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Profile: Stephen R. Palmquist (Hong Kong Baptist University)
  1. Stephen Palmquist, Kant’s Criticism of Swedenborg: Parapsychology and the Origin of the Copernican Hypothesis.
    Parapsychology, Philosophy and the Mind: A Festschrift in Honour of John Beloff’s 80th Birthday, ed. Fiona Steinkamp (McFarland Press, 2002).
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  2. Stephen Palmquist, And the Kingdom of Myth.
    "Amor fati"—"Love your fate!" "Say 'yes' to life and recognize that you are a 'destiny'." "Languagefalsifiesreality.""TranscendyourmereÂly human nature and become superman!" These are just a few of..
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  3. Stephen Palmquist, Book Review Of: Douglas Burnham: An Introduction to Kant’s Critique of Judgement . Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press Ltd, 2000. X + 198 Pages. [REVIEW]
           As is appropriate for an introductory text, Douglas Burnham’s book opens with a chapter providing general background information on Kant, a systematic overview of the whole Critical philosophy, a sketch of the basic issues dealt with in the third Critique, and an explanation of the overall structure of Kant’s book. Here and throughout Burnham’s book each section ends with a helpful summary, with diagrams and other convenient “lists†being supplied along the way for (...)
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  4. Stephen Palmquist, Glossary of Kant's Technical Terms By.
    The following Glossary lists Kant's most important technical terms, toÂgether with a simple definition of each. (The terms 'judicial', 'perspective' and 'standpoint' are the only ones Kant himself does not use as technical terms.) It was originally written as a study aide to help make the intricate web of Kant's termiÂnology comprehensible to students who had little or no faÂmilÂiarÂiÂty with Kant's writings. Where relevant, the opposite term is given in curved brackets at the end of the definition. When a (...)
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  5. Stephen Palmquist, Two Perspectives on the Object of Knowledge.
    Kant-s use of the word -object- (Objekt or Gegenstand) is a potential source of much confusion and ambiguity. Sometimes he uses it in a broad sense, either nontechnically to refer to an ordinary - thing- encountered in imÂmediate experience, or technically to refer to anything which stands in some potential, actual or necessary relation to the knowing subject. At other times he uses it in a narrower sense to refer to an object in general as it is viewed at one (...)
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  6. Stephen Palmquist, Analysis and Synthesis in the Geometry of Logic.
    The words "analysis" and "synthesis" are among the most widely used and misused terms in the history of philosophy. They were originally used in geometrical reasoning during the age of Euclid to describe two opposing, but complementary, methods of arguing (roughly equivalent to deduction and induction). Since then philosophers have used them not only in this way, but also to refer to distinctions of various sorts between types of judgment or classes of propositions. To some they are regarded as defining (...)
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  7. Stephen Palmquist, A Fresh Perspective on Thought and Action?
    When I was a teenager growing up in the U.S.A., there was a popular little book entitled How To Be A Christian With­out Being Religious . It defined Christianity in terms of a living relationship of faith, arguing that Christians need not adopt any specific thoughts or actions that could be called "religious". Although the book deeply influ­enced me at the time, I have since come to see that it has some serious flaws. While it is true that Christianity is, (...)
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  8. Stephen Palmquist, A Quaker Study on Spiritual Gifts.
    In a recent study of 1 Corinthians 12:7 11, the Hong Kong Monthly Meeting explored how Quakers might interpret Paul’s presentation of nine “spiritual gifts” (or “manifestations” phanerosis in Greek] of God’s spirit). The nine gifts can be neatly grouped into three categories, using Matthew 7:7 (“Ask, and it shall be given to you; seek, and you shall find; knock, and it shall be opened to you”) as a basis: the three “vocal” gifts (the spirit’s manifestation in response to our (...)
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  9. Stephen Palmquist, Critical Comments On Alan Bloom's the Closing of the American Mind ".
    Bloom's now famous manifesto for the salvation of American academia ("Back to the classics!") is worthy of serious consideration. His appraisal of current trends, such as the tendency to move away from theoretical traditions and towards practical or technical degrees, is often penetrating. (A good example is his discussion of the MBA degree: the degree itself is unobjectionable; but the value modern society places on it is a reflection of the "values" of modern society -values which have a destructive side (...)
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  10. Stephen Palmquist, How Is "Christian Tradition" Logically Possible?
    Then some Pharisees and scribes came to Jesus from Jerusalem, saying, "Why do your disciples transgress the tradition of the elders?" .... And he answered and said to them, "And why do you yourselves transgress the commandment of God for the sake of your tradition?" [Matthew 15:1 3].
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  11. Stephen Palmquist, Kant's Critical Hermeneutic of Prayer.
    This essay is a systematic exposition and partial defense of Kant's philosophy of prayer. "Does Kant even HAVE a philosophy of prayer?" you may ask.
