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Profile: Stephen Turner (University of South Florida)
  1.  4
    Stephen P. Turner (2013). Explaining the Normative. Polity.
    The book considers in detail a paradigm case: legal normativity as constructed by Hans Kelsen. This case exemplifies the problems with normativist arguments.
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  2.  17
    Stephen P. Turner (1994). The Social Theory of Practices: Tradition, Tacit Knowledge, and Presuppositions. University of Chicago Press.
    The concept of "practices"--whether of representation, of political or scientific traditions, or of organizational culture--is central to social theory. In this book, Stephen Turner presents the first analysis and critique of the idea of practice as it has developed in the various theoretical traditions of the social sciences and the humanities. Understood broadly as a tacit understanding "shared" by a group, the concept of a practice has a fatal difficulty, Turner argues: there is no plausible mechanism by which a "practice" (...)
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  3. Stephen P. Turner (1987). The Survey in Nineteenth-Century American Geology: The Evolution of a Form of Patronage. [REVIEW] Minerva 25 (3):282-330.
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  4. Stephen P. Turner (2002). Brains/Practices/Relativism Social Theory After Cognitive Science. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5. Stephen P. Turner (2003). Liberal Democracy 3.0 Civil Society in an Age of Experts. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  6.  76
    Stephen P. Turner (2007). Explaining Normativity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):57-73.
    In this reply, I raise some questions about the account of "normativity" given by Joseph Rouse. I discuss the historical form of disputes over normativity in such thinkers as Kelsen and show that the standard issue with these accounts is over the question of whether there is anything added to the normal stream of explanation by the problem of normativity. I suggest that Rouse’s attempt to avoid the issues that arise with substantive explanatory theories of practices of the kind criticized (...)
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  7. Stephen P. Turner (1985). Weltgeist, Intention, and Reproduction: A Code. Sociological Theory 3 (1):23-28.
  8. Stephen P. Turner (1987). Cause, Law, and Probability. Sociological Theory 5 (1):15-19.
  9.  42
    Stephen P. Turner (2003). Cause, the Persistence of Teleology, and the Origins of the Philosophy of Social Science. In Stephen P. Turner and Paul Roth (ed.), Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. 21-42.
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  10.  26
    Stephen P. Turner (2007). Mirror Neurons and Practices: A Response to Lizardo. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (3):351–371.
    Lizardo argues that The Social Theory of Practices is refuted by the discovery of mirror neurons. The book argues that the kind of sameness of tacit mental content assumed by practice theorists such as Bourdieu is fictional, because there is no actual process by which the same mental content can be transmitted. Mirror neurons, Lizardo claims, provide such a mechanism, as they imply that bodily automatisms, which can be understood as the basis of habitus and concepts, can be shared and (...)
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  11. Stephen P. Turner (1984). Max Weber and the Dispute Over Reason and Value: A Study in Philosophy, Ethics, and Politics. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
     
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  12.  9
    Peter Olen & Stephen P. Turner (forthcoming). Was Sellars an Error Theorist? Synthese:1-23.
    Wilfrid Sellars described the moral syllogism that supports the inference “I ought to do x” from “Everyone ought to do x” as a “syntactical disguise” which embodies a “mistake.” He nevertheless regarded this form of reasoning as constitutive of the moral point of view. Durkheim was the source of much of this reasoning, and this context illuminates Sellars’ unusual philosophical reconstruction of the moral point of view in terms of the collective intentions of an ideal community of rational members for (...)
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  13.  38
    Stephen P. Turner (1999). Searle's Social Reality. History and Theory 38 (2):211–231.
  14. Stephen P. Turner (2009). Public Sociology and Democratic Theory. In Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.), The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan
  15.  25
    Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.) (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub..
    _The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences _collects newly commissioned essays that examine fundamental issues in the social sciences.
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  16.  64
    Stephen P. Turner (2009). Can There Be a Pragmatist Philosophy of Social Science? [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (3):365 - 374.
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  17.  8
    Stephen P. Turner (1982). On the Relevance of Statistical Relevance Theory. Theory and Decision 14 (2):195-205.
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  18.  32
    Stephen P. Turner (2011). Starting with Tacit Knowledge, Ending with Durkheim? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):472-476.
