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Stephen Read [79]Stephen J. Read [3]
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Profile: Stephen Read (University of St. Andrews)
  1. Stephen Read (forthcoming). Medieval Theories: Properties of Terms. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Stephen Read (2013). Technology as In-Between. Foundations of Science 18 (1):195-200.
    This commentary on Søren Riis’s paper “Dwelling in-between walls” starts from a position of solidarity with its attempt to build a postphenomenological perspective on architecture and the built environment. It proposes however that a clearer view of a technological structure of experience may be obtained by finding technological-perceptual wholes that incorporate perceiver and perceived as well as the mediating apparatus. Parts and wholes may be formed as nested human-technological interiorities that have structured relations with what is outside—so that the outside (...)
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  3. Stephen Read (2012). John Buridan's Theory of Consequence and His Octagons of Opposition. In J.-Y. Beziau & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Around and Beyond the Square of Opposition. Birkhäuser. 93--110.
    One of the manuscripts of Buridan’s Summulae contains three figures, each in the form of an octagon. At each node of each octagon there are nine propositions. Buridan uses the figures to illustrate his doctrine of the syllogism, revising Aristotle's theory of the modal syllogism and adding theories of syllogisms with propositions containing oblique terms (such as ‘man’s donkey’) and with ‘propositions of non-normal construction’ (where the predicate precedes the copula). O-propositions of non-normal construction (i.e., ‘Some S (some) P is (...)
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  4. Stephen Read (2012). The Medieval Theory of Consequence. Synthese 187 (3):899-912.
    The recovery of Aristotle’s logic during the twelfth century was a great stimulus to medieval thinkers. Among their own theories developed to explain Aristotle’s theories of valid and invalid reasoning was a theory of consequence, of what arguments were valid, and why. By the fourteenth century, two main lines of thought had developed, one at Oxford, the other at Paris. Both schools distinguished formal from material consequence, but in very different ways. In Buridan and his followers in Paris, formal consequence (...)
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  5. Amirouche Moktefi & Stephen Read (2011). Preface. Philosophia Scientiae 15:1-5.
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  6. Stephen Read (2011). Best Paper Award. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (3).
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  7. Stephen Read (2011). Miller, Bradwardine and the Truth. Discusiones Filosóficas 12 (18):229-35.
    In his article "Verdades antiguas y modernas" (in the same issue, pp. 207-27), David Miller criticised Thomas Bradwardine’s theory of truth and signification and my defence of Bradwardine’s application of it to the semantic paradoxes. Much of Miller’s criticism is sympathetic and helpful in gaining a better understanding of the relationship between Bradwardine’s proposed solution to the paradoxes and Alfred Tarski’s. But some of Miller’s criticisms betray a misunderstanding of crucial aspects of Bradwardine’s account of truth and signification.
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  8. Wilfrid Hodges & Stephen Read (2010). Western Logic. Journal of the Indian Council for Philosophical Research 27 (1):13-45.
    The editors invited us to write a short paper that draws together the main themes of logic in the Western tradition from the Classical Greeks to the modern period. To make it short we had to make it personal. We set out the themes that seemed to us either the deepest, or the most likely to be helpful for an Indian reader.
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  9. Stephen Read (2010). Field's Paradox and Its Medieval Solution. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (2):161-176.
    Hartry Field's revised logic for the theory of truth in his new book, Saving Truth from Paradox , seeking to preserve Tarski's T-scheme, does not admit a full theory of negation. In response, Crispin Wright proposed that the negation of a proposition is the proposition saying that some proposition inconsistent with the first is true. For this to work, we have to show that this proposition is entailed by any proposition incompatible with the first, that is, that it is the (...)
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  10. Stephen Read (2010). General-Elimination Harmony and the Meaning of the Logical Constants. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (5):557-76.
    Inferentialism claims that expressions are meaningful by virtue of rules governing their use. In particular, logical expressions are autonomous if given meaning by their introduction-rules, rules specifying the grounds for assertion of propositions containing them. If the elimination-rules do no more, and no less, than is justified by the introduction-rules, the rules satisfy what Prawitz, following Lorenzen, called an inversion principle. This connection between rules leads to a general form of elimination-rule, and when the rules have this form, they may (...)
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  11. Stephen Read (2010). The Liar and the New T-Schema. Discusiones Filosóficas 11 (17):119-137.
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  12. Stephen Read (2010). Necessary Truth and Proof. Kriterion 51 (121):47-67.
    What makes necessary truths true? I argue that all truth supervenes on how things are, and that necessary truths are no exception. What makes them true are proofs. But if so, the notion of proof needs to be generalized to include verification-transcendent proofs, proofs whose correctness exceeds our ability to verify it. It is incumbent on me, therefore, to show that arguments, such as Dummett's, that verification-truth is not compatible with the theory of meaning, are mistaken. The answer is that (...)
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  13. Andrew Aberdein & Stephen Read (2009). The Philosophy of Alternative Logics. In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press. 613-723.
