Search results for 'Stephen John Nash' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Stephen John Nash (2004). On Closure in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (1):75-89.
    While attempting to avoid closure, it can be argued that two of the analytical techniques employed by Lawson (1997) strongly imply closure. First, while ostensibly directed at liberating analysis from all forms of closure, the demi?reg is shown to effectively rely on implied closure. Second, when the use of control groups is compared to Mäki's method of isolation, it can be shown that Lawson implies substantially similar closure to that which is proposed by Mäki. Such implied forms of closure generally (...)
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  2.  1
    Susan M. Nash, Brenda J. Anderson, Teresa L. Reed, John W. Parrish & Stephen F. Davis (1986). Reward and Nonreward Odor Cues: The Role of the Harderian Gland. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (2):141-144.
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  3. Richard Nash (1991). John Craige's Mathematical Principles of Christian Theology. Southern Illinois University.
    First published in Latin in 1699, John Craige’s _Theology _represents a rare early attempt to introduce mathematical reasoning into moral and theological dispute. Craige’s effort to determine the earliest possible date of the Apocalypse earned him ridicule as an eccentric and a crank. Yet, Richard Nash argues, the intensity of the response to Craige’s work testifies to how widely felt the conflict was between the old and newly emergent notions of probability.
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  4. Leslie Stephen (2012). The English Utilitarians: Volume 3, John Stuart Mill. Cambridge University Press.
    Leslie Stephen, author, literary critic, social commentator and the first editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, published his two-volume History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century in 1876. This led him to further investigation and study of utilitarianism, whose proponents believed that human action should be guided by the principle of ensuring the happiness of the greatest number of people. While working on many other projects, especially the Dictionary, and haunted by domestic tragedy in the sudden death (...)
     
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  5. James Fitzjames Stephen (1992). Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: And Three Brief Essays. University of Chicago Press.
    With great energy and clarity, Sir James Fitzjames Stephen (1829-1894), author of History of the Criminal Law of England, and judge of the High Court from 1879-91, challenges John Stuart Mill's On Liberty and On Utilitarianism, arguing that ...
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  6.  4
    Roderick Nash (1991). John Young: Sustaining the Earth. Environmental Ethics 13 (3):281-281.
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  7. Leslie Stephen, The English Utilitarians: John Stuart Mill.
     
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  8. Leslie Stephen (1901). The English Utilitarians Jeremy Bentham Jamen Mill John Stuart Mill. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 9 (1):8-9.
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  9. Leslie Stephen (2011). The English Utilitarians 3 Volume Paperback Set. Cambridge University Press.
    Leslie Stephen, author, literary critic, social commentator and the first editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, published his two-volume History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century in 1876. This led him to further investigation and study of utilitarianism, whose proponents believed that human action should be guided by the principle of ensuring the happiness of the greatest number of people. While working on many other projects, especially the Dictionary, and haunted by domestic tragedy in the sudden death (...)
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  10.  1
    Stephen F. Davis, Susan M. Nash, Kirk A. Young, Melanie S. Weaver, Brenda J. Anderson & Joann Buchanan (1984). An Assessment of the Unconditioned Stimulus Properties of Reward and Nonreward Odor Cues. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (3):235-238.
  11.  22
    James A. Dixon, John G. Holden, Daniel Mirman & Damian G. Stephen (2012). Multifractal Dynamics in the Emergence of Cognitive Structure. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):51-62.
    The complex-systems approach to cognitive science seeks to move beyond the formalism of information exchange and to situate cognition within the broader formalism of energy flow. Changes in cognitive performance exhibit a fractal (i.e., power-law) relationship between size and time scale. These fractal fluctuations reflect the flow of energy at all scales governing cognition. Information transfer, as traditionally understood in the cognitive sciences, may be a subset of this multiscale energy flow. The cognitive system exhibits not just a single power-law (...)
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  12.  94
    Stephen John (2011). Expert Testimony and Epistemological Free-Riding: The Mmr Controversy. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):496-517.
    Using the controversy over the MMR vaccine, I consider the reasons why non-experts should defer to experts, and I sketch a model for understanding cases where they fail to defer. I first suggest that an intuitively plausible model of the expert/non-expert relationship is complicated by shifting epistemic standards. One possible moderate response to this challenge, based on a more complex notion of non-experts' relationship with experts, seems unappealing as an account of the MMR controversy. A more radical suggestion is that (...)
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  13.  13
    Stephen John (2015). Inductive Risk and the Contexts of Communication. Synthese 192 (1):79-96.