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  12. Stephen Palmquist, Kant On Euclid: Geometry in Perspective.
    There is a common assumption among philosophers, shared even by many Kant scholars, that Kant had a naive faith in the absolute valid­ity of Euclidean geometry, Aristotelian logic, and Newtonian physics, and that his primary goal in the Critique of Pure Reason was to pro­vide a rational foundation upon which these classical scientific theories could be based. This, it might be thought, is the essence of his attempt to solve the problem which, as he says in a footnote to the (...)
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  13. Stephen Palmquist, Kantian Redemption: A Critical Challenge to Christian Views of Faith and Works.
    The most common complaints against Kant by religious readers center around various challenges he poses to the way many people practice their religion or conceive of their theological commitments. Thinking Kant is out to destroy their most cherished beliefs, many readers remain unaware that he poses these challenges in the hope of leading us to a religiously healthy way of meeting these very challenges. Here I briefly mention three of Kant’s most important challenges and how he thought religious persons ought (...)
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  14. Stephen Palmquist, Kant, Sexism and the Ethics of Polygamy.
  15. Stephen Palmquist, Meeting the Challenges of Christian Higher Education.
    What does it mean to have a "Christian Higher Education"? Does it mean "getting a degree from a college which calls itself 'Christian'"? I think not. For many gradu­ates of so called "Christian colleges" come away with an education which, in many re­spects, is less authentically Christian than the education they would get at some secular institutions!
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  16. Stephen Palmquist, Studying Religion — Kantian Style.
    This question is relevant not only to stu­dents working towards a degree in religious studies, but to every thinking human being. For a person’s concep­tion of how religion ought to be studied will determine to a large extent that person’s view of the value (or lack of value) of be­ing reli­gious, whether or not that person actually studies religion in depth. I say “to a large extent” because this is only one of two key factors which determine a person’s religious (...)
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  17. Stephen Palmquist, The Creation of Meaning: Epistemological Reflec­Tions on Acts of Initiation.
    How important is the first sentence of an article or book? We all know it is very important, at least when it comes to the level of interest a piece of writing will generate in the reader. A dull, lifeless first paragraph sets a boring tone for the whole piece—a tone that is difficult to change later on, no matter how interesting the topic may be. But why should the first sentence or paragraph be any more signif­icant than the others? (...)
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  18. Stephen Palmquist, Triangulating God: A Kantian Rejoinder to Perovich.
    an ear­lier article [2] in which I argued that the basic principles of Kant's Critical philosophy and of Kant's own application of it to religion and theology are thoroughly consistent with a Christian way of thinking, acting and being. Perovich begins his reply with a fairly accurate summary of my "perspectival" method of interpreting Kant (pp.95 96). Unfortunately, when he describes my pro­posal as to how a perspectival interpretation of Kant can show the Christian philosopher a whole new way of (...)
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  19. Stephen Palmquist, Kant's Theistic Solution to the Problem of Transcendental Theology.
    1. The Problem of Transcendental Theology Kant's transcendental philosophy begins with an attempt to solve the theoretical problem of the possibility of synthetic a priori judgments. In solving this epistemological problem Kant demonstrates how transcendental knowledge (i.e., knowledge of the synthetic a priori conditions for the possibility of experience) is possible only when its application is confined to the realm of empirical knowledge (i.e., to experience). He argues that space, time, and the twelve categories form the transcendental boundary line between (...)
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  20. Stephen R. Palmquist, Poet's Commentary on “Echoes”.
    When composing “Echoes” I set out to express in an artistic form the cognitive dissonance we sometimes feel between the depth of divine Presence in our experience and the often perplexing shallowness of the various “presences” we experience in our daily life. By starting out with a reference to “every time” and “every space”, the first stanza highlights the contrast between these mundane presences and what religious believers might call “God’s Voice”. If the poem has a “primary” message, it is (...)
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  21. Stephen Palmquist & Adriano Palomo, Kant, Buddhism, and the Moral Metaphysics of Medicine.
    "This paper examines Kant's moral theory and compares it with certain key aspects of oriental (especially Buddhist) moral philosophy. In both cases, we focus on the suggestion that there may be a connection between a person's physical health and moral state. Special attention is paid to the nature of pain, illness, and personal happiness and to their mutual interrelationships. A frequently ignored feature of Kant's approach to morality is his preoccupation with health, and his attempt to interpret it in terms (...)
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  22. Stephen R. Palmquist (2013). Kantian Causality and Quantum Quarks: The Compatibility Between Quantum Mechanics and Kant's Phenomenal World. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (77):283-302.
