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Profile: Steve Clarke (Charles Sturt University)
Profile: Steven W. Clarke (Trinity College Dublin)
  1. Kenneth Christie, Steve Clarke & Rory J. Conces (forthcoming). Contributors to Theoria 91. Theoria.
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  2. Mark Sheehan, Claire Timlin, Ken Peach, Ariella Binik, Wilson Puthenparampil, Mark Lodge, Sean Kehoe, Michael Brada, Neil Burnet, Steve Clarke, Adrian Crellin, Michael Dunn, Piero Fossati, Steve Harris, Michael Hocken, Tony Hope, Jonathan Ives, Tadashi Kamada, Alex John London, Robert Miller, Michael Parker, Madelon Pijls-Johannesma, Julian Savulescu, Susan Short, Loane Skene, Hirohiko Tsujii, Jeffrey Tuan & Charles Weijer (forthcoming). Position Statement on Ethics, Equipoise and Research on Charged Particle Radiation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101290.
    The use of charged-particle radiation therapy (CPRT) is an increasingly important development in the treatment of cancer. One of the most pressing controversies about the use of this technology is whether randomised controlled trials are required before this form of treatment can be considered to be the treatment of choice for a wide range of indications. Equipoise is the key ethical concept in determining which research studies are justified. However, there is a good deal of disagreement about how this concept (...)
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  3. Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh (2014). Imperialism, Progress, Developmental Teleology, and Interdisciplinary Unification. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):341-351.
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  4. Steve Clarke (2013). Intuitions as Evidence, Philosophical Expertise and the Developmental Challenge. Philosophical Papers 42 (2):175-207.
    Appeals to intuitions as evidence in philosophy are challenged by experimental philosophers and other critics. A common response to experimental philosophical criticisms is to hold that only professional philosophers? intuitions count as evidence in philosophy. This ?expert intuitions defence? is inadequate for two reasons. First, recent studies indicate significant variability in professional philosophers? intuitions. Second, the academic literature on professional intuitions gives us reasons to doubt that professional philosophers develop truth-apt intuitions. The onus falls on those who mount the expert (...)
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  5. Steve Clarke (2013). The Neuroscience of Decision Making and Our Standards for Assessing Competence to Consent. Neuroethics 6 (1):189-196.
    Rapid advances in neuroscience may enable us to identify the neural correlates of ordinary decision making. Such knowledge opens up the possibility of acquiring highly accurate information about people’s competence to consent to medical procedures and to participate in medical research. Currently we are unable to determine competence to consent with accuracy and we make a number of unrealistic practical assumptions to deal with our ignorance. Here I argue that if we are able to detect competence to consent and if (...)
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  6. Steve Clarke (2012). Coercion, Consequence and Salvation. In Yujin Nagasawa (ed.), Scientific Approaches to the Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. 205.
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  7. Steve Clarke & Rebecca Roache (2012). Introducing Transformative Technologies Into Democratic Societies. Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):27-45.
    Transformative technologies can radically alter human lives making us stronger, faster, more resistant to disease and so on. These include enhancement technologies as well as cloning and stem cell research. Such technologies are often approved of by many liberals who see them as offering us opportunities to lead better lives, but are often disapproved of by conservatives who worry about the many consequences of allowing these to be used. In this paper, we consider how a democratic government with mainly liberal (...)
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  8. Russell Powell, Steve Clarke & Julian Savulescu (2012). An Ethical and Prudential Argument for Prioritizing the Reduction of Parasite-Stress in the Allocation of Health Care Resources. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):90-91.
    The link between parasite-stress and complex psychological dispositions implies that the social, political, and economic benefits likely to flow from public health interventions that reduce rates of non-zoonotic infectious disease are far greater than have traditionally been thought. We sketch a prudential and ethical argument for increasing public health resources globally and redistributing these to focus on the alleviation of parasite-stress in human populations.
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  9. Rebecca Roach & Steve Clarke (2011). Bioconservatism, Bioliberalism, and the Wisdom of Reflecting on Repugnance. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (1):04-1.
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  10. Steve Clarke (2009). Naturalism, Science and the Supernatural. Sophia 48 (2):127-142.
    There is overwhelming agreement amongst naturalists that a naturalistic ontology should not allow for the possibility of supernatural entities. I argue, against this prevailing consensus, that naturalists have no proper basis to oppose the existence of supernatural entities. Naturalism is characterized, following Leiter and Rea, as a position which involves a primary commitment to scientific methodology and it is argued that any naturalistic ontological commitments must be compatible with this primary commitment. It is further argued that properly applied scientific method (...)
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  11. Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh (2009). Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations Between the Sciences. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):195 – 207.
    John Dupr argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupr has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of important (...)
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  12. S. Matthew Liao, Mark Sheehan & Steve Clarke (2009). Disclosing Clinical Trial Results: Publicity, Significance and Independence. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):3-5.
