Search results for 'Stephen Lambert' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Lambert (2005). Third-Century Epigraphic Hands S. V. Tracy: Athens and Macedon. Attic Letter-Cutters of 300 to 229 B. C. (Hellenistic Culture and Society 38.) Pp. Xxii + 205, Ills. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 2003. Cased, US$75, £49.95. ISBN: 0-520-23333-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):322-.score: 240.0
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  2. Stephen D. Lambert (1982). A Thucydidean Scholium on the 'Lelantine War'. Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:216-220.score: 240.0
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  3. [deleted]Christian Lambert, Rumana Chowdhury, Thomas Fitzgerald, Stephen M. Fleming, Antoine Lutti, Chloe Hutton, Bogdan Draganski, Richard Frackowiak & John Ashburner (2013). Characterizing Aging in the Human Brainstem Using Quantitative Multimodal MRI Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Ageing is ubiquitous to the human condition. The MRI correlates of healthy ageing have been extensively investigated using a range of modalities, including volumetric MRI, quantitative MRI and DTI. Despite this, the reported brainstem related changes remain sparse. This is, in part, due to the technical and methodological limitations in quantitatively assessing and statistically analysing this region. By utilising a new method of brainstem segmentation, a large cohort of 100 healthy adults were assessed in this study for the effects of (...)
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  4. Stephen D. Lambert (2013). Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens by Nikolaos Papazarkadas (Review). American Journal of Philology 134 (3):507-510.score: 240.0
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  5. NursingDrug Handbook, Jay Allison, Thomas A. Narin, Earl Babbie, Stephen Lambert, Joel Best, Laura Penny & John Seeley Brown (2008). Presentation College Library--Lakota Campus—Fairmont Campus New Materials List December 2008. Philosophy 100:199.score: 240.0
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  6. Daan Evers (2013). Weight for Stephen Finlay. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.score: 24.0
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
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  7. Katherine Dunlop (2009). Why Euclid's Geometry Brooked No Doubt: J. H. Lambert on Certainty and the Existence of Models. Synthese 167 (1):33 - 65.score: 24.0
    J. H. Lambert proved important results of what we now think of as non-Euclidean geometries, and gave examples of surfaces satisfying their theorems. I use his philosophical views to explain why he did not think the certainty of Euclidean geometry was threatened by the development of what we regard as alternatives to it. Lambert holds that theories other than Euclid’s fall prey to skeptical doubt. So despite their satisfiability, for him these theories are not equal to Euclid’s in (...)
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  8. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Stephen Jay Gould. In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.score: 24.0
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
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  9. Katrina L. Sifferd (forthcoming). What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 24.0
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue that (...)
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  10. Calum Miller (forthcoming). Response to Stephen Law on the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism. Philosophia:1-6.score: 24.0
    Alvin Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism argues that the probability of our possessing reliable cognitive faculties, given the truth of evolution and naturalism, is low, and that this provides a defeater for naturalism, if the naturalist in question holds to the general truths of evolutionary biology. Stephen Law has recently objected to Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism by suggesting that there exist conceptual constraints governing the content a belief can have given its relationships to other things, including behaviour (CC). (...)
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  11. Stephen Makin (2000). Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.score: 21.0
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
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  12. Aaron Allen Schiller (2009). Colorblindness and Black Friends in Stephen Colbert’s America. In , Stephen Colbert and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 21.0
    Is there a contradiction in Stephen Colbert’s attitudes towards race? How can he consistently claim to be colorblind and yet hold a national search for a new "black friend"? I argue that Stephen is trying to claim rights and shirk responsibilities on matters of race relations in America, and that his famous notion of "truthiness" is an extension of this attitude to other areas of social and political discourse.
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  13. Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) (2011). Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown. Brill.score: 21.0
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
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  14. Paola Basso (2006). Un inedito dialogo giovanile di Johann Heinrich Lambert (1728-1777). Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia:1-16.score: 21.0
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  15. Stephen Galoob (forthcoming). Stephen Winter, Transitional Justice in Established Democracies: A Political Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.score: 21.0
    The fundamental question of political reparation is: why should a state provide redress for an injustice? The predominant answer justifies redress in terms of debts—the perpetration of an injustice creates a debt, and a state is required to make redress for the same reasons that it is required to repay its debts . Other approaches justify redress on the grounds that it will facilitate the achievement of some broader political goal, like the fair distribution of social resources or political reconciliation.In (...)
