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  1. Stephen Wilmot (forthcoming). First Nations Health Care and the Canadian Covenant. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-9.
    In this paper I explore the relationship between the Canadian state and Canada’s First Nations, in the context of the Canadian health care system. I argue that Canada’s provision of health care to its citizens can be best understood morally in terms of a covenant, but that the covenant fails to meet the needs of indigenous peoples. I consider three ways of changing the relationship and obligations linking Canada’s First Nations and the Canadian state, with regard to health care- assimilation, (...)
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  2. Stephen Wilmot (2012). Social Justice and the Canadian Nurses Association: Justifying Equity. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):15-26.
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  3. Stephen Wilmot (2011). Evidence, Ethics and Inclusion: A Broader Base for NICE. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):111-121.
    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (hereafter NICE) was created in 1998 to give guidance on which treatments should be provided by the British National Health Service, and to whom. So it has a crucial role as an agent of distributive justice. In this paper I argue that it is failing to adequately explain and justify its decisions in the public arena, particularly in terms of distributive justice; and that this weakens its legitimacy, to the detriment of the (...)
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  4. Stephen Wilmot (2010). Health Professionals: How Much Employee Loyalty Should We Expect in a Privatising System? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (1):1-16.
    In recent years UK government policy has been drawing private companies into the operation of the British National Health Service as providers of health care. Hitherto the National Health Service has been the main employer of health care practitioners, but this may change as a result of this development. There is an issue as to whether professional health care practitioners owe the same moral commitment to an employer in the private sector as they would owe to an employer that is (...)
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  5. Stephen Wilmot (2009). Psychotherapy and Distributive Justice: A Rawlsian Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):67-75.
    In this paper I outline an approach to the distribution of resources between psychotherapy modalities in the context of the UK’s health care system, using recent discussions of Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy as a way of highlighting resourcing issues. My main goal is to offer an approach that is just, and that accommodates the diversity of different schools of psychotherapy. In order to do this I draw extensively on the theories of Justice and of Political Liberalism developed by the late John (...)
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  6. Stephen Wilmot (2007). A Fair Range of Choice: Justifying Maximum Patient Choice in the British National Health Service. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (2):59-72.
    In this paper I put forward an ethical argument for the provision of extensive patient choice by the British National Health Service. I base this argument on traditional liberal rights to freedom of choice, on a welfare right to health care, and on a view of health as values-based. I argue that choice, to be ethically sustainable on this basis, must be values-based and rational. I also consider whether the British taxpayer may be persuadable with regard to the moral acceptability (...)
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  7. Stephen Wilmot (2004). Foundation Trusts and the Problem of Legitimacy. Health Care Analysis 12 (2):157-169.
    The UK government is setting up a new kind of organisation as part of the National Health Service, the foundation trust. Foundation trusts will be more distanced from government than existing NHS bodies, and will have closer community links. In this paper I identify the importance of legitimacy in health care and explore the potential situation of foundation trusts in terms of the bases of their legitimacy as organisations. Relationships with community, stakeholders and government are all considered as sources of (...)
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  8. Stephen Wilmot, Lesley Legg & Janice Barratt (2002). Ethical Issues in the Feeding of Patients Suffering From Dementia: A Focus Group Study of Hospital Staff Responses to Conflicting Principles. Nursing Ethics 9 (6):599-611.
    Feeding difficulties in older patients who are suffering from dementia present problems with balancing conflicting ethical principles. They have been considered by several writers in recent years, and the views of nursing and care staff have been studied in different contexts. The present study used focus groups to explore the way in which nursing and care staff in a National Health Service trust deal with conflict between ethical principles in this area. Three focus groups were convened, one each from the (...)
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  9. Slamet S. Sarwono, Robert W. Armstrong, Taiwanese Versus U. S. Sales People, Stephen Wilmot & What Can We Infer From Our (2001). Special Issue on International Management. Journal of Business Ethics 30:405-406.
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  10. Stephen Wilmot (2001). Corporate Moral Responsibility: What Can We Infer From Our Understanding of Organisations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):161 - 169.
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – whether corporate bodies can be held morally responsible for their actions – has been debated by a number of writers since the 1970s. This discussion is intended to add to that debate, and focuses for that purpose on our understanding of the organisation. Though the integrity of the organisation has been called into question by the postmodern view of organisations, that view does not necessarily rule out the attribution of corporate agency, any more (...)
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  11. Stephen Wilmot (2000). Corporate Moral Responsibility in Health Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):139-146.
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – of whether it makes sense to hold an organisation corporately morally responsible for its actions,rather than holding responsible the individuals who contributed to that action – has been debated over a number of years in the business ethics literature. However, it has had little attention in the world of health care ethics. Health care in the United Kingdom(UK) is becoming an increasingly corporate responsibility, so the issue is increasingly relevant in the health care (...)
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