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Profile: Steve Vanderheiden (University of Colorado, Boulder)
  1. Jonathan Pickering & Steve Vanderheiden (2012). Introductory Note. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (4):421-422.
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  2. Jonathan Pickering, Steve Vanderheiden & Seumas Miller (2012). “If Equity’s in, We're Out”: Scope for Fairness in the Next Global Climate Agreement. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (4):423-443.
    At the United Nations climate change conference in 2011, parties decided to launch the “Durban Platform” to work towards a new long-term climate agreement. The decision was notable for the absence of any reference to “equity”, a prominent principle in all previous major climate agreements. Wealthy countries resisted the inclusion of equity on the grounds that the term had become too closely yoked to developing countries’ favored conception of equity. This conception, according to wealthy countries, exempts developing countries from making (...)
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  3. Steve Vanderheiden (2012). Coaxing Climate Policy Leadership. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (4):463-479.
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  4. Steve Vanderheiden (2012). Human Dignity. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (4):e8 - e10.
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  5. Steve Vanderheiden (2012). Stephen M. Gardiner, A Perfect Moral Storm: The Ethical Tragedy of Climate Change. Environmental Ethics 34 (3):331-332.
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  6. Terry Nardin, Henry Shue, Leif Wenar, Allen Buchanan, Robert O. Keohane, Steve Vanderheiden & Aidan Hehir (2011). Carnegie Council. Ethics and International Affairs 25.
     
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  7. Steve Vanderheiden (2011). Globalizing Responsibility for Climate Change. Ethics and International Affairs 25 (1):65-84.
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  8. Steve Vanderheiden & Melanie Sisson (2010). Ethically Responsible Leisure? Promoting Social and Environmental Justice Through Ecotourism. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):33-47.
    Ecotourism has been lauded as a potentially effective means for raising revenue for nature conservation, and certification schemes likewise promise to help to “sustain the well-being of local people” in ecotourist destinations. In this paper, we consider the social and environmental justice dimensions of ecotourism through the certification schemes that define the industry, treating the desire to engage in ethically responsible travel as a necessary but insufficient condition for bringing about these desired ends, and one that requires accurate and trustworthy (...)
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  9. Steve Vanderheiden (2009). Allocating Ecological Space. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):257-275.
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  10. Steve Vanderheiden (2009). Distinguishing Mitigation and Adaptation. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (3):283-286.
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  11. Steve Vanderheiden (2009). Neoliberal Environments. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):105-108.
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  12. Steve Vanderheiden (2008). Two Shades of Green. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):129-145.
    The politics of food illustrates an enduring tension within environmental ethics and green political theory: the oft-assumed division between those thinkers for whom humanitarian goals remain prominent but who situate them within a normative framework stressing environmental sustainability and those thinkers who reject any distinctively humanitarian interests as untenably anthropocentric. In posing the problem as a moral dilemma between feeding people and saving nature, light and dark green value theories are made to appear in stark contrast, with the former prescribing (...)
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  13. Steve Vanderheiden (2007). Climate Change and the Challenge of Moral Responsibility. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):85-92.
    The phenomenon of anthropogenic climate change—in which weather patterns and attendant ecological disruption result from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere through human activities—challenges several conventional assumptions regarding moral responsibility. Multifarious individual acts and choices contribute (often imperceptibly) to the causal chain that is expected to produce profound and lasting harm unless significant mitigation efforts begin soon. Attributing responsibility for such harmful consequences is complicated by what Derek Parfit terms “mistakes in moral mathematics,” or failures to correctly (...)
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  14. Steve Vanderheiden (2007). Understanding Environmental Policy. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):443-444.
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  15. Steve Vanderheiden (2006). Conservation, Foresight, and the Future Generations Problem. Inquiry 49 (4):337 – 352.
    The practice of conservation assumes that current persons have some obligations to future generations, but these obligations are complicated by a number of philosophical problems, chief among which is what Derek Parfit calls the Non-Identity Problem. Because our actions now will affect the identities of persons to be born in the distant future, we cannot say that those actions either benefit or harm those persons. Thus, a causal link between our acts and their consequences for particular persons is severed, and (...)
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  16. Steve Vanderheiden (2006). Two Shades of Green: Food and Environmental Sustainability. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):129-145.
    The politics of food illustrates an enduring tension within environmental ethics and green political theory: the oft-assumed division between those thinkers for whom humanitarian goals remain prominent but who situate them within a normative framework stressing environmental sustainability and those thinkers who reject any distinctively humanitarian interests as untenably anthropocentric. In posing the problem as a moral dilemma between feeding people and saving nature, light and dark green value theories are made to appear in stark contrast, with the former prescribing (...)
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  17. Steve Vanderheiden (2005). Missing the Forest for the Trees: Justice and Environmental Economics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (1):51-69.
    The field of environmental economics, while offering powerful tools for the diagnosis of environmental problems and the design of policy solutions to them, is unable to effectively incorporate normative concepts like justice or rights into its method of analysis, and so needs to be supplemented by a consideration of such concepts. I examine the two main schools of thought in environmental economics ? the New Resource Economics and Free Market Environmentalism ? in order to illustrate the shortcomings of their methods (...)
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  18. Steve Vanderheiden (2004). Justice in the Green House: Climate Change and the Idea of Fairness. Social Philosophy Today 19 (89):101.
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  19. Steve Vanderheiden (2004). Knowledge, Uncertainty, and Responsibility: Responding to Climate Change. Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (2):141-158.
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  20. Steve Vanderheiden (2004). One World: The Ethics of Globalization. Environmental Ethics 26 (2):209-212.
  21. Steve Vanderheiden (2003). Justice in the Greenhouse. Social Philosophy Today 19:89-101.
    The current debate surrounding the implementation of the Kyoto Treaty raises several issues that ought to be of interest to social and political philosophers. Proponents and critics alike have invoked ideas of fairness in justification of their positions. The two distinct conceptions of fairness that are involved in this debate—one of fair shares, and another of fair burdens—helpfully illuminate the proper role of fairness in designing an equitable and effective global climate regime. In this paper, I critically examine the idea (...)
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  22. Steve Vanderheiden (2002). Rousseau, Cronon, and the Wilderness Idea. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):169-188.
    William Cronon has recently argued that the current debate concerning justifications for protecting wilderness relies upon conceptions of natural value premised upon a nature/society dualism that originated in older nature writing but which still animates contemporary thinking. This dualism, he argues, prevents adequate realization of the human and social places in nature, and is ultimately counterproductiveto the task of articulating the proper relationship between humans and the natural world. While the origin of one of these conceptions of natural value (the (...)
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  23. Steve Vanderheiden (1999). Why the State Should Stay Out of the Wedding Chapel. Public Affairs Quarterly 13 (2):175-190.
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