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  19.  1
    Stephen P. Turner (1998). Did Funding Matter to the Development of Research Methods in Sociology? Minerva 36 (1):69-79.
  20.  10
    David Mercer, Jerry Ravetz, Stephen P. Turner & Steve Fuller (2005). A Parting Shot at Misunderstanding: Fuller Vs. Kuhn. [REVIEW] Metascience 14 (1):3-152.
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  21. Stephen P. Turner (1989). Tacit Knowledg and the Problem of Computer Modelling Cognitive Processes in Science. In Steve Fuller (ed.), The Cognitive Turn: Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers
     
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  22.  14
    Stephen P. Turner (1993). Review Essays : The End of Functionalism: Parsons, Merton, and Their Heirs. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (2):228-228.
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  23.  19
    Stephen P. Turner & David R. Carr (1978). The Process of Criticism in Interpretive Sociology and History. Human Studies 1 (1):138 - 152.
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  24.  25
    Stephen P. Turner (2009). Shrinking Merton. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):481-489.
    Agassi, Sztompka, Kincaid, and Crothers argue, in various ways, that Merton should not be held responsible for his published views on theory construction, and they provide psychological or strategic explanations for his failure to resolve issues with these views. I argue that this line of defense is unnecessary. A better case for Merton would be that theories in his middle-range sense were a nontechnical alternative solution to the problem of spurious correlation. Middle-range theory was not, however, a solution to the (...)
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  25.  15
    Stephen P. Turner (1984). Social Theory Without Wholes. Human Studies 7 (3-4):259 - 284.
    Language is the tradition of nations; each generation describes what it sees, but it uses words transmitted from the past. When a great entity like the British Constitution has continued in connected outward sameness, but hidden inner change, for many ages, every generation inherits a series of inapt words — of maxims once true, but of which the truth is ceasing or has ceased. As a man’s family go on muttering in his maturity incorrect phrases derived from a just observation (...)
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  26.  23
    Stephen P. Turner (1997). Bad Practices: A Reply. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (3):345-356.
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  27.  14
    Regis A. Factor & Stephen P. Turner (1979). The Limits of Reason and Some Limitations of Weber's Morality. Human Studies 2 (1):301 - 334.
  28.  15
    Stephen P. Turner (2005). Normative All the Way Down. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):419-429.
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  29.  20
    Stephen P. Turner (1987). Underdetermination and the Promise of Statistical Sociology. Sociological Theory 5 (2):172-184.
    The lack of "progress" in theory is often contrasted to progress in statistical methodology. The relation between the two bodies of thinking is itself problematic, however, for the particular advances in method that have occurred in quantitative sociology reflect a trade-off in which the results are characterized by the radical underdetermination of models by data and a high level of slack between measures and theoretical concepts. Both of these problems are usually understood as matters of "error," and thus as potentially (...)
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  30.  6
    Stephen P. Turner & Regis A. Factor (1990). The Disappearance of Tradition in Weber. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):400-424.
  31.  9
    Stephen P. Turner (2007). Practice Relativism (Relativismo de Prácticas). Critica 39 (115):5 - 29.
    Practice relativism is the idea that practices are foundational for bodies of activity and thought, and differ from one another in ways that lead those who constitute the world in terms of them to incommensurable or conflicting conclusions. It is true that practices are not criticizable in any simple way because they are largely tacit and inaccessible. But to make them relativistic one needs an added claim: that practices are "normative", or conceptual in character. It is argued that this is (...)
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  32.  3
    Stephen P. Turner (2003). 3 MacIntyre in the Province of the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. In Mark C. Murphy (ed.), Alasdair Macintyre. Cambridge University Press 70.
  33.  11
    Stephen P. Turner (1984). Durkheim as a Methodologist* Part II-Collective Forces, Causation, and Probability. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):51-71.
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  34. Stephen P. Turner (1985). "Theoretical Logic in Sociology", Volume 1: "Positivism, Presuppositions, and Current Controversies" by Jeffrey C. Alexander. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (1):77.
     
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  35. Stephen P. Turner (1985). "Theoretical Logic in Sociology", Volume 2: "The Antinomies of Classical Thought: Marx and Durkheim" by Jeffrey C. Alexander. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (2):211.
