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Profile: Steven Fuller
  1. Steve Fuller, Review of Intellectual Impostures. [REVIEW]
    This is the follow-up book to the notorious Sokal Hoax. It includes the original article that appeared in the Spring 1996 issue of Social Text, along with an explication of all the relatively minor errors and jokes planted in the article that would have been caught by the cognoscenti in physics. That alone has been sufficient to attract global media attention about the alleged lack of quality control in cultural studies scholarship. However, Sokal and Bricmont are out for bigger game. (...)
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  2. Steve Fuller (forthcoming). Studies and the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  3. Steve Fuller (2014). Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History. Routledge.
    The theory of knowledge, or epistemology, is often regarded as a dry topic that bears little relation to actual knowledge practices. Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History addresses this perception by showing the roots, developments and prospects of modern epistemology from its beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present day. Beginning with an introduction to the central questions and problems in theory of knowledge, Steve Fuller goes on to demonstrate that contemporary epistemology is enriched by its interdisciplinarity, analysing keys (...)
     
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  4. Steve Fuller (2014). Neuroscience, Neurohistory, and the History of Science: A Tale of Two Brain Images. Isis 105 (1):100-109.
    This essay introduces a Focus section on “Neurohistory and History of Science” by distinguishing images of the brain as governor and as transducer: the former treat the brain as the executive control center of the body, the latter as an interface between the organism and reality at large. Most of the consternation expressed in the symposium about the advent of neurohistory derives from the brain-as-governor conception, which is rooted in a “biologistic” understanding of humanity that in recent years has become (...)
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  5. Steve Fuller (2014). Recovering Biology's Potential as a Science of Social Progress Reply to Renwick. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):497-505.
    Chris Renwick’s recent research into the fate of William Beveridge’s attempt to establish social biology as the foundational social science at the London School of Economics is history at its best by uncovering a moment in the past when decisions were taken comparable to ones being taken today. In this case, the issues concern the political and scientific foundations of the welfare state. By connecting Beveridge’s original reasoning to recruit Lancelot Hogben for the Rockefeller-sponsored social biology chair with his later (...)
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  6. Steve Fuller (2014). The Higher Whitewash. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1):86-101.
    An assessment of Joel Isaac’s recent, well-researched attempt to provide a context for the emergence of Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. That context consisted in the open space for cross-disciplinary projects between the natural and social sciences that existed at Harvard during the presidency of James Bryant Conant, from the early 1930s to the early 1950s. Isaac’s work at the Harvard archives adds interesting detail to a story whose general contours are already known. In particular, he reinforces the view (...)
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  7. Steve Fuller (2013). Book Review: The Dawn of Critical Neuroscience. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 26 (3):107-115.
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  8. Steve Fuller (2013). Deviant Interdisciplinarity as Philosophical Practice: Prolegomena to Deep Intellectual History. Synthese 190 (11):1899-1916.
    Philosophy may relate to interdisciplinarity in two distinct ways On the one hand, philosophy may play an auxiliary role in the process of interdisciplinarity, typically through conceptual analysis, in the understanding that the disciplines themselves are the main epistemic players. This version of the relationship I characterise as ‘normal’ because it captures the more common pattern of the relationship, which in turn reflects an acceptance of the division of organized inquiry into disciplines. On the other hand, philosophy may be itself (...)
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  9. Steve Fuller (2013). Entertainment as Key to Public Intellectual Agency: Response to Welsh. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (1):105-113.
    Scott Welsh is likely to elicit a sigh of relief from the many academics who struggle with what, if any, public intellectual persona they should adopt. Welsh (2012) argues against a broad swathe of mostly left-leaning rhetorical scholars that the academic’s democratic duty is adequately discharged by providing suitably ambivalent rhetorical resources for others to use in their political struggles. For Welsh, following Slavoj Žižek (2008), the scholar’s first obligation is to “enjoy your symptom”—that is, to demonstrate in one’s discursive (...)
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  10. Steve Fuller (2013). 'Never Let a Good Crisis Go to Waste': Moral Entrepreneurship, or the Fine Art of Recycling Evil Into Good. Business Ethics 22 (1):118-129.
    Moral entrepreneurship is the fine art of recycling evil into good by taking advantage of situations given or constructed as crises. It should be seen as the ultimate generalisation of the entrepreneurial spirit, whose peculiar excesses have always sat uneasily with homo oeconomicus as the constrained utility maximiser, an image that itself has come to be universalised. A task of this essay is to reconcile the two images in terms of what by the end I call ‘superutilitarianism’, which draws on (...)
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  11. Steve Fuller (2013). On Commodification and the Progress of Knowledge in Society: A Defence. Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 7 (1):12-20.
