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Stephen L. Brock [16]Stephen Louis Brock [1]
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Profile: Stephen L. Brock (Pontifical University of the Holy Cross)
  1.  83
    Stephen L. Brock, What is the Use of Usus in Aquinas' Psychology of Action?
    The general aim of this paper is simply to draw attention to a certain theme in St Thomas' psychology of human action, one not often treated at much length in discussions of Aquinas on action. This theme is his notion of usus , "use", as a stage or component in the accomplishment of a complete human act. I shall begin by indicating some possible reasons for the general disregard of the theme, and shall then briefly note some rather striking affirmations (...)
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  2.  48
    Stephen L. Brock (2002). Can Atheism Be Rational? A Reading of Thomas Aquinas. Acta Philosophica: Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia 11 (2):215-238.
    Does St Thomas Aquinas have anything to teach us on the subject of atheism? We might doubt it, even if we share his basic outlook. The reason would be the very fact that in his day there were so few who did not share it. It was, as they say, an age of faith. The profession of some sort of religious belief, indeed monotheism, was virtually universal, not just in Europe but in practically all of what Europeans then knew of (...)
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  3.  31
    Stephen L. Brock (2002). Causality and Necessity in Thomas Aquinas. Quaestio 2 (1):217-240.
    The formulation is persuasive. Yet clearly it does assert a necessary connection between any occurrence and its antecedents. In order for a different result to occur, there has to be a corresponding difference in the antecedents. This means that from any determinate set of antecedents, a single determinate result must follow. It is a formula for determinism. Anscombe wants to caution us not to take what it says for granted.
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  4.  52
    Stephen L. Brock (2006). On Whether Aquinas's Ipsum Esse is “Platonism”. Review of Metaphysics 60 (2):269-303.
    Enrico Berti and others hold that Aquinas’s notion of God as ipsum esse subsistens conflicts with Aristotle’s view that positing an Idea of being treats being as a genus and nullifies all differences. The paper first shows how one of Aquinas’s ways of distinguishing esse from essence supposes an intimate tie between a thing’s esse and its differentia. Then it argues that for Aquinas the (one) divine essence differs from the (manifold) “essence of esse.” God is his very esse. This (...)
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  5.  19
    Stephen L. Brock (2012). God's Existence. Can It Be Proven? A Logical Commentary on the Five Ways of Thomas Aquinas. Review of Metaphysics 65 (3):693-695.
  6.  1
    Stephen L. Brock (2015). Practical Truth and Its First Principles in the Theory of Grisez, Boyle, and Finnis. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 15 (2):303-329.
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  7.  15
    Stephen L. Brock (2005). Natural Inclination and the Intelligibility of the Good in Thomistic Natural Law. Vera Lex (1-2):57-78.
    Size is not always a gauge of significance. The issue that I propose to address here centers on a single clause from the Summa theologiae. But it goes nearly to the heart of St Thomas's teaching on natural law. It concerns the way in which Thomas thinks the human mind comes to understand good and evil. The specific question raised by the clause is the role played in this process by what Thomas calls "natural inclination." This question leads to an (...)
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  8.  6
    Stephen L. Brock (2014). How Many Acts of Being Can a Substance Have?: An Aristotelian Approach to Aquinas’s Real Distinction. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (3):317-331.
    Focusing mainly on two passages from the Summa theologiae, the article first argues that, on Aquinas’s view, an individual substance, which is the proper subject of being, can and normally does have a certain multiplicity of acts of being . It is only “a certain” multiplicity because the substance has only one unqualified act of being, its substantial being, which belongs to it through its substantial form. The others are qualified acts of being, added on to the substantial being through (...)
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  9.  14
    Stephen L. Brock (2001). St Thomas and the Eucharistic Conversion. The Thomist 65 (4):529-565.
    Aquinas describes transubstantiation as a “conversion” of one substance into another. Yet he denies any common substrate underlying the succession of substances. Germain Grisez finds this unintelligible. The article's thesis is that Aquinas saw and resolved the basic issue contained in Grisez's objection. The key text stresses a “nature of being” common to the two substances. This nature, it is argued, is univocal. As such it constitutes a continuous object of signification that is both necessary and sufficient for the sacramental (...)
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  10.  13
    Stephen L. Brock (1993). The "Ratio Omnipotentiae" in Aquinas. Acta Philosophica 2 (1):17-42.
    Aquinas says that omnipotence means power for everything possible, which is everything not self-contradictory. This view faces various objections; to many of them, it seems that one could respond more easily by saying that omnipotence is God's power for everything that is not self-contradictory for Him to do. But this is a weak answer, and Thomas's support for it is only apparent. A more satisfactory solution is found in a fundamental restriction on the term "power" that Thomas thinks necessary when (...)
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  11.  2
    Stephen L. Brock (2014). How Many Acts of Being Can a Substance Have? International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (3):317-331.
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  12. Stephen L. Brock (2005). Is Uniqueness at the Root of Personal Dignity? John Crosby and Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist 69 (2):173-201.
     
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  13.  29
    Stephen L. Brock (2001). John Finnis, Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory:Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory. Ethics 111 (2):409-411.
  14.  2
    Stephen L. Brock (2010). Metafisica ed etica: la riapertura della questione dell'ontologia del bene. Acta Philosophica 19 (1):37-58.
    Since Hume, there has been broad consensus that if the notion of the good has any intelligible foundation, it is not “ontological”, in the natures of things. Today however this view is being challenged. After a sketch of the positions of Kant and Hume, and a glance at some of the recent challenges, the paper examines a key element in Thomas Aquinas’s ontol- ogy of the good: the notion of nal causality. For Thomas nal causality presupposes formal and e cient (...)
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  15. Stephen L. Brock (2010). Metaphysics and Ethics: The Reopening of a Question on Ontology of the Self. Acta Philosophica 19 (1).
     
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  16. Stephen L. Brock (2009). REVIEWS-Lawrence Dewan, OP, Wisdom, Law and Virtue: Essays in Thomistic Ethics. The Thomist 73 (3):497.