognitive faculties, given the truth of evolution and naturalism, is low, and that this provides a defeater for naturalism, if the naturalist in question holds to the general truths of evolutionary biology. Stephen Law has recently objected to Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism by suggesting that there exist conceptual constraints governing the content a belief can have given its relationships to other things, including behaviour (CC). (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stephen Makin (2000). Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.score: 21.0
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Aaron Allen Schiller (2009). Colorblindness and Black Friends in Stephen Colbert’s America. In , Stephen Colbert and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 21.0
    Is there a contradiction in Stephen Colbert’s attitudes towards race? How can he consistently claim to be colorblind and yet hold a national search for a new "black friend"? I argue that Stephen is trying to claim rights and shirk responsibilities on matters of race relations in America, and that his famous notion of "truthiness" is an extension of this attitude to other areas of social and political discourse.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) (2011). Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown. Brill.score: 21.0
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Graham Oppy (1995). Professor William Craig's Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.score: 18.0
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):27-38.score: 18.0
    I argue that Stephen Houlgate misstates an element in the Kantian background to my reading of “Lordship and Bondage” (§2). He misreads my remarks about the need to see Hegel’s moves there in the context of the progression towards absolute knowing (§3), and, partly consequently, he fails to engage with the motivation for my reading (§4). And he does not understand the way my reading exploits the concept of allegory (§5).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jonardon Ganeri (2010). The Study of Indian Epistemology: Questions of Method—a Reply to Matthew Dasti and Stephen H. Phillips. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):541-550.score: 18.0
    I would like to thank the editors of Philosophy East and West for courteously asking me if I would like to respond to Matthew Dasti and Stephen Phillips' very thoughtful remarks about the review I wrote of Phillips' translation and commentary on the pratyakṣa chapter of Gaṅgeśa's Tattvacintāmaṇi, prepared in collaboration with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya (Phillips and Tatacharya 2004). Let me begin by reaffirming what I said at the beginning of my review, that the book is "a monumental (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen Darwall (2009). The Second-Person Standpoint An Interview with Stephen Darwall. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):118-138.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Justin Tiwald (2011). Stephen C. Angle: Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):231-235.score: 18.0
    Review of Stephen C. Angle's Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. A. Max Jarvie (2007). Unwrinkling the Carpet of Meaning: Stephen Schiffer, the Things We Mean. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):85-99.score: 18.0
    This article is a critical review of Stephen Schiffer’s monograph The Things We Mean . The text discusses some novel contributions made by Schiffer to the philosophy of meaning, in particular, Schiffer’s proposal for the reification of certain abstract entities and the application of his argument to the philosophical problem of vagueness in natural language. Special attention is paid both to Schiffer’s ingenious use of the notion of conservative extension , here employed as a criterion for distinguishing legitimate from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter Pagin (2005). Review of Stephen Schiffer, The Things We Mean. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).score: 18.0
    After Meaning, 1972, and The Remnants of Meaning , 1987, The Things We Mean is Stephen Schiffer's third major work on the foundations of the theory of linguistic meaning. In simplest possible outline, the development started with a positive attempt to base a meaning theory on a modified Gricean account of utterance meaning, but took a negative turn, with the problems of belief sentences as a major reason for thinking that a systematic (compositional) semantic theory for natural language was (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. William Dembski, An Analysis of Homer Simpson and Stephen Jay Gould.score: 18.0
    Note: The Simpson's, television's popular prime-time cartoon known for its satirical commentary on various social issues, recently took a shot at the creation-evolution debate by featuring Stephen Jay Gould prominently in one of its episodes. Here is Bill Dembski's review and observations of that episode.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Chia-Ling Wang (2011). Power/Knowledge for Educational Theory: Stephen Ball and the Reception of Foucault. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):141-156.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the significance of the concept of power/knowledge in educational theory. The argument proceeds in two main parts. In the first, I consider aspects of Stephen J. Ball's highly influential work in educational theory. I examine his reception of Foucault's concept of power/knowledge and suggest that there are problems in his adoption of Foucault's thought. These problems arise from the way that he settles interpretations into received ideas. Foucault's thought, I try to show, is not to be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.score: 18.0
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jaroslav Peregrin, Stephen Neale, Facing Facts, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001, Xv + 254 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    It is now often taken for granted that facts are entia non grata, for there exists a powerful argument (dubbed the slingshot), which is backed by such great names as Frege or Gödel or Davidson (and so could hardly be wrong), that discredits their existence. There indeed is such an argument, and it indeed is not wrong on the straightforward sense of wrong. However, in how far it knocks down any conception of facts is another story, a story which is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Dan Ryder, Critical Notice of Stephen Mumford's Dispositions.score: 18.0