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  16. Enrico Pasini (2005). L'altra faccia dell'uomo della Luna. Lambert e l'Erfindungskunst. In Massimo Mori & Stefano Poggi (eds.), La Misura Dell’Uomo. Filosofia, Teologia E Scienza Nel Dibattito Antropologico in Germania (1760-1915). Il Mulino. 49-70.score: 21.0
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  17. José Montoya Sáenz (2014). J.F. Stephen: sobre la Fraternidad y el Amor Universal de Mill. Telos 19 (1-2):77-82.score: 21.0
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  18. Graham Oppy (1995). Professor William Craig's Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.score: 18.0
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
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  19. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):27-38.score: 18.0
    I argue that Stephen Houlgate misstates an element in the Kantian background to my reading of “Lordship and Bondage” (§2). He misreads my remarks about the need to see Hegel’s moves there in the context of the progression towards absolute knowing (§3), and, partly consequently, he fails to engage with the motivation for my reading (§4). And he does not understand the way my reading exploits the concept of allegory (§5).
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  20. Stephen Darwall (2009). The Second-Person Standpoint An Interview with Stephen Darwall. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):118-138.score: 18.0
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  21. Jonardon Ganeri (2010). The Study of Indian Epistemology: Questions of Method—a Reply to Matthew Dasti and Stephen H. Phillips. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):541-550.score: 18.0
    I would like to thank the editors of Philosophy East and West for courteously asking me if I would like to respond to Matthew Dasti and Stephen Phillips' very thoughtful remarks about the review I wrote of Phillips' translation and commentary on the pratyakṣa chapter of Gaṅgeśa's Tattvacintāmaṇi, prepared in collaboration with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya (Phillips and Tatacharya 2004). Let me begin by reaffirming what I said at the beginning of my review, that the book is "a monumental (...)
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  22. Justin Tiwald (2011). Stephen C. Angle: Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):231-235.score: 18.0
    Review of Stephen C. Angle's Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.
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  23. Charles Pigden (2010). Substance, Content, Taxonomy and Consequence: A Comment on Stephen Maitzen. In , Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave Macmillan. 313-319.score: 18.0
    This is a response to Stephen Maitzen’s paper. ‘Moral Conclusions from Nonmoral Premises’. Maitzen thinks that No-Ought-From-Is is false. He does not dispute the formal proofs of Schurz and myself, but he thinks they are beside the point. For what the proponents of No-Ought-From-Is need to show is not that you cannot get SUBSTANTIVELY moral conclusions from FORMALLY non-moral premises but that you cannot get SUBSTANTIVELY moral conclusions from SUBSTANTIVELY non-moral premises. And he believes that he can derive substantively (...)
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  24. A. Max Jarvie (2007). Unwrinkling the Carpet of Meaning: Stephen Schiffer, the Things We Mean. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):85-99.score: 18.0
    This article is a critical review of Stephen Schiffer’s monograph The Things We Mean . The text discusses some novel contributions made by Schiffer to the philosophy of meaning, in particular, Schiffer’s proposal for the reification of certain abstract entities and the application of his argument to the philosophical problem of vagueness in natural language. Special attention is paid both to Schiffer’s ingenious use of the notion of conservative extension , here employed as a criterion for distinguishing legitimate from (...)
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  25. Peter Pagin (2005). Review of Stephen Schiffer, The Things We Mean. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).score: 18.0
    After Meaning, 1972, and The Remnants of Meaning , 1987, The Things We Mean is Stephen Schiffer's third major work on the foundations of the theory of linguistic meaning. In simplest possible outline, the development started with a positive attempt to base a meaning theory on a modified Gricean account of utterance meaning, but took a negative turn, with the problems of belief sentences as a major reason for thinking that a systematic (compositional) semantic theory for natural language was (...)
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  26. William Dembski, An Analysis of Homer Simpson and Stephen Jay Gould.score: 18.0
    Note: The Simpson's, television's popular prime-time cartoon known for its satirical commentary on various social issues, recently took a shot at the creation-evolution debate by featuring Stephen Jay Gould prominently in one of its episodes. Here is Bill Dembski's review and observations of that episode.
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  27. Chia-Ling Wang (2011). Power/Knowledge for Educational Theory: Stephen Ball and the Reception of Foucault. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):141-156.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the significance of the concept of power/knowledge in educational theory. The argument proceeds in two main parts. In the first, I consider aspects of Stephen J. Ball's highly influential work in educational theory. I examine his reception of Foucault's concept of power/knowledge and suggest that there are problems in his adoption of Foucault's thought. These problems arise from the way that he settles interpretations into received ideas. Foucault's thought, I try to show, is not to be (...)
