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  1. Stephen R. Schiffer, An Introduction to Content and its Role in Explanation.
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  2. Stephen R. Schiffer, Mental Content and Epistemic Two-Dimensional Semantics.
    David’s epistemic understanding of two-dimensional semantics has these two features. First, although he considers at least two construals of epistemically possible worlds, on one of them they are centered metaphysically possible worlds. Second, David intends epistemic two-dimensional semantics to yield a theory of propositional-attitude content, as well as having application to the semantics of natural language expressions. These two features come together in David’s “The Components of Content,” where he deploys the apparatus of epistemic two-dimensional semantics to provide an account (...)
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  3. Stephen R. Schiffer (2006). A Problem for a Direct-Reference Theory of Belief Reports. Noûs 40 (2):361-368.
    (1) The propositions we believe and say are _Russellian_ _propositions_: structured propositions whose basic components are the objects and properties our thoughts and speech acts are about. (2) Many singular terms.
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  4. Stephen R. Schiffer (2006). Propositional Content. In Ernest LePore & B. Smith (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oup Oxford.
    To a first approximation, _propositional content_ is whatever _that-clauses_ contribute to what is ascribed in utterances of sentences such as Ralph believes _that Tony Curtis is alive_. Ralph said _that Tony Curtis is alive_. Ralph hopes _that Tony Curtis is alive_. Ralph desires _that Tony Curtis is alive_.
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  5. Stephen R. Schiffer (2003). Two-Dimensional Semantics and Propositional Attitude Content. In The Things We Mean. Oxford University Press.
  6. Stephen R. Schiffer (2003). The Things We Mean. Oxford University Press.
    Stephen Schiffer presents a groundbreaking account of meaning and belief, and shows how it can illuminate a range of crucial problems regarding language, mind, knowledge, and ontology. He introduces the new doctrine of 'pleonastic propositions' to explain what the things we mean and believe are. He discusses the relation between semantic and psychological facts, on the one hand, and physical facts, on the other; vagueness and indeterminacy; moral truth; conditionals; and the role of propositional content in information acquisition and explanation. (...)
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  7. Stephen R. Schiffer (1998). Doubts About Implicit Conceptions. Philosophical Issues 9:89-91.
  8. Stephen R. Schiffer (1998). Meanings and Concepts. Lingua E Stile 33 (3):399-411.
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  9. Stephen R. Schiffer (1994). A Paradox of Meaning. Noûs 28 (3):279-324.
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  10. Stephen R. Schiffer (1994). The Language-of-Thought Relation and its Implications. Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):263-85.
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  11. Stephen R. Schiffer (1992). Boghossian on Externalism and Inference. Philosophical Issues 2:29-38.
    Suppose we think in a language of thought. Then Paul Boghossian' is prepared to argue, first, that there may be ambiguous Mentalese expression types that have unambiguous tokens, and, second, that the way in which this is possible allows for otherwise valid theoretical or practical reasoning to be rendered invalid owing to equivocation of a sort that may be undetectable to the reasoner. Paul sees this as a possible basis from which to launch an argument for what some might call (...)
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  12. Stephen R. Schiffer (1991). Ceteris Paribus Laws. Mind 100 (397):1-17.
  13. Stephen R. Schiffer (1991). Does Mentalese Have a Compositional Semantics? In Barry M. Loewer & Georges Rey (eds.), Meaning in Mind: Fodor and His Critics. Blackwell.
     
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  14. Stephen R. Schiffer (1990). Fodor's Character. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Information, Semantics, and Epistemology. Blackwell.
     
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  15. Stephen R. Schiffer (1990). Physicalism. Philosophical Perspectives 4:153-185.
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  16. Stephen R. Schiffer (1987). Intentionality and the Language of Thought. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 87:35-55.
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  17. Stephen R. Schiffer (1987). Remnants of Meaning. MIT Press.
     
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  18. Stephen R. Schiffer (1986). Comments on Peacocke's Explanation in Computational Psychology. Mind and Language 1:362-371.
  19. Stephen R. Schiffer (1986). Functionalism and Belief. In Myles Brand & Robert M. Harnish (eds.), The Representation of Knowledge and Belief. University of Arizona Press.
     
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  20. Stephen R. Schiffer (1986). Kripkenstein Meets the Remnants of Meaning. Philosophical Studies 49 (March):147-162.
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  21. Stephen R. Schiffer (1986). Stalnaker's Problem of Intentionality: On Robert Stalnaker's Inquiry. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 67 (April):87-97.
     
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  22. Stephen R. Schiffer (1981). Truth and the Theory of Content. In Herman Parret (ed.), Meaning and Understanding. Berlin.
     
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  23. Stephen R. Schiffer (1972). Meaning. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
    What is it for marks or sounds to have meaning, and what is it for someone to mean something in producing them? Answering these and related questions, Schiffer explores communication, speech acts, convention, and the meaning of linguistic items in this reissue of a seminal work on the foundations of meaning. A new introduction takes account of recent developments and places his theory in a broader context.
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