Search results for 'Stephen Hawking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Hawking (2005). Conferencia del Profesor Stephen Hawking en la ceremonia de apertura del 25 Aniversario de los Premios Príncipe de Asturias. Polis 11.score: 600.0
    Tras señalar que la Segunda Ley de la Termodinámica se cumple porque el universo empezó en un estado ordenado, y que para predecir el estado inicial se deben ocupar tanto la relatividad general como la teoría cuántica, Hawking propone que el universo no tiene una sola historia sino todas las historias posibles, cada una con su propia amplitud de probabilidad. Postula que las historias del universo dependen de lo que está siendo medido, al revés de la idea habitual de (...)
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  2. Stephen Hawking & Roger Penrose (1996). The Nature of Space and Time. Princeton University Press.score: 120.0
    Why does time go forward, not backward?In this book, the two opponents touch on all these questions.
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  3. Stephen W. Hawking (forthcoming). Cohen and Set Theory. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic.score: 120.0
     
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  4. Stephen W. Hawking & Carsten Klein (1995). Einsteins Traum (ubersetzt von Hainer Kober). Journal for General Philosophy of Science 26 (2):354-364.score: 120.0
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  5. Graham Oppy (1995). Professor William Craig's Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.score: 60.0
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of (...)
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  6. Amitrajeet Batabyal (2012). Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):103-105.score: 60.0
    Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9298-7 Authors Amitrajeet A. Batabyal, Department of Economics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5604, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  7. Graham Harman (2012). Concerning Stephen Hawking's Claim That Philosophy is Dead. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):11-22.score: 60.0
    The article begins from Stephen Hawking's well-known claim that philosophy is dead, and considers several other quotations in which philosophy is either belittled or subordinated outright to the natural sciences. This subordination requires a downward reductionism that is paralleled by the upward reductionism of the linguistic turn and social constructionist theories. Rather than undermining or overmining mid-sized individual entities, philosophy must deal with objects on their own terms. This suggests a possible tactical alliance between philosophy and the arts.
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  8. Callum D. Scott (2012). The Death of Philosophy: A Response to Stephen Hawking. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):385-404.score: 60.0
    In his 2010 work, The Grand Design, Stephen Hawking, argues that ‘… philosophy is dead’ (2010: 5). While not a Philosopher, Hawking provides strong argument for his thesis, principally that philosophers have not taken science sufficiently seriously and so Philosophy is no longer relevant to knowledge claims. In this paper, Hawking’s claim is appraised and critiqued, becoming a meta-philosophical discussion. It is argued that Philosophy is dead, in some sense, due to particular philosophers having embarked on (...)
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  9. Joseph M. Zycinski (1996). Metaphysics and Epistemology in Stephen Hawking's Theory of the Creation of the Universe. Zygon 31 (2):269-284.score: 45.0
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  10. Varadaraja V. Raman (2011). The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow. Zygon 46 (1):246-247.score: 45.0
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  11. Quentin Smith (1998). Why Stephen Hawking's Cosmology Precludes a Creator. Philo 1 (1):75-93.score: 45.0
    Atheists have tacitly conceded the field to theists in the area of philosophical cosmology, specifically, in the enterprise of explaining why the universe exists. The theistic hypothesis is that the reason the universe exists lies in God’s creative choice, but atheists have not proposed any reason why the universe exists. I argue that quantum cosmology proposes such an atheistic reason, namely, that the universe exists because it has an unconditional probability of existing based on a functional law of nature. This (...)