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  28. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.score: 18.0
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia (...)
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  29. Jaroslav Peregrin, Stephen Neale, Facing Facts, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001, Xv + 254 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    It is now often taken for granted that facts are entia non grata, for there exists a powerful argument (dubbed the slingshot), which is backed by such great names as Frege or Gödel or Davidson (and so could hardly be wrong), that discredits their existence. There indeed is such an argument, and it indeed is not wrong on the straightforward sense of wrong. However, in how far it knocks down any conception of facts is another story, a story which is (...)
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  30. Dan Ryder, Critical Notice of Stephen Mumford's Dispositions.score: 18.0
    Stephen Mumford's Dispositions1 is an interesting and thought-provoking addition to a recent surge of publications on the topic.2 Dispositions have not been such a hot topic since the heyday of behaviourism. But as Mumford argues in his first chapter, the importance of dispositions to contemporary philosophy can hardly be underestimated. Dispositions are fundamental to causal role functionalism in the philosophy of mind, response-dependent truth conditional accounts of moral and other concepts,3 capacity accounts of concepts more generally,4 theories of belief, (...)
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  31. Laurence Goldstein (2009). Stephen Clark, the Laws of Logic and the Sorites. Philosophy 84 (1):135-143.score: 18.0
    A standard method for refuting a set of claims is to show that it implies a contradiction. Stephen Clark questions this method on the grounds that the Law of Non-Contradiction, together with the other fundamental laws of logic do not accord with everyday reality. He accounts for vagueness by suggesting that, for any vague predicate 'F', an ordinary object is typically to some extent both F and not-F, and that objects do not change abruptly from being F to being (...)
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  32. Edward N. Zalta (1985). Lambert, Mally, and the Principle of Independence. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:447-459.score: 18.0
    In this paper, the author analyzes critically some of the ideas found in Karel Lambert's recent book, Meinong and the Principle of Independence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983). Lambert attempts to forge a link between the ideas of Meinong and the free logicians. The link comes in the form of a principle which, Lambert says, these philosophers adopt, namely, Mally's Principle of Independence, which Mally himself later abandoned. Instead of following Mally and attempting to formulate the principle (...)
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  33. Amitrajeet Batabyal (2012). Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):103-105.score: 18.0
    Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow: The Grand Design Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9298-7 Authors Amitrajeet A. Batabyal, Department of Economics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5604, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  34. Peter Kivy (2003). Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.score: 18.0
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. (...)
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  35. Robert Merrihew Adams (1993). Prospects for a Metaethical Argument for Theism: A Response to Stephen J. Sullivan. Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):313 - 318.score: 18.0
    Disagreements about the success of any given argument often arise because the suppositions of the critic differ from the suppositions of the author of the argument. In maintaining the plausibility of a metaethical argument for theism against the objections articulated by Stephen J. Sullivan, I will probe our differing suppositions with regard to the relation of theological to naturalistic metaethical theories, the starting point for the metaethical argument for theism, and the relation of the qualities of God's will to (...)
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  36. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate's Response. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):53-60.score: 18.0
    I offer an interpretation of the connection between judging and intuiting in Kant (§2). Next I try to clarify how the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, as I read it, fits in the Phenomenology’s progression towards absolute knowing (§3). In some detailed responses to Stephen Houlgate, I reiterate how my reading is motivated by the wish not to discard, or ignore, Hegel’s first formulation of what is to be achieved by the movement in the self-consciousness chapter, and I object (...)
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  37. Louise Antony (1991). A Pieced Quilt: A Critical Discussion of Stephen Schiffer'sRemnants of Meaning. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):119-137.score: 18.0
    Abstract Stephen Schiffer, in his recent book, Remnants of Meaning, argues against the possibility of any compositional theory of meaning for natural language. Because the argument depends on the premise that there is no possible naturalistic reduction of the intentional to the physical, Schiffer's attack on theories of meaning is of central importance for theorists of mind. I respond to Schiffer's argument by showing that there is at least one reductive account of the mental that he has neglected to (...)