    In this paper I make more explicit a position that I have being advocating for more than two decades , though its full force does not seem to have been felt. I write in defence of the *commodification* rather than the simple *commercialisation* of knowledge. The two italicised terms are often spoken about in the same breath—and, to be sure, they are related to each other. But they are not the same. Commercialisation refers to the subjection of social life to (...)
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  12. Steve Fuller (2013). Preparing for Life in Humanity 2. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Philosophy for Humanity 2.0 -- Political economy for Humanity 2.0 -- Anthropology for Humanity 2.0 -- Ethics for Humanity 2.0 -- Epilogue: General education for Humanity 2.0: a focus on the brain.
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  13. Steve Fuller (2013). Red, Black, and Objective: Science, Sociology, and Anarchism. [REVIEW] Isis 104 (3):660-660.
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  14. Steve Fuller (2012). Anti-Inductivism as Worldview: The Philosophy of Karl Popper. In James R. Brown (ed.), Philosophy of Science: The Key Thinkers. Continuum Books. 112.
     
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  15. Steve Fuller (2012). Social Epistemology: A Quarter-Century Itinerary. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):267-283.
    Examining the origin and development of my views of social epistemology, I contrast my position with the position held by analytic social epistemologists. Analytic social epistemology (ASE) has failed to make significant progress owing, in part, to a minimal understanding of actual knowledge practices, a minimised role for philosophers in ongoing inquiry, and a focus on maintaining the status quo of epistemology as a field. As a way forward, I propose questions and future areas of inquiry for a post-ASE to (...)
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  16. Steve Fuller (2012). Science‐Mart: Privatizing American Science. [REVIEW] Isis 103:211-212.
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  17. Steve Fuller (2012). The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):113-123.
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford School in (...)
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  18. Steve Fuller (2012). Why Does History Matter to the Science Studies Disciplines? A Case for Giving the Past Back Its Future. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):562-585.
    Abstract Science and technology studies (STS) has perhaps provided the most ambitious set of challenges to the boundary separating history and philosophy of science since the 19th century idealists and positivists. STS is normally associated with `social constructivism', which when applied to history of science highlights the malleability of the modal structure of reality. Specifically, changes to what is (e.g. by the addition or removal of ideas or things) implies changes to what has been, can be and might be. Latour's (...)
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  19. Willem B. Drees & Steve Fuller (2011). Letter to the Editor. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):217-221.
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  20. Steve Fuller (2011). A Response to Mike Thike (2011). Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):75-78.
    First, I would like to thank Mike Thicke (2011) for his very perceptive and civil review of Science: The Art of Living. He himself alludes to the difficulty that reviewers have had with my previous books defending intelligent design as a necessary condition for the possibility of science, a point I have discussed in this journal (Fuller 2008b). Fuller (2010) has no less polarised reviewers. Here readers are invited to contrast the rather sophisticated critical review of Science that has already (...)
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  21. Steve Fuller (2011). Humanity 2. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  22. Steve Fuller (2011). Humanity 2.0: What It Means to Be Human Past, Present and Future. Palgrave Macmillan.
  23. Steve Fuller (2011). Philosophy as Failed Patricide. The European Legacy 16 (7):977 - 980.
    The European Legacy, Volume 16, Issue 7, Page 977-980, December 2011.
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  24. Steve Fuller (2010). Deviant Interdisciplinarity. In Julie Thompson Klein & Carl Mitcham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. Oup Oxford. 50--64.
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  25. Steve Fuller (2010). Disciplines in the Making. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 43 (4):607-609.
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  26. Steve Fuller (2010). History of Science for its Own Sake? History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):95-99.
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  27. Steve Fuller (2010). Humanity Without Vico Roger Smith, Being Human: Historical Knowledge and the Creation of Human Nature. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2007. Viii + 288 Pp. ISBN 978-0-7190-7498-1. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):202-206.
  28. Steve Fuller (2010). Protscience. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):46-47.
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  29. Steve Fuller (2010). Postmodernism's Epistemological Legacies: Objects Without Purpose. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1:101-120.
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  30. Steve Fuller (2010). Review of Theodore L. Brown, Imperfect Oracle: The Epistemic and Moral Authority of Science. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  31. Steve Fuller (2010). Thinking the Unthinkable as a Radical Scientific Project. Critical Review 22 (4):397-413.
    Philip Tetlock underestimates the import of his own Expert Political Judgment. It is much more than a critical scientific evaluation of the accuracy and consistency of political pundits. It also offers a blueprint for challenging expertise more generally-in the name of scientific advancement. “Thinking the unthinkable”-a strategy Tetlock employs when he gets experts to consider counterfactual scenarios that are far from their epistemic comfort zones-has had explosive consequences historically for both knowledge and morality by extending our sense of what is (...)
