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Profile: Stephen Grimm (Fordham University)
  1. Stephen R. Grimm (unknown). The Need for Explanation in the Philosophy of Mind: A Case Study. :237-244.
    Explanatory inquiry characteristically begins with a certain puzzlement about the world. But why do certain situations elicit our puzzlement (or curiosity) while others leave us, in some epistemically relevant sense, cold? Moreover, what exactly is involved in the move from a state of puzzlement to a state where one’s puzzlement is satisfied? In this paper I try to make sense of these questions by focusing on two case studies, one from the popular literature on string theory and one from recent (...)
     
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  2. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij & Stephen R. Grimm (2013). Getting It Right. Philosophical Studies 166 (2):329-347.
    Truth monism is the idea that only true beliefs are of fundamental epistemic value. The present paper considers three objections to truth monism, and argues that, while the truth monist has plausible responses to the first two objections, the third objection suggests that truth monism should be reformulated. On this reformulation, which we refer to as accuracy monism, the fundamental epistemic goal is accuracy, where accuracy is a matter of “getting it right.” The idea then developed is that accuracy is (...)
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  3. Stephen R. Grimm (2011). Review of Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar, Adrian Haddock, The Nature and Value of Knowledge: Three Investigations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  4. Stephen R. Grimm (2010). The Goal of Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):337-344.
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  5. Stephen R. Grimm (2008). Explanatory Inquiry and the Need for Explanation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):481-497.
    Explanatory inquiry characteristically begins with a certain puzzlement about the world. But why do certain situations elicit our puzzlement (or curiosity) while others leave us, in some epistemically relevant sense, cold? Moreover, what exactly is involved in the move from a state of puzzlement to a state where one's puzzlement is satisfied? In this paper I try to answer both of these questions. I also suggest ways in which our account of scientific rationality might benefit from having a better (...)
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  6. Stephen R. Grimm (2008). Epistemic Goals and Epistemic Values. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):725-744.
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  7. Michael R. Depaul & Stephen R. Grimm (2007). Review Essay on Jonathan Kvanvig's the Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):498–514.
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  8. Michael R. Depaul & Stephen R. Grimm (2007). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding by Jonathan Kvanvig. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):498-514.
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  9. Stephen R. Grimm (2007). Easy Cases and Value Incommensurability. Ratio 20 (1):26–44.
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  10. Stephen R. Grimm (2007). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding by Jonathan Kvanvig. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):498-514.
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  11. Stephen R. Grimm (2006). Is Understanding a Species of Knowledge? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (3):515-535.
    Among philosophers of science there seems to be a general consensus that understanding represents a species of knowledge, but virtually every major epistemologist who has thought seriously about understanding has come to deny this claim. Against this prevailing tide in epistemology, I argue that understanding is, in fact, a species of knowledge: just like knowledge, for example, understanding is not transparent and can be Gettiered. I then consider how the psychological act of "grasping" that seems to be characteristic of understanding (...)
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  12. Stephen R. Grimm (2006). The Need for Explanation in the Philosophy of Mind. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:237-244.
    Explanatory inquiry characteristically begins with a certain puzzlement about the world. But why do certain situations elicit our puzzlement (or curiosity) while others leave us, in some epistemically relevant sense, cold? Moreover, what exactly is involved in the move from a state of puzzlement to a state where one’s puzzlement is satisfied? In this paper I try to make sense of these questions by focusing on two case studies, one from the popular literature on string theory and one from recent (...)
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  13. Stephen R. Grimm (2004). Value Incommensurability. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:221-232.
    In this paper I consider the challenge to rational choice posed by the problem of value incommensurability, and argue that incommensurabilists misrepresentour position as practical reasoners. In essence, I claim that reason has considerably more to work with than their arguments suggest, and that as a result it is possible for us to compare even the deepest values. To say that it is possible for us to compare values is not to say that it is always easy, however, or that (...)
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  14. Stephen R. Grimm (2003). Varieties of Religion Today. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):120-122.
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  15. Stephen R. Grimm (2002). Kant's Argument for Radical Evil. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160–177.
  16. Stephen R. Grimm (2001). A Catholic Modernity? International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):247-249.
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  17. Stephen R. Grimm (2001). Cardinal Newman, Reformed Epistemologist? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (4):497-522.
    Despite the recent claims of some prominent Catholic philosophers, I argue that Cardinal Newman's writings are in fact largely compatible with the contemporary movement in the philosophy of religion known as Reformed Epistemology, and in particular with the work of Alvin Plantinga. I first show how the thought of both Newman and Plantinga was molded in response to the "evidentialist" claims of John Locke. I then examine the details of Newman's response, especially as seen in his Essay in Aid of (...)
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  18. Stephen R. Grimm (2000). Jacquette, Dale. Wittgenstein's Thought in Transition. Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):708-710.
  19. Stephen R. Grimm (2000). The Augustinian Tradition. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (3):392-394.
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  20. Stephen R. Grimm (1999). Hume. Two Volumes. Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):936-938.
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  21. Stephen R. Grimm (1998). The Continuity of Wittgenstein's Thought. Review of Metaphysics 51 (4):939-939.