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  13. S. Matthew Liao, Mark Sheehan & Steve Clarke (2009). The Duty to Disclose Adverse Clinical Trial Results. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):24-32.
    Participants in some clinical trials are at risk of being harmed and sometimes are seriously harmed as a result of not being provided with available, relevant risk information. We argue that this situation is unacceptable and that there is a moral duty to disclose all adverse clinical trial results to participants in clinical trials. This duty is grounded in the human right not to be placed at risk of harm without informed consent. We consider objections to disclosure grounded in considerations (...)
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  14. Rebecca Roache & Steve Clarke (2009). Bioconservatism, Bioliberalism, and Repugnance. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (1):04.1-04.21.
    We consider the current debate between bioconservatives and their opponents—whom we dub bioliberals—about the moral acceptability of human enhancement and the policy implications of moral debates about enhancement. We argue that this debate has reached an impasse, largely because bioconservatives hold that we should honour intuitions about the special value of being human, even if we cannot identify reasons to ground those intuitions. We argue that although intuitions are often a reliable guide to belief and action, there are circumstances in (...)
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  15. Mark Sheehan & Steve Clarke (2009). The Duty to Disclose Adverse Clinical Trial Results. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):24 - 32.
    Participants in some clinical trials are at risk of being harmed and sometimes are seriously harmed as a result of not being provided with available, relevant risk information. We argue that this situation is unacceptable and that there is a moral duty to disclose all adverse clinical trial results to participants in clinical trials. This duty is grounded in the human right not to be placed at risk of harm without informed consent. We consider objections to disclosure grounded in considerations (...)
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  16. Steve Clarke (2008). Moral Minds. Minerva 46 (1):147-150.
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  17. Steve Clarke (2008). Sim and the City: Rationalism in Psychology and Philosophy and Haidt's Account of Moral Judgment. Philosophical Psychology 21 (6):799 – 820.
    Jonathan Haidt ( 2001 ) advances the 'Social Intuitionist' account of moral judgment , which he presents as an alternative to rationalist accounts of moral judgment , hitherto dominant in psychology. Here I consider Haidt's anti-rationalism and the debate that it has provoked in moral psychology , as well as some anti-rationalist philosophical claims that Haidt and others have grounded in the empirical work of Haidt and his collaborators. I will argue that although the case for anti-rationalism in moral psychology (...)
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  18. Steve Clarke (2007). Against the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):21-22.
    The contemporary behavioral sciences are disunified and could not easily become unified, as they operate with incompatible explanatory models. According to Gintis, tolerance of this situation is “scandalous” (sect. 12). I defend the ordinary behavioral scientist's lack of commitment to a unifying explanatory model and identify several reasons why the behavioral sciences should remain disunified for the foreseeable future. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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  19. Steve Clarke (2007). Conspiracy Theories and the Internet: Controlled Demolition and Arrested Development. Episteme 4 (2):167-180.
    Abstract Following Clarke (2002), a Lakatosian approach is used to account for the epistemic development of conspiracy theories. It is then argued that the hypercritical atmosphere of the internet has slowed down the development of conspiracy theories, discouraging conspiracy theorists from articulating explicit versions of their favoured theories, which could form the hard core of Lakatosian research pro grammes. The argument is illustrated with a study of the “controlled demolition” theory of the collapse of three towers at the World Trade (...)
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  20. Steve Clarke (2007). The Supernatural and the Miraculous. Sophia 46 (3):277 - 285.
    Both intention-based and causation-based definitions of the miraculous make reference to the term ‘supernatural’. Philosophers who define the miraculous appear to use this term in a loose way, perhaps meaning the nonnatural, perhaps meaning a subcategory of the nonnatural. Here I examine the aetiology of the term ‘supernatural’. I consider three outstanding issues regarding the meaning of the term and conclude that the supernatural is best understood as a subcategory of the nonnatural. In light of this clarification, I argue that (...)
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  21. Steve Clarke (2005). Future Technologies, Dystopic Futures and the Precautionary Principle. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):121-126.
    It is sometimes suggested that new research in such areas as artificial intelligence, nanotechnology and genetic engineering should be halted or otherwise restricted because of concerns about possible catastrophic scenarios. Proponents of such restrictions typically invoke the precautionary principle, understood as a tool of policy formulation, as part of their case. Here I examine the application of the precautionary principle to possible catastrophic scenarios. I argue, along with Sunstein (Risk and Reason: Safety, Law and the Environment. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, (...)
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  22. Steve Clarke (2004). Ontological Disunity and a Realism Worth Having. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):628-629.
    Ross & Spurrett (R&S) appear convinced that the world must have a unified ontological structure. This conviction is difficult to reconcile with a commitment to mainstream realism, which involves allowing that the world may be ontologically disunified. R&S should follow Kitcher by weakening their conception of unification so as to allow for the possibility of ontological disunity.