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  12. Quentin Smith (1994). Stephen Hawking's Cosmology and Theism. Analysis 54 (4):236-243.score: 45.0
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  13. Ian Hacking (2013). Hawking Incorporated: Stephen Hawking and the Anthropology of the Knowing Subject. Common Knowledge 19 (3):553-554.score: 45.0
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  14. Ian Hacking (2013). Hawking Incorporated: Stephen Hawking and the Anthropology of the Knowing Subject by Hélène Mialet (Review). Common Knowledge 19 (3):553-554.score: 45.0
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  15. Antony Flew (1996). Stephen Hawking and the Mind of God. Cogito 10 (1):55-60.score: 45.0
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  16. A. Berezin (1997). In Search of a Key to the Universal Emergence: Comments on K. Sharpe's''The Origin of the Big Bang Universe in Ultimate Reality with Special Reference to the Cosmology of Stephen Hawking''. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 20 (1):72-73.score: 45.0
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  17. Michał Heller (1997). Dyskusja Hawking - Penrose [recenzja] Stephen Hawking, Roger Penrose, Natura czasu i przestrzeni, 1996. Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 20.score: 45.0
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  18. Francisco Jose Soler Gil (2007). Die prasentistische Auffassung der Zeit im Kontext der Relativitatstheorien und der Quantenkosmologie von James Hartle und Stephen Hawking: Ein Vergleich (Teil II) Prasentismus und Quantenkosmologie. Philosophia Naturalis 44 (1):144-180.score: 45.0
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  19. Francisco José Soler Gil (2007). Die präsentistische Auffassung der Zeit im Kontext der Relativitätstheorien und der Quantenkosmologie von James Hartle und Stephen Hawking: Ein Vergleich
    (Teil I) Präsentismus und Relativität.
    Philosophia Naturalis 44 (1):114-143.
    score: 45.0
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  20. Goran Punda (2011). Stephen Hawking I Leonard Mlodinow-Velebni Plan. Kairos: Evanđeoski Teološki Časopis 5 (2):363-366.score: 45.0
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  21. Kevin Sharpe (1997). The Origin of the Big Bang Universe in Ultimate Reality with Special Reference to the Cosmology of Stephen Hawking. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 20 (1):61-71.score: 45.0
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  22. Michel Siggen (2011). L'Univers Sans Dieu de Stephen Hawking. Nova Et Vetera 86 (4):485-495.score: 45.0
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  23. Francisco José Soler Gil (2007). Die präsentistische Auffassung der Zeit im Kontext der Relativitätstheorien und der Quantenkosmologie von James Hartle und Stephen Hawking: Ein Vergleich (Teil II) Präsentismus und Quantenkosmologie. Philosophia Naturalis 44 (1):144-180.score: 45.0
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  24. Peter J. Susalla (2013). Stephen Hawking: A Biography. The European Legacy 18 (7):966-967.score: 45.0
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  25. James F. Woodward (2002). Book Review: The Future of Spacetime. By Stephen W. Hawking, Kip S. Thorne, Igor Novikov, Timothy Ferris, Alan Lightman, and Richard Price. W. W. Norton, New York and London, 2002, 220 Pp., $25.95 (Hardcover). ISBN 0-393-02022-3. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (9):1485-1491.score: 36.0
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  26. C. Klein (1995). Steven Weinberg, Der Traum von der Einheit des Universums (uebersetzt von Friedrich Griese) und Stephen W. Hawking, Einsteins Traum (uebersetzt von Hainer Kober). Journal for General Philosophy of Science 26:354-363.score: 36.0
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  27. Sasan Haghighi (2012). Misappreciation Between Philosophy and Science. In TU Delft: Philosophy Day.score: 30.0
  28. Huw Price, Hawking's History of Time: A Plea for the Missing Page.score: 24.0
    One of the outstanding achievements of recent cosmology has been to offer some prospect of a unified explanation of temporal asymmetry. The explanation is in two main parts, and runs something like this. First, the various asymmetries we observe are all thermodynamic in origin – all products of the fact that we live in an epoch in which the universe is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Second, this thermodynamic disequilibrium is associated with the condition of the universe very soon after the (...)
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  29. G. Belot, J. Earman & and L. Ruetsche (1999). The Hawking Information Loss Paradox: The Anatomy of Controversy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):189-229.score: 24.0
    Stephen Hawking has argued that universes containing evaporating black holes can evolve from pure initial states to mixed final ones. Such evolution is non-unitary and so contravenes fundamental quantum principles on which Hawking's analysis was based. It disables the retrodiction of the universe's initial state from its final one, and portends the time-asymmetry of quantum gravity. Small wonder that Hawking's paradox has met with considerable resistance. Here we use a simple result for C*-algebras to offer an (...)