    El indeterminismo cuántico parece incompatible con la defensa de la causalidad que hace Kant en su Segunda Analogía. La interpretación de Copenhague de la mecánica cuántica también considera a esta teoría como evidencia, a favor del antirealismo. Este articulo defiende que la ley (trascendental) de la causalidad se aplica solamente al mundo en tanto que observable, y no a objetos hipotéticos (inobservables) como los quarks, detectables solo mediante aceleradores de altas energías. Tomar la constante de Planck y la velocidad de (...)
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  23. Stephen R. Palmquist & Otterman (2013). The Implied Standpoint of Kant's Religion_: An Assessment of Kant's Reply to (and an English Translation of) an Early Book Review of _Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):73-97.
    In the second edition Preface of Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason Kant responds to an anonymous review of the first edition. We present the first English translation of this obscure book review. Following our translation, we summarize the reviewer's main points and evaluate the adequacy of Kant's replies to five criticisms, including two replies that Kant provides in footnotes added in the second edition. A key issue is the reviewer's claim that Religion adopts an implied standpoint, described using (...)
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  24. Stephen Palmquist (2012). Double Trouble: Kant Trouble: The Obscurities of the Enlightened, Diane Morgan (Routledge)£ 15.99/$24.99 Kant and the Reach of Reason: Studies in Kant's Theory of Rational Systemization, Nicholas Rescher (Cambridge University Press)£ 14.95/$22.95. [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine 15:58.
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  25. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). A Daoist Model for a Kantian Church. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church” (universality, purity, freedom, and unchangeableness). Numerous passages from Lao Z i’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing , seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they (...)
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  26. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). Could Kant's Jesus Be God? International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):421-437.
    Although Kant had a high regard for Jesus as a moral teacher, interpreters typically assume that his philosophy disallows belief in Jesus as God. Those who regard Kant as a moral reductionist are especially likely to offer a negative construal of the densely-argued subsection of his 1793 Religion that relates directly to this issue. The recent “affirmative” trend in Kant-scholarship provides the basis for an alternative reading. First, theologians must regard Jesus as human so that belief in Jesus can empower (...)
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  27. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). Cross-Examination of In Defense of Kant's Religion. Faith and Philosophy 29 (2):170-180.
    This article extends the metaphorical trial posed by the authors of In Defense of Kant’s Religion by cross-examining them with two challenges. The first challenge is for the authors to clarify their claim that they are the first interpreters to present “a holistic and linear interpretation” of Kant’s Religion that portrays it as containing a “transcendental analysis” of religious concepts, given that several of the past interpreters whose works they survey in Part 1 conduct a similar type of analysis. The (...)
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  28. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). Mapping Kant's Architectonic Onto the Yijing Via the Geometry of Logic. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):93-111.
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  29. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). To Tell the Truth on Kant and Christianity. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):340-346.
    After reviewing the history of the “affirmative” approach to interpreting Kant’s Religion, I offer four responses to the symposium papers in the previous issue of Faith and Philosophy. First, incorrectly identifying Kant’s two “experiments” leads to misunderstandings of his affirmation of Christianity. Second, Kant’s Critical Religion expounds a thoroughgoing interpretation of these experiments, and was not primarily an attempt to confirm the architectonic introduced in Kant’s System of Perspectives. Third, the surprise positions defended by most symposium contributors render the “affirmative” (...)
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  30. Stephen R. Palmquist (2011). Architectonic Reasoning and Interpretation in Kant and the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):569-583.
    This is a thoroughly revised version of a paper that I originally presented at the "Kant in Asia" international conference on "The Unity of Human Personhood, held in Hong Kong in May of 2009. After explaining what Kant means by his "architectonic" form of reasoning, I argue that the Yijing (the Chinese "Book of Changes") exhibits the same type of reasoning. I contrast two uses of architectonic reasoning: divining the truth vs. divination. The article concludes with an illustration of how (...)
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  31. Stephen R. Palmquist (2011). Introduction: Levels of Perspectives in Kant and Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):505-508.
    This short essay introduces a set of articles I compiled for a special issue of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy in 2011. Most of the essays are revised versions of papers originally presented at the "Kant in Asia" international conference on "The Unity of Human Personhood", held in Hong Kong in May of 2009, and subsequently published in the collection entitled Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2010). After introducing the papers in the special issue, the (...)
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  32. Stephen Palmquist (2010). The Kantian Grounding of Einstein's Worldview. Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):45-64.
    Recent perspectival interpretations of Kant suggest a way of relating his epistemology to empirical science that makes it plausible to regard Einstein’s theory of relativity as having a Kantian grounding. This first of two articles exploring this topic focuses on how the foregoing hypothesis accounts for various resonances between Kant’s philosophy and Einstein’s science. The great attention young Einstein paid to Kant in his early intellectual development demonstrates the plausibility of this hypothesis, while certain features of Einstein’s cultural-political context account (...)
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  33. Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.) (2010). Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
    Edited by Stephen Palmquist, founder of the Hong Kong Philosophy Café and well known for both his Kant expertise and his devotion to fostering philosophical ...