    In recent years, the argument from inductive risk against value free science has enjoyed a revival. This paper investigates and clarifies this argument through means of a case-study: neonicitinoid research. Sect. 1 argues that the argument from inductive risk is best conceptualised as a claim about scientists’ communicative obligations. Sect. 2 then shows why this argument is inapplicable to “public communication”. Sect. 3 outlines non-epistemic reasons why non-epistemic values should not play a role in public communicative contexts. Sect. 4 analyses (...)
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  14.  84
    Stephen John (2010). In Defence of Bad Science and Irrational Policies: An Alternative Account of the Precautionary Principle. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):3 - 18.
    In the first part of the paper, three objections to the precautionary principle are outlined: the principle requires some account of how to balance risks of significant harms; the principle focuses on action and ignores the costs of inaction; and the principle threatens epistemic anarchy. I argue that these objections may overlook two distinctive features of precautionary thought: a suspicion of the value of “full scientific certainty”; and a desire to distinguish environmental doings from allowings. In Section 2, I argue (...)
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  15. John Bowers Matthews, Kenneth E. Goodpaster & Laura L. Nash (1985). Policies and Persons a Casebook in Business Ethics.
     
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  16.  56
    Stephen John (2013). Efficiency, Responsibility and Disability: Philosophical Lessons From the Savings Argument for Pre-Natal Diagnosis. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):1470594-13505412.
    Pre-natal-diagnosis technologies allow parents to discover whether their child is likely to suffer from serious disability. One argument for state funding of access to such technologies is that doing so would be “cost-effective”, in the sense that the expected financial costs of such a programme would be outweighed by expected “benefits”, stemming from the births of fewer children with serious disabilities. This argument is extremely controversial. This paper argues that the argument may not be as unacceptable as is often assumed. (...)
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  17.  19
    Stephen John (2015). The Example of the IPCC Does Not Vindicate the Value Free Ideal: A Reply to Gregor Betz. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (1):1-13.
    In a recent paper, Gregor Betz has defended the value-free ideal: “the justification of scientific findings should not be based on non-epistemic values”against the methodological critique, by reference to the work of the International Panel on Climate Change . This paper argues that Betz’s defence is unsuccessful. First, Betz’s argument is sketched, and it is shown that the IPCC does not avoid the need to “translate” claims. In Section 2, it is argued that Betz mischaracterises the force of the (...)
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  18.  9
    Stephen John (2010). Three Worries About Three Arguments for Research Exceptionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):67-69.
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  19.  53
    Stephen John (2009). Why 'Health' is Not a Central Category for Public Health Policy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):129-143.
    We normally think that public health policy is an important political activity. In turn, we normally understand the value of public health policy in terms of the promotion of health or some health-related good (such as opportunity for health), on the basis of the assumption that health is an important constituent or determinant of wellbeing. In this paper, I argue that the assumption that the value of public health policy should be understood in terms of health leads us to overlook (...)
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  20.  1
    Stephen John (2015). Efficiency, Responsibility and Disability. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):3-22.
    Pre-natal-diagnosis technologies allow parents to discover whether their child is likely to suffer from serious disability. One argument for state funding of access to such technologies is that doing so would be “cost-effective”, in the sense that the expected financial costs of such a programme would be outweighed by expected “benefits”, stemming from the births of fewer children with serious disabilities. This argument is extremely controversial. This paper argues that the argument may not be as unacceptable as is often assumed. (...)
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  21.  43
    Stephen John (2012). Mind the Gap. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):218-220.
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  22.  10
    Stephen John (2015). Alex Broadbent Philosophy of Epidemiology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (3):707-711.
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  23.  54
    Stephen John (2004). Titanic Ethics, Pirate Ethics, Bio-Ethics: Essay Review of Paul, Miller and Paul, Eds., Bioethics. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Series C 35 (21):177-184.
  24.  11
    Stephen John (forthcoming). Risk and Precaution. Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice:67--84.
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  25.  30
    Stephen John (2011). Security, Knowledge and Well-Being. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):68-91.
    This paper investigates whether being “physically insecure” (being at risk of not continuing to meet one's physical needs in the future) should be thought of as a constituent of current wellbeing. In §1, it is argued that we cannot understand the value of security in terms of “freedom from fear”. In §2, it is argued that the reliablist approach to epistemology can help us to construct an account of why physical security is valuable, by relating security to the conditions of (...)
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  26.  31
    Z. Sadler John, Simon Craddock Lee Fabrice Jotterand & Stephen Inrig (2009). Can Medicalization Be Good? Situating Medicalization Within Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6).