    Stephen Mumford's Dispositions1 is an interesting and thought-provoking addition to a recent surge of publications on the topic.2 Dispositions have not been such a hot topic since the heyday of behaviourism. But as Mumford argues in his first chapter, the importance of dispositions to contemporary philosophy can hardly be underestimated. Dispositions are fundamental to causal role functionalism in the philosophy of mind, response-dependent truth conditional accounts of moral and other concepts,3 capacity accounts of concepts more generally,4 theories of belief, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Laurence Goldstein (2009). Stephen Clark, the Laws of Logic and the Sorites. Philosophy 84 (1):135-143.score: 18.0
    A standard method for refuting a set of claims is to show that it implies a contradiction. Stephen Clark questions this method on the grounds that the Law of Non-Contradiction, together with the other fundamental laws of logic do not accord with everyday reality. He accounts for vagueness by suggesting that, for any vague predicate 'F', an ordinary object is typically to some extent both F and not-F, and that objects do not change abruptly from being F to being (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter Kivy (2003). Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.score: 18.0
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Amitrajeet Batabyal (2012). Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):103-105.score: 18.0
    Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9298-7 Authors Amitrajeet A. Batabyal, Department of Economics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5604, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert Merrihew Adams (1993). Prospects for a Metaethical Argument for Theism: A Response to Stephen J. Sullivan. Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):313 - 318.score: 18.0
    Disagreements about the success of any given argument often arise because the suppositions of the critic differ from the suppositions of the author of the argument. In maintaining the plausibility of a metaethical argument for theism against the objections articulated by Stephen J. Sullivan, I will probe our differing suppositions with regard to the relation of theological to naturalistic metaethical theories, the starting point for the metaethical argument for theism, and the relation of the qualities of God's will to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Louise Antony (1991). A Pieced Quilt: A Critical Discussion of Stephen Schiffer'sRemnants of Meaning. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):119-137.score: 18.0
    Abstract Stephen Schiffer, in his recent book, Remnants of Meaning, argues against the possibility of any compositional theory of meaning for natural language. Because the argument depends on the premise that there is no possible naturalistic reduction of the intentional to the physical, Schiffer's attack on theories of meaning is of central importance for theorists of mind. I respond to Schiffer's argument by showing that there is at least one reductive account of the mental that he has neglected to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Francisco J. Ayala, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory: On Stephen Jay Gould's Monumental Masterpiece.score: 18.0
    Stephen Jay Gould’s monumental The Structure of Evolutionary Theory ‘‘attempts to expand and alter the premises of Darwinism, in order to build an enlarged and distinctive evolutionary theory . . . while remaining within the tradition, and under the logic, of Darwinian argument.’’ The three branches or ‘‘fundamental principles of Darwinian logic’’ are, according to Gould: agency (natural selection acting on individual organisms), efficacy (producing new species adapted to their environments), and scope (accumulation of changes that through geological time (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate's Response. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):53-60.score: 18.0
    I offer an interpretation of the connection between judging and intuiting in Kant (§2). Next I try to clarify how the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, as I read it, fits in the Phenomenology’s progression towards absolute knowing (§3). In some detailed responses to Stephen Houlgate, I reiterate how my reading is motivated by the wish not to discard, or ignore, Hegel’s first formulation of what is to be achieved by the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, and I object (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. William Desmond (2005). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 36 (2):175-188.score: 18.0
    This is a response to issues raised by Stephen Houlgate in his article “Hegel, Desmond, and the Problem of God’s Transcendence,” dealing with Hegel’s God: A Counterfeit Double? The response focuses especially on the hermeneutical finesse we need in reading Hegel on religion, on the nature of “release” in Hegel, on the need for an agapeic God, and on the differences between Hegel’s speculative philosophy and Desmond’s metaxological approach to the practice of philosophy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ethan Weed (2013). Stephen E. Palmer and Arthur P. Shimamura, Eds. Aesthetic Science. Estetika 50 (1):128-133.score: 18.0
    A review of Stephen E. Palmer´s and Arthur P. Shimamura´s (eds.) Aesthetic Science (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, xii + 408 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-973214-2).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Edward O. Wilson, Stephen J. Pope & Philip Hefner (2001). E. O. Wilson, Stephen Pope, and Philip Hefner: A Conversation. Zygon 36 (2):249-253.score: 18.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Stephen L. Brock, Stephen L. Brock.score: 18.0
    Size is not always a gauge of significance. The issue that I propose to address here centers on a single clause from the Summa theologiae . But it goes nearly to the heart of St Thomas’s teaching on natural law. It concerns the way in which Thomas thinks the human mind comes to understand good and evil. The specific question raised by the clause is the role played in this process by what Thomas calls “natural inclination.” This question leads to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Graham Harman (2012). Concerning Stephen Hawking's Claim That Philosophy is Dead. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):11-22.score: 18.0
