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  1. Stephen Leighton, On Pity and Its Appropriateness.
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  2. Stephen Leighton, Passion and Persuasion.
    Introduction to Blackwell’s Companion to Aristotle (edited by G. Anagnostopoulos, 2009).
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  3. Stephen Leighton, Robert Solomon (1942-2007).
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  4. Stephen Leighton, Unfelt Feelings in Pain and the Emotions.
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  5. Stephen Leighton (2003). Aristotle’s Exclusion of Anger From the Experience of Tragedy. Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):361-381.
  6. Stephen Leighton (ed.) (2003). Philosophy and the Emotions: A Reader. Broadview Press.
    While philosophical speculation into the nature and value of emotions is at least as old as the Pre-Socratics, William James' "What is an emotion?" reinvigorated interest in the question. Coming to grips with James' proposals, particularly in the light of subsequent concerns for the difficulties inherent in a so-called private language, led philosophers away from analyses centred on feelings to ones centred on thoughts. Analyzing the emotions in this way involves returning to a vision of the emotions that traces its (...)
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  7. Stephen Leighton (2002). Aristotle's Account of Anger: Narcissism and Illusions of Self-Sufficiency. Ratio 15 (1):23–45.
    This paper considers an allegation by M. Stocker and E. Hegeman that Aristotle’s account of anger yields a narcissistic passion bedevilled by illusions of self-sufficiency. The paper argues on behalf of Aristotle’s valuing of anger within a virtuous and flourishing life, showing that and why Aristotle’s account is neither narcissistic nor involves illusions of self-sufficiency. In so arguing a deeper appreciation of Aristotle’s understanding of a self-sufficient life is reached, as are some interesting contrasts between Aristotle's understanding of anger, its (...)
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  8. Stephen Leighton (2002). Jerome Neu, A Tear Is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion:A Tear Is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion. Ethics 112 (4):846-848.
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  9. Stephen Leighton (1995). THE VALUE OF PASSIONS IN PLATO AND ARISTOTLE. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (Supplement):41-56.
    This paper was originally presented at a Conference (the Ontological and Practical) held at the University of Texas at Austin, part of a celebration of the career of Doug Browning.
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  10. Stephen Leighton (1993). What We Love. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (2):145 – 158.
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  11. Stephen Leighton (1992). Relativizing Moral Excellence In Aristotle. Apeiron 25 (1):49 - 66.
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  12. Stephen Leighton (1992). The Mean Relative to Us. Apeiron 25 (4):67 - 78.
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  13. Stephen R. Leighton (1990). The Structure of Emotions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):115-127.
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  14. Stephen Leighton (1988). Aristotle's Courageous Passions. Phronesis 33 (1):76-99.
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  15. Stephen R. Leighton (1988). Modern Theories of Emotion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 2 (3):206-224.
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  16. Stephen R. Leighton (1988). On Feeling Angry and Elated. Journal of Philosophy 85 (May):253-264.
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  17. Stephen Leighton (1987). Helen Fay Nissenbaum, Emotion and Focus. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7:315-317.
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  18. Stephen R. Leighton (1987). Helen Fay Nissenbaum, Emotion and Focus Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (8):315-317.
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  19. Stephen R. Leighton (1986). Unfelt Feelings in Pain and Emotion. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):69-79.
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  20. Stephen R. Leighton (1985). A New View of Emotion. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (April):133-142.
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  21. Stephen R. Leighton (1984). Eudemian Ethics 1220b 11–13. Classical Quarterly 34 (01):135-.
    When characterizing ta pathē in the Eudemian Ethics Aristotle claims that they are usually accompanied by perceptual pleasure or pain. He says: λέγω δ πάθη μν τ τοιατα, θυμν όβον αδ πιθυμίαν, λως ος πεται ώς π τ πολ ασθητικ ήδον ἢ λύπη καθ' ατά. By affections I mean such things as anger, fear, shame, desire – in general anything which, as such, gives rise usually to perceptual pleasure and pain.
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  22. Stephen R. Leighton (1984). Feelings and Emotion. Review of Metaphysics 38 (December):303-320.
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  23. Stephen R. Leighton (1982). Aristotle and the Emotions. Phronesis 27 (2):144 - 174.
    Reprinted in Aristotle's Ethics, edited by T. Irwin, Garland Press, 1995; revised in Essays on Aristotle's Rhetoric, edited by A. Rorty, University of California Press, 1996.
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