28 found
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  1.  38
    Douglas P. Peters & Stephen J. Ceci (1982). Peer-Review Practices of Psychological Journals: The Fate of Published Articles, Submitted Again. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):187-195.
    A growing interest in and concern about the adequacy and fairness of modern peer-review practices in publication and funding are apparent across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Although questions about reliability, accountability, reviewer bias, and competence have been raised, there has been very little direct research on these variables.
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  2.  23
    Stephen J. Ceci, Mary Lyndia Crotteau Huffman, Elliott Smith & Elizabeth F. Loftus (1994). Repeatedly Thinking About a Non-Event: Source Misattributions Among Preschoolers. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):388-407.
    In this paper we review the factors alleged to be responsible for the creation of inaccurate reports among preschool-aged children, focusing on so-called "source misattribution errors." We present the first round of results from an ongoing program of research that suggests that source misattributions could be a powerful mechanism underlying children′s false beliefs about having experienced fictitious events. Preliminary findings from this program of research indicate that all children of all ages are equally susceptible to making source misattributions. Data from (...)
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  3.  4
    Stephen J. Ceci, Dan M. Kahan & Donald Braman (2010). The WEIRD Are Even Weirder Than You Think: Diversifying Contexts is as Important as Diversifying Samples. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):87-88.
    We argue that Henrich et al. do not go far enough in their critique: Sample diversification, while important, will not lead to the detection of generalizable principles. For that it will be necessary to broaden the range of contexts in which data are gathered. We demonstrate the power of contexts to alter results even in the presence of sample diversification.
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  4.  9
    Mary Lyn Huffman, Angela M. Crossman & Stephen J. Ceci (1997). “Are False Memories Permanent?”: An Investigation of the Long-Term Effects of Source Misattributions. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):482-490.
    With growing concerns over children's suggestibility and how it may impact their reliability as witnesses, there is increasing interest in determining the long-term effects of induced memories. The goal of the present research was to learn whether source misattributions found by Ceci, Huffman, Smith, and Loftus caused permanent memory alterations in the subjects tested. When 22 children from the original study were reinterviewed 2 years later, they recalled 77% of all true events. However, they only consented to 13% of all (...)
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  5.  44
    Urie Bronfenbrenner & Stephen J. Ceci (1998). Could the Answer Be Talent? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):409-410.
    We present a theoretical model and corresponding research design (Bronfenbrenner & Ceci 1994) that could yield stronger evidence for (or perhaps against) Howe et al.'s conclusions. The model assesses levels of heritability (h²) under different amounts of training and practice, thus providing estimates of the independent contribution of “innate talent” to the quality of development outcomes. The design can also reveal the extent to which this independent contribution varies systematically as a function of other influential factors identified by Howe et (...)
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  6.  22
    Stephen J. Ceci, Wendy M. Williams & Katrin Mueller-Johnson (2006). Is Tenure Justified? An Experimental Study of Faculty Beliefs About Tenure, Promotion, and Academic Freedom. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):553-569.
    The behavioral sciences have come under attack for writings and speech that affront sensitivities. At such times, academic freedom and tenure are invoked to forestall efforts to censure and terminate jobs. We review the history and controversy surrounding academic freedom and tenure, and explore their meaning across different fields, at different institutions, and at different ranks. In a multifactoral experimental survey, 1,004 randomly selected faculty members from top-ranked institutions were asked how colleagues would typically respond when confronted with dilemmas concerning (...)
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  7. Maggie Bruck, Stephen J. Ceci, Emmett Francouer & Ashley Renick (1995). Anatomically Detailed Dolls Do Not Facilitate Preschoolers' Reports of a Pediatric Examination Involving Genital Touching. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 1 (2):95.
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  8.  4
    Douglas P. Peters & Stephen J. Ceci (1982). Peer-Review Research: Objections and Obligations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):246.
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  9.  4
    Maggie Bruck, Stephen J. Ceci & Emmett Francoeur (1999). The Accuracy of Mothers' Memories of Conversations with Their Preschool Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 5 (1):89.