    The article begins from Stephen Hawking's well-known claim that philosophy is dead, and considers several other quotations in which philosophy is either belittled or subordinated outright to the natural sciences. This subordination requires a downward reductionism that is paralleled by the upward reductionism of the linguistic turn and social constructionist theories. Rather than undermining or overmining mid-sized individual entities, philosophy must deal with objects on their own terms. This suggests a possible tactical alliance between philosophy and the arts.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Charles Pigden (2010). Substance, Content, Taxonomy and Consequence: A Comment on Stephen Maitzen. In , Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave Macmillan. 313-319.score: 18.0
    This is a response to Stephen Maitzen’s paper. ‘Moral Conclusions from Nonmoral Premises’. Maitzen thinks that No-Ought-From-Is is false. He does not dispute the formal proofs of Schurz and myself, but he thinks they are beside the point. For what the proponents of No-Ought-From-Is need to show is not that you cannot get SUBSTANTIVELY moral conclusions from FORMALLY non-moral premises but that you cannot get SUBSTANTIVELY moral conclusions from SUBSTANTIVELY non-moral premises. And he believes that he can derive substantively (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Nathan Andersen (2003). Is Film the Alien Other to Philosophy?, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 18.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Julian Baggini (2003). Alien Ways of Thinking, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 18.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. The Things We Mean & Stephen Schiffer (2005). The Things We Mean, by Stephen Schiffer. Disputatio.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Chris Renwick (2014). Response to Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):515-521.score: 18.0
    Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller’s commentaries on my paper “Completing Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at the London School of Economics during the 1930s” raises important questions about the historical entanglement of the political left, welfarism, biology, and social science. In this response, I clarify questions about my analysis of events at the London School of Economics in the early twentieth century and identify ways in which they are important in the present. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Michael S. Moore (forthcoming). Stephen Morse on the Fundamental Psycho-Legal Error. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-45.score: 18.0
    Stephen Morse has long proclaimed there to be a “fundamental psycho-legal error” (FPLE) that is regularly made by legal and social/psychological/medical science academics alike. This is the error of thinking that causation of human choice by factors themselves outside the chooser’s control excuses that chooser from moral responsibility. In this paper, I examine Morse’s self-labelled “internalist” defense of his thesis that this is indeed an error, and finds such internalist defense incomplete; needed is the kind of externalist defense of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Stephen Bocking (1990). Stephen Forbes, Jacob Reighard, and the Emergence of Aquatic Ecology in the Great Lakes Region. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (3):461 - 498.score: 18.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stephen Maitzen (2000). C. Stephen Evans, Faith Beyond Reason: A Kierkegaardian Account Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (2):98-99.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John F. McDiarmid (2012). Recovering Republican Eloquence: John Cheke Versus Stephen Gardiner on the Pronunciation of Greek. History of European Ideas 38 (3):338-351.score: 18.0
    The controversy over Greek pronunciation at Cambridge University in 1542, principally between university chancellor Stephen Gardiner and regius professor of Greek John Cheke, marked the emergence of not only the linguistic but also the political agenda of the mid-Tudor Cambridge humanists. This important group included future statesmen and political thinkers such as William Cecil, later Elizabeth's famous minister, Thomas Smith, author of De republica anglorum, and John Ponet, leading exponent of ?resistance theory?. In the 1542 Greek controversy Cheke and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Callum D. Scott (2012). The Death of Philosophy: A Response to Stephen Hawking. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):385-404.score: 18.0
    In his 2010 work, The Grand Design, Stephen Hawking, argues that ‘… philosophy is dead’ (2010: 5). While not a Philosopher, Hawking provides strong argument for his thesis, principally that philosophers have not taken science sufficiently seriously and so Philosophy is no longer relevant to knowledge claims. In this paper, Hawking’s claim is appraised and critiqued, becoming a meta-philosophical discussion. It is argued that Philosophy is dead, in some sense, due to particular philosophers having embarked on an intellectual path (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. H. S., E. R. Dodds & Stephen MacKenna (1937). Journal and Letters of Stephen MacKenna. Journal of Hellenic Studies 57:83.score: 18.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Stephen Hawking (2005). Conferencia del Profesor Stephen Hawking en la ceremonia de apertura del 25 Aniversario de los Premios Príncipe de Asturias. Polis 11.score: 18.0
    Tras señalar que la Segunda Ley de la Termodinámica se cumple porque el universo empezó en un estado ordenado, y que para predecir el estado inicial se deben ocupar tanto la relatividad general como la teoría cuántica, Hawking propone que el universo no tiene una sola historia sino todas las historias posibles, cada una con su propia amplitud de probabilidad. Postula que las historias del universo dependen de lo que está siendo medido, al revés de la idea habitual de que (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stephen C. Hedman (1980). Basic Biology Texts Biology Karen Arms Pamela S. Camp Biology William A. Jensen Bernd Heinrich David B. Wake Marvalee H. Wake Stephen L. Wolfe. [REVIEW] BioScience 30 (1):42-43.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eleanor Kaufman (2001). Deleuze, Klossowski, Cinema, Immobility: A Response to Stephen Arnott. Film-Philosophy 5 (2).score: 18.0
    Stephen Arnott 'Deleuze's Idea of Cinema' _Film-Philosophy_, Deleuze Special Issue vol. 5 no. 32, November 2001.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen Laurence (2005). Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence, & Stephen Stich. In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 1--3.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000