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  38. Francisco J. Ayala, The Structure of Evolutionary Theory: On Stephen Jay Gould's Monumental Masterpiece.score: 18.0
    Stephen Jay Gould’s monumental The Structure of Evolutionary Theory ‘‘attempts to expand and alter the premises of Darwinism, in order to build an enlarged and distinctive evolutionary theory . . . while remaining within the tradition, and under the logic, of Darwinian argument.’’ The three branches or ‘‘fundamental principles of Darwinian logic’’ are, according to Gould: agency (natural selection acting on individual organisms), efficacy (producing new species adapted to their environments), and scope (accumulation of changes that through geological time (...)
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  39. Uwe Steinhoff (forthcoming). Stephen Kershnar, Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-3.score: 18.0
    Stephen Kershnar’s main argument in Gratitude toward Veterans is that Americans should not be very grateful towards veterans. More precisely, he not only argues that veterans do not deserve the gratitude that many Americans offer them, but also that it is morally objectionable to be grateful towards them. His argument is applicable to war veterans generally, not only to those in the USA. Yet, it does have specific relevance to the United States given that, as Kershnar demonstrates, public gratitude (...)
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  40. William Desmond (2005). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 36 (2):175-188.score: 18.0
    This is a response to issues raised by Stephen Houlgate in his article “Hegel, Desmond, and the Problem of God’s Transcendence,” dealing with Hegel’s God: A Counterfeit Double? The response focuses especially on the hermeneutical finesse we need in reading Hegel on religion, on the nature of “release” in Hegel, on the need for an agapeic God, and on the differences between Hegel’s speculative philosophy and Desmond’s metaxological approach to the practice of philosophy.
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  41. The Things We Mean & Stephen Schiffer (2005). The Things We Mean, by Stephen Schiffer. Disputatio.score: 18.0
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  42. Ethan Weed (2013). Stephen E. Palmer and Arthur P. Shimamura, Eds. Aesthetic Science. Estetika 50 (1):128-133.score: 18.0
    A review of Stephen E. Palmer´s and Arthur P. Shimamura´s (eds.) Aesthetic Science (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, xii + 408 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-973214-2).
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  43. Edward O. Wilson, Stephen J. Pope & Philip Hefner (2001). E. O. Wilson, Stephen Pope, and Philip Hefner: A Conversation. Zygon 36 (2):249-253.score: 18.0
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  44. Nathan Andersen (2003). Is Film the Alien Other to Philosophy?, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 18.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
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  45. Stephen L. Brock, Stephen L. Brock.score: 18.0
    Size is not always a gauge of significance. The issue that I propose to address here centers on a single clause from the Summa theologiae . But it goes nearly to the heart of St Thomas’s teaching on natural law. It concerns the way in which Thomas thinks the human mind comes to understand good and evil. The specific question raised by the clause is the role played in this process by what Thomas calls “natural inclination.” This question leads to (...)
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  46. Graham Harman (2012). Concerning Stephen Hawking's Claim That Philosophy is Dead. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):11-22.score: 18.0
    The article begins from Stephen Hawking's well-known claim that philosophy is dead, and considers several other quotations in which philosophy is either belittled or subordinated outright to the natural sciences. This subordination requires a downward reductionism that is paralleled by the upward reductionism of the linguistic turn and social constructionist theories. Rather than undermining or overmining mid-sized individual entities, philosophy must deal with objects on their own terms. This suggests a possible tactical alliance between philosophy and the arts.
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  47. Julian Baggini (2003). Alien Ways of Thinking, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).score: 18.0
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
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  48. Chris Renwick (2014). Response to Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):515-521.score: 18.0
    Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller’s commentaries on my paper “Completing Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at the London School of Economics during the 1930s” raises important questions about the historical entanglement of the political left, welfarism, biology, and social science. In this response, I clarify questions about my analysis of events at the London School of Economics in the early twentieth century and identify ways in which they are important in the present. I (...)
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  49. K. R. Hammerschlag (2013). Identifying the Patient in George W Lambert's Chesham Street. Medical Humanities 39 (1):20-28.score: 18.0
    This paper takes as its focus one of the Edwardian period's most dramatic and little-understood paintings of a medical examination: George Washington Lambert's Chesham Street (1910). The painting shows an upper-class male patient lifting his shirt to reveal a muscular torso for examination by the doctor in the scene and the viewers outside it. The subject of a medical examination, I argue, legitimised the scrutiny of exposed male flesh and offered an opportunity for sensual pleasure between men. By way (...)
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  50. Stephen Maitzen (2000). C. Stephen Evans, Faith Beyond Reason: A Kierkegaardian Account Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (2):98-99.score: 18.0
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