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Profile: Stephen Wilkinson (Lancaster University)
  1. Stephen Wilkinson (forthcoming). Selective Reproduction, Eugenics, and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  2. Stephen Wilkinson (2015). Exploitation in International Paid Surrogacy Arrangements. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Many critics have suggested that international paid surrogacy is exploitative. Taking such concerns as its starting point, this article asks: how defensible is the claim that international paid surrogacy is exploitative and what could be done to make it less exploitative? In the light of the answer to, how strong is the case for prohibiting it? Exploitation could in principle be dealt with by improving surrogates' pay and conditions. However, doing so may exacerbate problems with consent. Foremost amongst these is (...)
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  3. Stephen Wilkinson (2015). Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health. Bioethics 29 (1):26-35.
    One widely held view of prenatal screening is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, (...)
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  4. Sheelagh Mcguinness, Tom Walker & Stephen Wilkinson (2013). Guest Editorial. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (01):4-7.
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  5. Sheelagh Mcguinness, Tom Walker & Stephen Wilkinson (2013). Guest Editorial - A Complex Web of Questions. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):4-7.
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  6. Stephen Wilkinson (2010). Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction. OUP Oxford.
    To what extent should parents be allowed to use reproductive technologies to determine the characteristics of their future children? Is there something morally wrong with choosing what their sex will be, or with trying to 'screen out' as much disease and disability as possible before birth? Stephen Wilkinson offers answers to such questions.
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  7. Stephen Wilkinson (2010). On the Distinction Between Positive and Negative Eugenics. In Matti Häyry (ed.), Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi
     
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  8. Stephen Wilkinson (2007). Eugenics and the Criticism of Bioethics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):409 - 418.
    This article provides a critical assessment of some aspects of Ann Kerr and Tom Shakespeare's Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome. In particular, I evaluate their claims: (a) that bioethics is too ‘top down’, involving normative prescriptions, whereas it should instead be ‘bottom up’ and grounded in social science; and (b) that contemporary bioethics has not dealt particularly well with people's moral concerns about eugenics. I conclude that several of Kerr and Shakespeare's criticisms are well-founded and serve as valuable reminders (...)
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  9. Stephen Wilkinson (2007). Review: Eugenics and the Criticism of Bioethics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):409 - 418.
    This article provides a critical assessment of some aspects of Ann Kerr and Tom Shakespeare's Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome. In particular, I evaluate their claims: (a) that bioethics is too ‘top down’, involving normative prescriptions, whereas it should instead be ‘bottom up’ and grounded in social science; and (b) that contemporary bioethics has not dealt particularly well with people's moral concerns about eugenics. I conclude that several of Kerr and Shakespeare's criticisms are well-founded and serve as valuable reminders (...)
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  10. Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London (2006). Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
     
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  11. Eve Garrard & Stephen Wilkinson (2006). Selecting Disability and the Welfare of the Child. The Monist 89 (4):482-504.
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  12. Stephen Wilkinson (2006). Eugenics, Embryo Selection, and the Equal Value Principle. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):46-51.
    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and some prenatal screening programmes have been criticized for being 'eugenic'. This paper aims to analyse this criticism and to evaluate one of the main ethical arguments lying behind it. It starts with a discussion of the meaning of the term 'eugenics' and of some relevant distinctions: for example, that between objections to eugenic ends and objections to certain means of achieving them. Next, a particular argument against using preimplantation genetic diagnosis to 'screen out' disability is considered, (...)
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  13. Stephen Wilkinson (2006). Selecting Disability and the Welfare of the Child. The Monist 89 (4):482-504.
  14. Stephen Wilkinson (2005). Biomedical Research and the Commercial Exploitation of Human Tissue. Genomics, Society and Policy 1:27-40.
     
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  15. Stephen Wilkinson (2005). Designer Babies', Instrumentalisation and the Child's Right to an Open Future. In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  16. Stephen Wilkinson (2005). Separating Conjoined Twins: The Case of Laden and Laleh Bijani. In Jennifer Gunning & Søren Holm (eds.), Ethics, Law, and Society. Ashgate 1--257.
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  17. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade. Routledge.
    Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether such arguments stand up, and whether legislation outlawing ...
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  18. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). Book Review: Sue Eckstein, Manual for Research Ethics Committees (Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, King's College London). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):459-460.
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  19. Stephen Wilkinson (2003). The Exploitation Argument Against Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 17 (2):169–187.
    It is argued that there are good reasons for believing that commercial surrogacy is often exploitative. However, even if we accept this, the exploitation argument for prohibiting (or otherwise legislatively discouraging) commercial surrogacy remains quite weak. One reason for this is that prohibition may well 'backfire' and lead to potential surrogates having to do other things that are more exploitative and/or more harmful than paid surrogacy. It is concluded, therefore, that those who oppose exploitation should concentrate on: (a) improving the (...)
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  20. Stephen Wilkinson (2001). Rationing Health Care: Individuals and the Broader Public. Philosophy Today 14 (36):10-11.
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  21. Stephen Wilkinson (2000). Commodification Arguments for the Legal Prohibition of Organ Sale. Health Care Analysis 8 (2):189-201.
    The commercial trading of human organs, along withvarious related activities (for example, advertising)was criminalised throughout Great Britain under theHuman Organ Transplants Act 1989.This paper critically assesses one type of argumentfor this, and similar, legal prohibitions:commodification arguments.Firstly, the term `commodification' is analysed. Thiscan be used to refer to either social practices or toattitudes. Commodification arguments rely on thesecond sense and are based on the idea that having acommodifying attitude to certain classes of thing(e.g. bodies or persons) is wrong. The commodifyingattitude consists (...)
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  22. Stephen Wilkinson (2000). Why Lying is Worse Than Merely Misleading. Philosophy Today 13 (34):6-7.
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  23. Stephen Wilkinson (1999). Smokers' Rights to Health Care: Why the 'Restoration Argument' is a Moralising Wolf in a Liberal Sheep's Clothing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (3):255–269.
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  24. Stephen Wilkinson (1999). Using Some “New” Political Ideas: Feminism and “Green Ideology”. Res Publica 5 (1):103-108.
  25. Sally Sheldon & Stephen Wilkinson (1998). Female Genital Mutilation and Cosmetic Surgery: Regulating Non-Therapeutic Body Modification. Bioethics 12 (4):263–285.