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  23. Steve Clarke & Justin Oakley (2004). Informed Consent and Surgeons' Performance. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):11 – 35.
    This paper argues that the provision of effective informed consent by surgical patients requires the disclosure of material information about the comparative clinical performance of available surgeons. We develop a new ethical argument for the conclusion that comparative information about surgeons' performance - surgeons' report cards - should be provided to patients, a conclusion that has already been supported by legal and economic arguments. We consider some recent institutional and legal developments in this area, and we respond to some common (...)
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  24. Steve Clarke (2003). Doctor, Doctor, Gimme the News. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 5.
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  25. Steve Clarke (2003). Luck and Miracles. Religious Studies 39 (4):471-474.
    In another paper published here, I criticized Stephen Mumford's causation-based analysis of miracles on the grounds of its failure to produce results that are consistent with ordinary intuitions. In a response to me, intended as a defence of Mumford's position, Morgan Luck finds fault with my rival approach to miracles on three grounds. In this response to Luck I argue that all three of his criticisms miss their mark. My response to Luck's final line of criticism helps shed (...)
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  26. Steve Clarke (2003). Response to Mumford and Another Definition of Miracles. Religious Studies 39 (4):459-463.
    Stephen Mumford concludes a recent paper in Religious Studies, in which he advances a new causation-based analysis of miracles, by stating that the onus is ‘on rival accounts of miracles to produce something that matches it’. I take up Mumford's challenge, defending an intention-based definition of miracles, which I developed earlier, that he criticizes. I argue that this definition of miracles is more consistent with ordinary intuitions about miracles than Mumford's causation-based alternative. I further argue that (...) has failed to demonstrate any advantages that his approach to miracles has over an intention-based approach. (shrink)
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  27. Steve Clarke (2002). Conspiracy Theories and Conspiracy Theorizing. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (2):131-150.
    The dismissive attitude of intellectuals toward conspiracy theorists is considered and given some justification. It is argued that intellectuals are entitled to an attitude of prima facie skepticism toward the theories propounded by conspiracy theorists, because conspiracy theorists have an irrational tendency to continue to believe in conspiracy theories, even when these take on the appearance of forming the core of degenerating research program. It is further argued that the pervasive effect of the "fundamental attribution error" can explain the behavior (...)
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  28. Steve Clarke (2001). Defensible Territory for Entity Realism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (4):701-722.
    In the face of argument to the contrary, it is shown that there is defensible middle ground available for entity realism, between the extremes of scientific realism and empiricist antirealism. Cartwright's ([1983]) earlier argument for defensible middle ground between these extremes, which depended crucially on the viability of an underdeveloped distinction between inference to the best explanation (IBE) and inference to the most probable cause (IPC), is examined and its defects are identified. The relationship between IBE and IPC is clarified (...)
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  29. Steve Clarke (2001). Informed Consent in Medicine in Comparison with Consent in Other Areas of Human Activity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):169-187.
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  30. Steve Clarke (1999). Empiricism, Capacities and Experiments. Science and Education 8 (4):363-374.
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  31. Steve Clarke (1999). Hume's Definition of Miracles Revised. American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (1):49 - 57.
    It is argued that Hume’s definition of miracle stands in need of revision because it fails to be inclusive of acts of supernatural intervention in the world which are non-law-violating. Potential revisions of the definition, due to Paul Dietl and Christopher Hughes are considered and found to be inadequate, and a new definition is put forward; a miracle is "an intended outcome of an intervention in the natural world by a supernatural agent." An objection to this definition is anticipated and (...)
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  32. Steve Clarke (1999). Justifying Deception in Social Science Research. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):151–166.
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  33. Steve Clarke (1999). Book Review:The Disunity of Science: Boundaries Contexts, and Power Peter Galison, David J. Stump. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 66 (3):506-.
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  34. Steve Clarke (1998). Cartwright on Fundamentalism. Theoria 45 (91):53-65.
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  35. Steve Clarke (1997). Pluralism Unconstrained. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2):143 – 146.
    The problem of constraining methodological pluralism is highlighted in a discussion of John Dupr 's The Disorder of Things . Dupr requires limits on what are to count as legitimate scientific methodologies. Although Dupr recognises this requirement, he fails in his attempt to appropriately ground such limitations.
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  36. Steve Clarke (1997). When to Believe in Miracles. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (1):95 - 102.
    Brierley et al argue that in cases where it is medically futile to continue providing life-sustaining therapies to children in intensive care, medical professionals should be allowed to withdraw such therapies, even when the parents of these children believe that there is a chance of a miracle cure taking place. In reasoning this way, Brierley et al appear to implicitly assume that miracle cures will never take place, but they do not justify this assumption and it would be very difficult (...)
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  37. Steve Clarke (1995). The Lies Remain the Same: A Reply to Chalmers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (1):152 – 155.
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