    This chapter focuses on alternative logics. It discusses a hierarchy of logical reform. It presents case studies that illustrate particular aspects of the logical revisionism discussed in the chapter. The first case study is of intuitionistic logic. The second case study turns to quantum logic, a system proposed on empirical grounds as a resolution of the antinomies of quantum mechanics. The third case study is concerned with systems of relevance logic, which have been the subject of an especially detailed reform (...)
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  14. Stephen Read (2009). Plural Signification and the Liar Paradox. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):363 - 375.
    In recent years, speech-act theory has mooted the possibility that one utterance can signify a number of different things. This pluralist conception of signification lies at the heart of Thomas Bradwardine’s solution to the insolubles, logical puzzles such as the semantic paradoxes, presented in Oxford in the early 1320s. His leading assumption was that signification is closed under consequence, that is, that a proposition signifies everything which follows from what it signifies. Then any proposition signifying its own falsity, he showed, (...)
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  15. Catarina Dutilh Novaes & Stephen Read (2008). Insolubilia and the Fallacy Secundum Quid Et Simpliciter. Vivarium 46 (2):175-191.
    Thomas Bradwardine makes much of the fact that his solution to the insolubles is in accordance with Aristotle's diagnosis of the fallacy in the Liar paradox as that of secundum quid et simpliciter. Paul Spade, however, claims that this invocation of Aristotle by Bradwardine is purely "honorary" in order to confer specious respectability on his analysis and give it a spurious weight of authority. Our answer to Spade follows Bradwardine's response to the problem of revenge: any proposition saying of itself (...)
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  16. Stephen Read (2007). Bradwardine's Revenge. In J. C. Beall (ed.), Revenge of the Liar: New Essays on the Paradox. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17. Stephen Read (2007). Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum (review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):157-158.
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  18. Stephen Read (2007). William of Ockham's the Sum of Logic. Topoi 26 (2):271-277.
  19. Stephen Read (2006). Monism: The One True Logic. In D. de Vidi & T. Kenyon (eds.), A Logical Approach to Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Graham Solomon. Springer.
    Logical pluralism is the claim that different accounts of validity can be equally correct. Beall and Restall have recently defended this position. Validity is a matter of truth-preservation over cases, they say: the conclusion should be true in every case in which the premises are true. Each logic specifies a class of cases, but differs over which cases should be considered. I show that this account of logic is incoherent. Validity indeed is truth-preservation, provided this is properly understood. Once understood, (...)
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  20. Stephen Read (2006). Review of J.C.Beall, Greg Restall, Logical Pluralism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).
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  21. Stephen Read (2006). Symmetry and Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (4):307-318.
    The ?no???no? paradox (so-called by Sorensen) consists of a pair of propositions each of which says of the other that it is false. It is not immediately paradoxical, since it has a solution in which one proposition is true, the other false. However, that is itself paradoxical, since there is no clear ground for determining which is which. The two propositions should have the same truth-value. The paper shows how a proposal by the medieval thinker Thomas Bradwardine solves not only (...)
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  22. Stephen Read (2005). The Unity of the Fact. Philosophy 80 (3):317-342.
    What binds the constituents of a state of affairs together and provides unity to the fact they constitute? I argue that the fact that they are related is basic and fundamental. This is the thesis of Factualism: the world is a world of facts. I draw three corollaries: first, that the Identity of truth is mistaken, in conflating what represents (the proposition) with what is represented (the fact). Secondly, a popular interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus, due to Steinus, whereby false propositions (...)
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  23. Stephen J. Read & Lynn C. Miller (2005). Explanatory Coherence and Goal-Based Knowledge Structures in Making Dispositional Inferences. In B. Malle & S. Hodges (eds.), Other Minds. Guilford Press. 124--139.
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  24. Graham Priest & Stephen Read (2004). Intentionality: Meinongianism and the Medievals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):421 – 442.
    Intentional verbs create three different problems: problems of non-existence, of indeterminacy, and of failure of substitutivity. Meinongians tackle the first problem by recognizing non-existent objects; so too did many medieval logicians. Meinongians and the medievals approach the problem of indeterminacy differently, the former diagnosing an ellipsis for a propositional complement, the latter applying their theory directly to non-propositional complements. The evidence seems to favour the Meinongian approach. Faced with the third problem, Ockham argued bluntly for substitutivity when the intentional complement (...)
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  25. Stephen Read (2004). Identity and Harmony. Analysis 64 (2):113–119.
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  26. Stephen Read (2004). In Defence of the Dog: Response to Restall. In. In S. Rahman J. Symons (ed.), Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science. Kluwer Academic Publisher. 175--180.
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  27. John Haldane & Stephen Read (2003). The Philosophy of Thomas Reid: A Collection of Essays.
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  28. Stephen Read (2003). Freeing Assumptions From the Liar Paradox. Analysis 63 (2):162–166.