    Medicalization has been a process articulated primarily by social scientists, historians, and cultural critics. Comparatively little is written about the role of bioethics in appraising medicalization as a social process. The authors consider what medicalization means, its definition, functions, and criteria for assessment. A series of brief case sketches illustrate how bioethics can contribute to the analysis and public policy discussion of medicalization.
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  27. John Nash, Friedrich von Hayek, James M. Buchanan, Thomas Schelling, Robert Kavesh, Philip Mirowski, Alain Enthoven, R. D. Laing, Clancy Sigal & Madsen Pirie (2012). The Pyramid Power. Philosophy 13.
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  28.  9
    Stephen David John (2009). Supreme Emergencies, Epistemic Murkiness and Epistemic Transparency. Philosophy of Management 8 (2):3-12.
    Sometimes, states face emergencies: situations where many individuals face an imminent threat of serious harm. Some believe that in such cases certain sorts of actions which are normally morally prohibited might be permissible. In this paper, I discuss this view as it applies in both the contexts of war and of public health policy. I suggest that the deontologist can best understand emergencies by analogy with the distinction between act- and rule consequentialism. In real world cases, we must often make (...)
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  29.  2
    Brenda J. Anderson, Susan M. Nash, Melissa Richard, David S. Dungan & Stephen F. Davis (1985). Prenatal Exposure to Aluminum or Stress: II. Behavioral and Performance Effects. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (6):524-526.
  30.  1
    Brenda J. Anderson, Julie A. Williams, Susan M. Nash, David S. Dungan & Stephen F. Davis (1985). Prenatal Exposure to Aluminum or Stress: I. Birth-Related and Developmental Effects. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (1):87-89.
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  31.  9
    Stephen John (2004). Titanic Ethics, Pirate Ethics, Bioethics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (1):177-184.
  32.  8
    Shanta Ratnayaka Stephen Skousgaard, J. Buckley John, Richard Hogan Robert Greenwood & S. McGinnis Robert (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  33. Leslie Stephen (1893). An Agnostic's Apology and Other Essays. Smith, Elder.
    The term 'agnostic' was probably coined by T. H. Huxley during a speech to the Metaphysical Society in 1869. From the Greek 'agnostos', 'unknown', it was derived from St Paul's mention of an Athenian altar inscribed 'to the unknown god'. With these overtones of ancient philosophy, agnosticism became the tag of an emergent school of thought which posited that the existence of anything beyond the material and measurable should be considered unknowable. In this collection of seven essays, first published as (...)
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  34. Stephen Bush, Hershey F., Vosburgh John & Kirby (forthcoming). Brittle System Analysis. Arxiv Preprint Cs/9904016.
    The goal of this paper is to define and analyze systems which exhibit brittle behavior. This behavior is characterized by a sudden and steep decline in performance as the system approaches the limits of tolerance. This can be due to input parameters which exceed a specified input, or environmental conditions which exceed specified operating boundaries. An analogy is made between brittle commmunication systems in particular and materials science.
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  35. John Hershey, Bush E., F. Stephen, Ralph Hoctor & T. (2006). Communications and Control—A Natural Linkage for SWARM. Journal of Network and Systems Management 14 (1):7--13.
    We present a simple distributed concept that appears to insinuate SWARM behavior in a collection of mobile platforms. The control is based on the inter-mobile platform communication links’ signal-to-noise ratio. This double use of communications is a natural linkage for SWARM behavior.
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  36. Hall Stephen John (2011). Custom, Enactment and Legal Order: A Natural Law Account. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 8 (1):1-36.
     
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  37. Stephen John (2010). In Defence of Bad Science and Irrational Policies: An Alternative Account of the Precautionary Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):3-18.
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  38. Stephen John (2009). Is There an Obligation to Participate in Medical Research? In Oonagh Corrigan, John McMillan, Kathleen Liddell, Martin Richards & Charles Weijer (eds.), The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. OUP Oxford
     
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  39. Stephen John (2004). Titanic Ethics, Pirate Ethics, Bioethics: Bioethics Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller, Jr., & Jeffrey Paul (Eds.); Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York & Melbourne, 2002, Pp. Xvii+ 396, Price£ 15.95 Paperback, ISBN 0-521-52526-8. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (1):177-184.
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  40. Stephen John (2004). Titanic Ethics, Pirate Ethics, Bioethics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):177-184.