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  32. Steve Fuller (2010). Response to Lynch. Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):220-222.
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  33. Steve Fuller (2009). After the Open Society: Selected Social and Political Writings. [REVIEW] Isis 100:963-964.
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  34. Steve Fuller (2009). Another Way of Being a `Real Philosopher'. Metascience 18 (3):451-454.
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  35. Steve Fuller (2009). Book Reviews: Dissent Over Dissent: Reply to Richards Steve Fuller, Dissent Over Descent: Intelligent Design's Challenge to Darwinism. Thriplow, Cambs: Icon Books, 2008. V + 272 Pp. ISBN: 978-1840468-04-5. £12.99. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):117-122.
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  36. Steve Fuller (2009). Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):442-444.
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  37. Steve Fuller (2009). Humanities for Humanity 2.0: The Problem Of'human'as a Projectible Predicate. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 44:103-107.
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  38. Steve Fuller (2009). Humanity : The Always Already, or Never to Be, Object of the Social Sciences? In Jeroen Van Bouwel (ed.), The Social Sciences and Democracy. Palgrave Macmillan.
  39. Steve Fuller (2009). In Search of Sociological Foundations for the Project of Humanity Steve Fuller, The New Sociological Imagination. London: Sage Publications, 2006. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):138-145.
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  40. Steve Fuller (2009). Philosophy Os Science in an Age of Neo-Darwinian Apologetics. Ludus Vitalis 17 (32):247-257.
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  41. Steve Fuller, Prolegomena to a Critique of Pure Wisdom.
  42. Steve Fuller (2009). The Genealogy of Judgement: Towards a Deep History of Academic Freedom. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (2):164 - 177.
    The classical conception of academic freedom associated with Wilhelm von Humboldt and the rise of the modern university has a quite specific cultural foundation that centres on the controversial mental faculty of 'judgement'. This article traces the roots of 'judgement' back to the Protestant Reformation, through its heyday as the signature feature of German idealism, and to its gradual loss of salience as both a philosophical and a psychological concept. This trajectory has been accompanied by a general shrinking in the (...)
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  43. Steve Fuller (2009). The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies. [REVIEW] Isis 100:207-209.
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  44. Steve Fuller (2009). The Scientific Literature: A Guided Tour. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 42 (4):612-613.
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  45. Steve Fuller (2009). The Sociology of Intellectual Life: The Career of the Mind in and Around the Academy. Sage.
    1. The Place of Intellectual Life: The University -- The University as an Institutional Solution to the Problem of Knowledge -- The Alienability of Knowledge in Our So-called Knowledge Society -- The Knowledge Society as Capitalism of the Third Order -- Will the University Survive the Era of Knowledge Management? -- Postmodernism as an Anti-university Movement -- Regaining the University's Critical Edge by Historicizing the Curriculum -- Affirmative Action as a Strategy for Redressing the Balance Between Research and Teaching -- (...)
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  46. Steve Fuller (2008). Richard Rorty's Philosophical Legacy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):121-132.
    Richard Rorty's recent death has unleashed a strikingly mixed judgment of his philosophical legacy, ranging from claims to originality to charges of charlatanry. What is clear, however, is Rorty's role in articulating a distinctive American voice in the history of philosophy. He achieved this not only through his own wide-ranging contributions but also by repositioning the pragmatists, especially William James and John Dewey, in the philosophical mainstream. Rorty did for the United States what Hegel and Heidegger had done for Germany—to (...)
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  47. Steve Fuller (2008). Science Studies Goes Public: A Report on an Ongoing Performance. Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 2 (1):11.
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  48. Steve Fuller (2008). Standing Up for What You Don't Believe. The Philosophers' Magazine 41 (41):76-81.
    Knowledge is a collective enterprise, all of whose members potentially benefit from any one of them managing to achieve, or at least approximate, the truth. However, it does not follow that the best way to do this is by trying to establish the truth for oneself as a fixed belief and then making it plain for all to hear or see, so that it might spread like a virus, or “meme”, as Richard Dawkins might say.
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  49. Steve Fuller (2008). The Coroner is Not for Turning. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (3):383-387.
  50. Steve Fuller (2008). The Normative Turn: Counterfactuals and a Philosophical Historiography of Science. Isis 99:576-584.
    Counterfactual reasoning is broadly implicated in causal claims made by historians. However, this point is more generally recognized and accepted by economic historians than historians of science. A good site for examining alternative appeals to counterfactuals is to consider "what if" the Scientific Revolution had not occurred in seventeenth-century Europe. Two alternative interpretations are analyzed: that the revolution would eventually have happened somewhere else ("overdeterminism") or that the revolution would not have happened at all ("underdeterminism"). Broadly speaking, these two interpretations (...)
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