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  34. Stephen R. Palmquist (2009). Kant's Religious Argument for the Existence of God. Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):3-22.
    After reviewing Kant’s well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of God’s existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a densely-packed theistic argument in Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Humanity’s ultimate moral destiny can be fulfilled only through organized religion, for only by participating in a religious community (or “church”) can we overcome the evil in human nature. Yet we cannot conceive how such a community can even be founded without presupposing God’s existence. (...)
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  35. Stephen R. Palmquist (2009). Toward a Christian Philosophy of Work: A Theological and Religious Extension of Hannah Arendt's Conceptual Framework. Philosophia Christi 11 (2):397.
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  36. Stephen Palmquist (2008). Where Money and Philosophy Mix. The Philosophers' Magazine 41 (41):26-28.
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  37. Stephen Palmquist (2008). Kant's Moral Panentheism. Philosophia 36 (1):17-28.
    Although Kant is often interpreted as an Enlightenment Deist, Kant scholars are increasingly recognizing aspects of his philosophy that are more amenable to theism. If Kant regarded himself as a theist, what kind of theist was he? The theological approach that best fits Kant’s model of God is panentheism, whereby God is viewed as a living being pervading the entire natural world, present ‘in’ every part of nature, yet going beyond the physical world. The purpose of Kant’s restrictions on our (...)
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  38. Stephen Palmquist (2008). Kant's Quasi-Transcendental Argument for a Necessary and Universal Evil Propensity in Human Nature. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):261-297.
    In Part One of Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason, Kant repeatedly refers to a “proof ” that human nature has a necessary and universal “evil propensity,” but he provides only obscure hints at its location. Interpreters have failed to identify such an argument in Part One. After examining relevant passages, summarizing recent attempts to reconstruct the argument, and explaining why these do not meet Kant’s stated needs, I argue that the elusive proof must have atranscendental form (called quasi-transcendental (...)
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  39. Stephen Palmquist (2008). Theocratic Friendship as the Key to Kantian Church Government. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:251-260.
    In Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason, Kant outlines a system of church government that strikes many as an unworkable ideal. The “invisible church” is to be structured according to four basic principles that correspond directly to the categories from the first Critique. Whereas ordinary political systems must involvecoercion, a church is to be a free association of persons governed by non-coercive, internally legislated moral laws. Is this a realistic blueprint for church government? Kant’s metaphor of a “household” as (...)
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  40. Stephen Palmquist (2007). Emergence, Evolution, and the Geometry of Logic: Causal Leaps and the Myth of Historical Development. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 12 (1):9-37.
    After sketching the historical development of “emergence” and noting several recent problems relating to “emergent properties”, this essay proposes that properties may be either “emergent” or “mergent” and either “intrinsic” or “extrinsic”. These two distinctions define four basic types of change: stagnation, permanence, flux, and evolution. To illustrate how emergence can operate in a purely logical system, the Geometry of Logic is introduced. This new method of analyzing conceptual systems involves the mapping of logical relations onto geometrical figures, following either (...)
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  41. Chris L. Firestone & Stephen R. Palmquist (eds.) (2006). Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press.
  42. Stephen Palmquist (2001). Double Trouble. The Philosophers' Magazine 15:58-58.
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  43. Stephen R. Palmquist (2001). Ronald L. Hall, The Human Embrace: The Love of Philosophy and the Philosophy of Love; Kierkegaard, Cavell, Nussbaum Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (1):45-47.
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  44. Stephen Palmquist (2000). The Tree of Philosophy. Philopsychy Press.
    Based on the author's Introduction to Philosophy lectures in Hong Kong, this book has been translated into Chinese and Indonesian and has sold over 10,000 copies. Unlike a typical textbook, the author punctuates his objective descriptions of the classical philosophical theories in metaphysics, logic, applied philosophy and ontology, with highly personal examples of how philosophical reflection can stimulate insights. Like a typical textbook, every chapter ends with a list of questions for further thought and a list of recommended further readings. (...)
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  45. Stephen Palmquist (1998). Philosophers' Views on the Use of Non-Essay Assessment Methods. Teaching Philosophy 21 (4):373-391.
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  46. Stephen Palmquist (1996). How'Chinese'Was Kant? The Philosopher 84 (1):3-9.
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  47. Stephen Palmquist (1994). Triangulating God. Faith and Philosophy 11 (2):302-310.
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  48. Stephen Palmquist (1994). &Quot;the Kingdom of God Is at Hand!&Quot; (Did Kant Really Say That?). History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (4):421 - 437.
    Could Kant have possibly been the author of this quote? Believe it or not, he did write that! What did he mean?
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  49. Stephen Palmquist (1993). The Tree of Philosophy: A Course of Introductory Lectures for Beginning Students of Philosophy. Philopsychy Press.
     
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