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  30. John Cramer, Hawking's Retreat.score: 24.0
    Seattle, the city where I live, teach, and do physics research, is the home of Paul Allen’s new Science Fiction Museum (SFM), located in the Experience Music Project building at Seattle Center, in the shadow of the Space Needle. The SFM is well worth a visit, offering a fascinating display of collected TV and movie props (e.g., Captain Kirk’s Chair from Star Trek ), SF memorabilia, and treasured books and manuscripts from the classic works of science fiction. In early December (...)
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  31. Gordon Belot, John Earman & Laura Ruetsche (1999). The Hawking Information Loss Paradox: The Anatomy of a Controversy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (2):189 - 229.score: 24.0
    Stephen Hawking has argued that universes containing evaporating black holes can evolve from pure initial states to mixed final ones. Such evolution is non-unitary and so contravenes fundamental quantum principles on which Hawking's analysis was based. It disables the retrodiction of the universe's initial state from its final one, and portends the time-asymmetry of quantum gravity. Small wonder that Hawking's paradox has met with considerable resistance. Here we use a simple result for C*-algebras to offer an (...)
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  32. Daan Evers (2013). Weight for Stephen Finlay. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.score: 18.0
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
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  33. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Stephen Jay Gould. In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.score: 18.0
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
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  34. W. G. Unruh (2014). Has Hawking Radiation Been Measured? Foundations of Physics 44 (5):532-545.score: 18.0
    It is argued that Hawking radiation has indeed been measured and shown to posses a thermal spectrum, as predicted. This contention is based on three separate legs. The first is that the essential physics of the Hawking process for black holes can be modelled in other physical systems. The second is the white hole horizons are the time inverse of black hole horizons, and thus the physics of both is the same. The third is that the quantum emission, (...)
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  35. Lawrence Cahoone (2009). Arguments From Nothing: God and Quantum Cosmology. Zygon 44 (4):777-796.score: 15.0
    This essay explores a simple argument for a Ground of Being, objections to it, and limitations on it. It is nonsensical to refer to Nothing in the sense of utter absence, hence nothing can be claimed to come from Nothing. If, as it seems, the universe, or any physical ensemble containing it, is past-finite, it must be caused by an uncaused Ground. Speculative many-worlds, pocket universes and multiverses do not affect this argument, but the quantum cosmologies of Alex Vilenkin, and (...)
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  36. Ned Markosian (1995). On the Argument From Quantum Cosmology Against Theism. Analysis 55 (4):247 - 251.score: 15.0
    In a recent Analysis article, Quentin Smith argues that classical theism is inconsistent with certain consequences of Stephen Hawking's quantum cosmology.1 Although I am not a theist, it seems to me that Smith's argument fails to establish its conclusion. The purpose of this paper is to show what is wrong with Smith's argument. According to Smith, Hawking's cosmological theory includes what Smith calls "Hawking's wave function law." Hawking's wave function law (hereafter, "HL") apparently has, among (...)
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  37. Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy (1996). Emerging From Imaginary Time. Synthese 108 (2):185 - 203.score: 15.0
    Recent models in quantum cosmology make use of the concept of imaginary time. These models all conjecture a join between regions of imaginary time and regions of real time. We examine the model of James Hartle and Stephen Hawking to argue that the various no-boundary attempts to interpret the transition from imaginary to real time in a logically consistent and physically significant way all fail. We believe this conclusion also applies to quantum tunneling models, such as that proposed (...)
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  38. Quentin Smith (1997). Simplicity and Why the Universe Exists. Philosophy 72 (279):125 - 132.score: 15.0
    If big bang cosmology is true, then the universe began to exist about 15 billion years ago with a 'big bang', an explosion of matter, energy and space from a singular point. This singularity is spatially and temporally pointlike; that is, it has zero spatial dimensions and exists for an instant (at t=0) before exploding with a 'big bang'. The big bang singularity is also lawless; Stephen Hawking writes: A singularity is a place where the classical concepts of (...)