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  10.  14
    Allen Esterson & Stephen J. Ceci (2006). Freud Did Not Anticipate Modern Reconstructive Memory Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):517-518.
    In this commentary, we challenge the claim that Freud's thinking anticipated Bartlettian reconstructive theories of remembering. Erdelyi has ignored important divergences that demonstrate it is not the case that “The constructions and reconstructions of Freud and Bartlett are the same but for motive” (target article, sect. 5).
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  11.  11
    Stephen J. Ceci, Matthew Scullin & Tomoe Kanaya (2003). The Difficulty of Basing Death Penalty Eligibility on Iq Cutoff Scores for Mental Retardation. Ethics and Behavior 13 (1):11 – 17.
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  12.  10
    Stephen J. Ceci, Wendy M. Williams & Katrin Mueller-Johnson (2006). Tenure and Academic Freedom: Prospects and Constraints. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):586-592.
    In our target article, we took the position that tenure conveys many important benefits but that its original justification – fostering academic freedom – is not one of them. Here we respond to various criticisms of our study as well as to proposals to remedy the current state of affairs. Undoubtedly, more research is needed to confirm and extend our findings, but the most reasonable conclusion remains the one we offered – that the original rationale for tenure is poorly served (...)
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  13. Urie Bronfenbrenner & Stephen J. Ceci (1994). Nature-Nuture Reconceptualized in Developmental Perspective: A Bioecological Model. Psychological Review 101 (4):568-586.
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  14. Stephen J. Ceci, David F. Ross & Michael P. Toglia (1987). Suggestibility of Children's Memory: Psycholegal Implications. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (1):38-49.
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  15.  1
    Douglas P. Peters & Stephen J. Ceci (1985). Peer Review: Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):747.
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  16.  1
    Helene Hembrooke & Stephen J. Ceci (1995). Traumatic Memories: Do We Need to Invoke Special Mechanisms? Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):75-82.
  17. Maggie Bruck, Stephen J. Ceci & Emmett Francoeur (2000). Children's Use of Anatomically Detailed Dolls to Report Genital Touching in a Medical Examination: Developmental and Gender Comparisons. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 6 (1):74-83.
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  18. Stephen J. Ceci & Jeffrey K. Liker (1986). A Day at the Races: A Study of IQ, Expertise, and Cognitive Complexity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 115 (3):255-266.
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  19. Stephen J. Ceci & Jeffrey K. Liker (1987). A Day at the Races: A Study of IQ, Expertise, and Cognitive Complexity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (2):90-90.
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  20. Stephen J. Ceci, Michael P. Toglia & David F. Ross (1988). On Remembering… More or Less: A Trace Strength Interpretation of Developmental Differences in Suggestibility. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (2):201-203.
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  21. Stephen J. Ceci, Stanka A. Fitneva & Wendy M. Williams (2010). Representational Constraints on the Development of Memory and Metamemory: A Developmental–Representational Theory. Psychological Review 117 (2):464-495.
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  22. Stephen J. Ceci & Jeffrey K. Liker (1988). Stalking the IQ€Xpertise Relation: When the Critics Go Fishing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (1):96-100.
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  23. Stephen J. Ceci & Jeffrey K. Liker (1988). "Stalking the IQ-Expertise Relation: When the Critics Go Fishing": Correction to Ceci and Liker. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (4):394-394.
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  24. Stephen J. Ceci & Wendy M. Williams (2015). The Psychology of Psychology: A Thought Experiment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  25. Stephen J. Ceci & Wendy M. Williams (2015). Women Have Substantial Advantage in STEM Faculty Hiring, Except When Competing Against More-Accomplished Men. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  26. Jeffrey K. Liker & Stephen J. Ceci (1987). IQ and Reasoning Complexity: The Roles of Experience. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (3):304-306.
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  27. Matthew H. Scullin, Tomoe Kanaya & Stephen J. Ceci (2002). Measurement of Individual Differences in Children's Suggestibility Across Situations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 8 (4):233-246.
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  28. Michael P. Toglia, David G. Payne, Narina L. Nightingale & Stephen J. Ceci (1989). Event Memory Under Naturalistically Induced Stress. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (5):405-408.
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