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  41. Stephen John (forthcoming). The Moral Physiology of Inequality: Response to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination Vs Non-Interference’. Public Health Ethics:phv006.
    In this article, I respond to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities’. I first note a niggle about the paper’s assumption that lowering socio-economic inequalities will lower the social gradient in health. I then suggest two further ways in which neorepublicanism may relate to social epidemiology: in terms of ‘moral physiology’ and through analysing which inequalities are unjust.
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  42. Stephen John (2016). From Social Values to P‐Values: The Social Epistemology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):n/a-n/a.
    In this article I ask two questions prompted by the phenomenon of ‘politically patterned’ climate change denial. First, can an individual's political commitments provide her with good reasons not to defer to cognitive experts’ testimony? Building on work in philosophy of science on inductive risk, I argue they can. Second, can an individual's political commitments provide her with good reasons not to defer to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's testimony? I argue that they cannot, because of the high epistemic (...)
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  43.  6
    John F. McDiarmid (2012). Recovering Republican Eloquence: John Cheke Versus Stephen Gardiner on the Pronunciation of Greek. History of European Ideas 38 (3):338-351.
    The controversy over Greek pronunciation at Cambridge University in 1542, principally between university chancellor Stephen Gardiner and regius professor of Greek John Cheke, marked the emergence of not only the linguistic but also the political agenda of the mid-Tudor Cambridge humanists. This important group included future statesmen and political thinkers such as William Cecil, later Elizabeth's famous minister, Thomas Smith, author of De republica anglorum, and John Ponet, leading exponent of ?resistance theory?. In the 1542 Greek controversy (...)
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  44.  5
    William S. Hamrick (1975). "Tragic Wisdom and Beyond," by Gabriel Marcel, Trans. Stephen John and Peter McCormick. Modern Schoolman 53 (1):76-79.
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  45.  1
    Robert Gordon (2001). It's About Time: A History of Archaeological Dating in North America by Stephen E. Nash. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:144-145.
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  46.  14
    John L. Campbell, Paul Thomas, Neil Gross, Maureen Katz & Jonathon R. Zatlin (1998). Book Reviews. Peter Evans, Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation. Neera Chandhoke, State and Civil Society. Explorations in Political Theory. Kevin Anderson, Lenin, Hegel and Western Marxism. A Critical Study. Stephen Turner, The Social Theory of Practices: Tradition, Tacit Knowledge, and Presuppositions. Joel Whitebook, Perversion and Utopia: A Study in Psychoanalysis and Critical Theory. John C. Torpey, Intellectuals, Socialism, and Dissent. The East German Opposition and its Legacy. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 27 (1):103-146.
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  47.  7
    James Bohman, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Alan Brinkley, Tex Waco, James M. Buchanan, Richard A. Musgrave, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon & Christopher Cox (2001). G. John M. Abbarno, The Ethics of Homelessness. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999, 258 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 90-420-0777-X, $22.00 (Pb). Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel and Stephen R. Latham, Eds., The American Medical Ethics Revolution. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 396 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-8018-6170. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35:285-289.
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  48.  16
    Stratford Caldecott (1995). The Anatomy of Antiliberalism, by Stephen Holmes; The Undoing of Conservatism, by John Gray; Beyond Left and Right: The Future of Radical Politics by Anthony Giddens; Consumer Culture Reborn: The Cultural Politics of Consumption by Martyn J. Lee. The Chesterton Review 21 (3):367-374.
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  49.  3
    Lindsey Esbensen (2014). Health Care Ethics: Theological Foundations, Contemporary Issues, and Controversial Cases, Revised Edition by Michael R. Panicola, David M. Belde, John Paul Slosar, and Mark F. Repenshek, And: On Moral Medicine: Theological Perspectives in Medical Ethics, Third Edition Ed. By M. Therese Lysaught and Joseph J. Kotva Jr. With Stephen E. Lammers and Allen Verhey. [REVIEW] Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 34 (2):211-214.
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  50.  18
    Martin Davis (1990). Gödel Kurt. Über Die Vollständigkeit des Logikkalküls (1929). Collected Works, Volume I, Publications 1929–1936, by Kurt Gödel, Edited by Feferman Solomon, Dawson John W. Jr., Kleene Stephen C., Moore Gregory H., Solovay Robert M., and van Heijenoort Jean, Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, New York and Oxford 1986, Even Pp. 60–100. Gödel Kurt. On the Completeness of the Calculus of Logic (1929). English Translation by Stefan Bauer-Mengelberg and Jean van Heijenoort of the Preceding. Collected ... [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (1):341-342.
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