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  39. William Lane Craig (1993). Theism, Atheism, and Big Bang Cosmology. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    Contemporary science presents us with the remarkable theory that the universe began to exist about fifteen billion years ago with a cataclysmic explosion called "the Big Bang." The question of whether Big Bang cosmology supports theism or atheism has long been a matter of discussion among the general public and in popular science books, but has received scant attention from philosophers. This book sets out to fill this gap by means of a sustained debate between two philosophers, William Lane Craig (...)
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  40. Mikael Stenmark (1997). What is Scientism? Religious Studies 33 (1):15-32.score: 15.0
    In this article I try to define more precisely what scientism is and how it is related to a traditional religion such as Christianity. By first examining the writing of a number of contemporary natural scientists (Francis Crick, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan and Edward O. Wilson), I show that the concept can be given numerous different meanings. I propose and defend a distinction between epistemic, rationalistic, ontological, axiological and redemptive scientism and it is also explained why (...)
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  41. Quentin Smith (1998). Swinburne's Explanation of the Universe. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 34 (1):91-102.score: 15.0
    Swinburne's Is There A God? presents a brief, updated version of his book, The Existence of God, in which Swinburne argued that criteria used in scientific reasoning could be used to argue that God probably exists. This new book is designed for a wider audience than professional philosophers. Nonetheless, there is much that is new and of interest to philosophers in Is There a God? For example, there is a discussion of Stephen Hawking's cosmology, some new ideas in (...)
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  42. Wojciech P. Grygiel (2013). Multiverse, M-Theory, and God the Creator. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (1):23-35.score: 15.0
    From a physical point of view, the no-boundary Hartle-Hawking model put forward in 1983 was an attempt to demonstrate that the incorporation of quantum effects into the general theory of relativity would solve the problem of singularities that make the theory of relativity incomplete. This was achieved by imposing the so called “no-boundary conditions” whereby the Universe could emerge with non-zero probability from a non-existing state. Stephen Hawking quickly turned this result into a metaphysical claim that physical (...)
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  43. Huw Price, Nature 348 Nature 350.score: 15.0
    The arrow of time is one of the big unclaimed prizes of modern physics. The problem is to reconcile the temporal asymmetry of thermodynamics with the apparent temporal symmetry of fundamental physical theories. Some major players have wrestled with the issue over the past century or so, but is still up for grabs--and very much in the air of late, having been discussed in recent books by Stephen Hawking..
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  44. Andrew Ross (2005). Roads to Reality: Penrose and Wolfram Compared Contenders. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (2):78-83.score: 15.0
    Sir Roger Penrose, retired professor of mathematics at the University of Oxford and collaborator with Stephen Hawking on black hole theory, has written 'a complete guide to the laws of the universe' called The Road to Reality. His publisher calls it the most important and ambitious work of science for a generation. Penrose caused a furore in the world of consciousness studies with his 1989 book The Emperor's New Mind, which conjectured a new mechanism for consciousness and kept (...)
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  45. C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.score: 15.0
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  46. Alan Haworth (1999). Only One Cheer for Sokal and Bricmont: Or, Scientism is No Response to Relativism. Res Publica 5 (1):1-20.score: 15.0
    Macaulay was wrong: The British public in one of its periodic fits of morality may be a ridiculous spectacle but it has at least one rival in the reaction we have recently witnessed to ‘cultural relativism’, ‘postmodernism’, and suchlike phenomena. One good illustration of the point is the argument of Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont's Intellectual Impostures (1998: London, Profile Books). Sokal and Bricmont spend the greater part of their time holding various postmodernist writers up to ridicule, and it would (...)
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  47. Stephen Makin (2000). Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.score: 15.0
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
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  48. Karl Giberson & Mariano Artigas (2007). Oracles of Science: Celebrity Scientists Versus God and Religion. OUP USA.score: 15.0
    Karl Giberson and Mariano Artigas offer an informed analysis on the views of Stephen Jay Gould, Richard Dawkins, Edward O. Wilson, Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking and Steven Weinberg; carefully distinguishing science from philosophy and religion in the writings of the oracles.
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