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  1. Stephen S. Bush (2013). Horribly Wrong. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):585-600.
    Moral horror is an extreme emotional response to that which violates things we regard as sacred. In Robert Merrihew Adams's view, horror is a response to badness and not to wrongness, and so one could properly regard some actions as horrible but not wrong. In contrast, I argue that horror, when directed toward actions, is only appropriate for wrong actions. The reason is that horror involves moral disgust, and agents who committed a horrible action would have self-disgust, that is, they (...)
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  2. Kent L. Brintnall & Stephen S. Bush (2012). Letters, Notes, & Comments. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):545 - 555.
    This Comment argues that Stephen Bush's critique of Georges Bataille's meditative practice fails to recognize how the disruption of the self, and the challenge to goal-oriented activity that comprise the heart of that practice, serve as an ethical limit that protects against sadistic and violent engagement with the world. The ethical disposition fostered by Bataille's practice is a dissolution of the self. In this reply to Kent Brintnall's response to my essay on Georges Bataille and the ethics of ecstasy, I (...)
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  3. Stephen S. Bush (2012). Concepts and Religious Experiences: Wayne Proudfoot on the Cultural Construction of Experiences. Religious Studies 48 (1):101 - 117.
    The constructivist position, that mystical experiences are determined by the experiencer's cultural context, is now more prevalent among scholars of religion than the perennialist position, which maintains that mystical experiences have a common core that is cross-culturally universal. In large part, this is due to the efforts of Wayne Proudfoot in his widely accepted book, Religious Experience.In this article, I identify some significant unresolved issues in Proudfoot's defence of constructivism. My aim is not to defend perennialism, but to specify some (...)
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  4. Stephen S. Bush (2012). Georges Bataille's Mystical Cruelty. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):551-555.
    In this reply to Kent Brintnall's response to my essay on Georges Bataille and the ethics of ecstasy, I explore two primary questions: whether instrumentalization is inherently violent and non-instrumentalization is inherently non-violent, and whether there is a way to intervene in the world that avoids both “apathetic disengagement” and domination. I endorse the view that instrumentalization can be good as well as bad, and I suggest that it is possible to strive to intervene in the world without striving to (...)
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  5. Stephen S. Bush (2012). G. Scott Davis: Believing and Acting: The Pragmatic Turn in Comparative Religion and Ethics. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (3):243-247.
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  6. Stephen S. Bush (2011). The Ethics of Ecstasy: Georges Bataille and Amy Hollywood on Mysticism, Morality, and Violence. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):299-320.
    Georges Bataille agrees with numerous Christian mystics that there is ethical and religious value in meditating upon, and having ecstatic episodes in response to, imagery of violent death. For Christians, the crucified Christ is the focus of contemplative efforts. Bataille employs photographic imagery of a more-recent victim of torture and execution. In this essay, while engaging with Amy Hollywood's interpretation of Bataille in Sensible Ecstasy, I show that, unlike the Christian mystics who influence him, Bataille strives to divorce himself from (...)
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  7. Stephen S. Bush (2010). The Uses of Paradox. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):240-243.
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  8. Stephen S. Bush (2009). Nothing Outside the Text: Derrida and Brandom on Language and World. Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (2):45-69.
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  9. Stephen S. Bush (2008). Divine and Human Happiness in Nicomachean Ethics. Philosophical Review 117 (1):49-75.
    presents a puzzle as to whether Aristotle views morally virtuous activity as happiness, as book 1 seems to indicate, or philosophical contemplation as happiness, as book 10 seems to indicate. The most influential attempts to resolve this issue have been either monistic or inclusivist. According to the monists, happiness consists exclusively of contemplation. According to the inclusivists, contemplation is one constituent of happiness, but morally virtuous activity is another. In this essay I will examine influential defenses of monism. Finding these (...)
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