     
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  36.  9
    Stephen P. Turner (1985). Book Review : Theoretical Logic in Sociology, Volume 4: The Modern Reconstruction of Classical Thought: Talcott Parsons. By Jeffrey C. Alexander. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. Pp. XXV + 530. $39.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (4):513-522.
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  37.  7
    Nora K. Bell, Samantha J. Brennan, William F. Bristow, Diana H. Coole, Justin DArms, Michael S. Davis, Daniel A. Dombrowski, John J. P. Donnelly, Anthony J. Ellis, Mark C. Fowler, Alan E. Fuchs, Chris Hackler, Garth L. Hallett, Rita C. Manning, Kevin E. Olson, Lansing R. Pollock, Marc Lee Raphael, Robert A. Sedler, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Kristin S. Schrader‐Frechette, Anita Silvers, Doran Smolkin, Alan G. Soble, James P. Sterba, Stephen P. Turner & Eric Watkins (2001). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (2):446-459.
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  38. Stephen P. Turner (1981). Interpretive Charity, Durkheim, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (2):231.
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  39.  8
    Stephen P. Turner (1979). Translating Ritual Beliefs. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (4):401-423.
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  40.  6
    Stephen P. Turner (1989). Jasso's Principle. Sociological Theory 7 (1):130-134.
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  41.  1
    Stephen P. Turner (1997). Review: Bad Practices: A Reply. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (3):345 - 356.
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  42. Gerard Delanty & Stephen P. Turner (eds.) (2011). Routledge International Handbook of Contemporary Social and Political Theory. Routledge.
  43. Stephen P. Turner (1992). Causality in Sociological ResearchJakub Karpiński. Isis 83 (2):374-375.
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  44. Stephen P. Turner (2009). Can There Be a Pragmatist Philosophy of Social Science? Human Studies 32 (3):365-374.
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  45.  21
    Stephen P. Turner (ed.) (1993). Emile Durkheim: Sociologist and Moralist. Routledge.
    This volume presents an overview of Durkheim's thought and is representative of the best of contemporary Durkheim scholarship.
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  46. Stephen P. Turner (2013). Explaining the Normative. Polity.
    Normativity is what gives reasons their force, makes words meaningful, and makes rules and laws binding. It is present whenever we use such terms as ‘correct,' ‘ought,' ‘must,' and the language of obligation, responsibility, and logical compulsion. Yet normativists, the philosophers committed to this idea, admit that the idea of a non-causal normative realm and a body of normative objects is spooky. Explaining the Normative is the first systematic, historically grounded critique of normativism. It identifies the standard normativist pattern of (...)
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  47. Stephen P. Turner (2010). Explaining the Normative. Polity.
    Normativity is what gives reasons their force, makes words meaningful, and makes rules and laws binding. It is present whenever we use such terms as ‘correct,' ‘ought,' ‘must,' and the language of obligation, responsibility, and logical compulsion. Yet normativists, the philosophers committed to this idea, admit that the idea of a non-causal normative realm and a body of normative objects is spooky. Explaining the Normative is the first systematic, historically grounded critique of normativism. It identifies the standard normativist pattern of (...)
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  48. Stephen P. Turner (2010). Explaining the Normative. Polity.
    Normativity is what gives reasons their force, makes words meaningful, and makes rules and laws binding. It is present whenever we use such terms as ‘correct,' ‘ought,' ‘must,' and the language of obligation, responsibility, and logical compulsion. Yet normativists, the philosophers committed to this idea, admit that the idea of a non-causal normative realm and a body of normative objects is spooky. Explaining the Normative is the first systematic, historically grounded critique of normativism. It identifies the standard normativist pattern of (...)
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  49. Stephen P. Turner (2013). Explaining the Normative. Polity.
    Normativity is what gives reasons their force, makes words meaningful, and makes rules and laws binding. It is present whenever we use such terms as ‘correct,' ‘ought,' ‘must,' and the language of obligation, responsibility, and logical compulsion. Yet normativists, the philosophers committed to this idea, admit that the idea of a non-causal normative realm and a body of normative objects is spooky. Explaining the Normative is the first systematic, historically grounded critique of normativism. It identifies the standard normativist pattern of (...)
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  50. Stephen P. Turner & Paul A. Roth (2003). Introduction. Ghosts and the Machine: Issues of Agency, Rationality, and Scientific Methodology in Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science. In Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub. 1--17.
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