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  29. Stephen Read (2003). Logical Consequences as Truth-Preservation. Logique and Analyse 183 (4):479-493.
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  30. Stephen Read (2002). The Liar Paradox From John Buridan Back to Thomas Bradwardine. Vivarium 40 (2):189-218.
  31. Michael Astroh, Ivor Grattan-Guinness & Stephen Read (2001). A Survey of the Life of Hugh MacColl (1837-1909). History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (2):81-98.
    The Scottish logician Hugh MacColl is well known for his innovative contributions to modal and nonclassical logics. However, until now little biographical information has been available about his academic and cultural background, his personal and professional situation, and his position in the scientific community of the Victorian era. The present article reports on a number of recent findings.
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  32. Egbert P. Bos & Stephen Read (eds.) (2001). Concepts: The Treatises of Thomas of Cleves and Paul of Gelria : An Edition of the Texts With a Systematic Introduction. Peeters Pub & Booksellers.
    These are two of only three medieval treatises known to the editors explicitly devoted to discussion of concepts. That is not to deny that other works treat extensively of concepts among other matters.
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  33. Stephen Read (2000). Harmony and Autonomy in Classical Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (2):123-154.
    Michael Dummett and Dag Prawitz have argued that a constructivist theory of meaning depends on explicating the meaning of logical constants in terms of the theory of valid inference, imposing a constraint of harmony on acceptable connectives. They argue further that classical logic, in particular, classical negation, breaks these constraints, so that classical negation, if a cogent notion at all, has a meaning going beyond what can be exhibited in its inferential use. I argue that Dummett gives a mistaken elaboration (...)
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  34. Stephen Read (2000). Truthmakers and the Disjunction Thesis. Mind 109 (433):67-79.
    The correspondence theory of truth has experienced something of a revival recently in the form of the Truthmaker Axiom: whatever is true, something makes it true. We consider various postulates which have been proposed to characterize truthmaking, in particular, the Disjunction Thesis (DT), that whatever makes a disjunction true must make one or other disjunct true. In conjunction with certain other assumptions, DT leads to triviality. We show that there are elaborations of truthmaking on which DT holds (which must therefore (...)
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  35. Stephen Read (1999). Concepts and Meaning in Medieval Philosophy. Philosophy and Theology 8:1-20.
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  36. Stephen Read (1999). Sheffer's Stroke: A Study in Proof-Theoretic Harmony. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 34:7-23.
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  37. Stephen Read (1999). How Is Material Supposition Possible? Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):1-20.
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  38. Stephen Read (1998). Hugh MacColl and the Algebra of Strict Implication. Nordic Journal of Philosophical Logic 3:59-84.
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  39. Stephen Read (1997). Quotation and Reach's Puzzle. Acta Analytica 19:9--20.
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  40. Stephen Read (1997). Completeness and Categoricity: Frege, Gödel and Model Theory. History and Philosophy of Logic 18 (2):79-93.
    Frege?s project has been characterized as an attempt to formulate a complete system of logic adequate to characterize mathematical theories such as arithmetic and set theory. As such, it was seen to fail by Gödel?s incompleteness theorem of 1931. It is argued, however, that this is to impose a later interpretation on the word ?complete? it is clear from Dedekind?s writings that at least as good as interpretation of completeness is categoricity. Whereas few interesting first-order mathematical theories are categorical or (...)
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  41. Stephen Read (1995). Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages. Philosophical Books 36 (2):102-104.
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  42. Stephen Read & Dorothy Edgington (1995). Conditionals and the Ramsey Test. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 69:47 - 86.
  43. Stephen Read (1994). Formal and Material Consequence. Journal of Philosophical Logic 23 (3):247 - 265.
  44. Stephen Read (1994). Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen Read sets out to rescue logic from its undeserved reputation as an inflexible, dogmatic discipline by demonstrating that its technicalities and processes are founded on assumptions which are themselves amenable to philosophical investigation. He examines the fundamental principles of consequence, logical truth and correct inference within the context of logic, and shows that the principles by which we delineate consequences are themselves not guaranteed free from error. Central to the notion of truth is the beguiling issue (...)
     
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  45. J. J. H. & Stephen Read (1993). Sophisms in Medieval Logic and Grammar. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):580.
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  46. Stephen Read (1993). The Bounds of Logic. A Generalized Viewpoint. Philosophical Books 34 (3):158-160.
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  47. Stephen Read (1993). The Slingshot Argument. Logique Et Analyse 36:195-218.
     
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  48. Stephen Read (1992). Conditionals Are Not Truth-Functional: An Argument From Peirce. Analysis 52 (1):5 - 12.
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  49. Stephen Read (1991). Thomas of Cleves and Collective Supposition. Vivarium 29 (1):50-84.
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  50. Stephen J. Read, Lynn C. Miller & David K. Jones (1990). Goals in the Conceptual Coherence of Social Categories. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (3):261-267.
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