Search results for 'Steven Bird' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  48
    Catherine Lai & Steven Bird (2010). Querying Linguistic Trees. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 19 (1):53-73.
    Large databases of linguistic annotations are used for testing linguistic hypotheses and for training language processing models. These linguistic annotations are often syntactic or prosodic in nature, and have a hierarchical structure. Query languages are used to select particular structures of interest, or to project out large slices of a corpus for external analysis. Existing languages suffer from a variety of problems in the areas of expressiveness, efficiency, and naturalness for linguistic query. We describe the domain of linguistic trees and (...)
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  2.  34
    Graham Bird (1998). Kantian Themes in Contemporary Philosophy: Graham Bird. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):131–152.
    [Michael Friedman] This paper considers the extent to which Kant's vision of a distinctively 'transcendental' task for philosophy is essentially tied to his views on the foundations of the mathematical and physical sciences. Contemporary philosophers with broadly Kantian sympathies have attempted to reinterpret his project so as to isolate a more general philosophical core not so closely tied to the details of now outmoded mathematical-physical theories (Euclidean geometry and Newtonian physics). I consider two such attempts, those of Strawson and McDowell, (...)
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  3. Alexander Bird (2010). The Epistemology of Science—a Bird's-Eye View. Synthese 175 (1):5 - 16.
    In this paper I outline my conception of the epistemology of science, by reference to my published papers, showing how the ideas presented there fit together. In particular I discuss the aim of science, scientific progress, the nature of scientific evidence, the failings of empiricism, inference to the best (or only) explanation, and Kuhnian psychology of discovery. Throughout, I emphasize the significance of the concept of scientific knowledge.
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  4. Alexander Bird (2008). Review of Alexander Bird, Nature's Metaphysics: Laws and Properties. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
    This is a rewarding book. In terms of area, it has one foot firmly planted in metaphysics and the other just as firmly set in the philosophy of science. Nature's Metaphysics is distinctive for its thorough and detailed defense of fundamental, natural properties as essentially dispositional and for its description of how these dispositional properties are thus suited to sustain the laws of nature as (metaphysically) necessary truths.
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  5.  3
    Graham Bird (1996). McDowell's Kant: Mind and World: Graham Bird. Philosophy 71 (276):219-243.
    McDowell's Mind and World is a commentary on a traditional, dualist, epistemology which puzzles over, and offers accounts of, a fundamental division between mental, subjective items, and nonmental, objective items in experience. The principal responses to that tradition which McDowell considers are those of Davidson's coherentism, Evans's form of realism, and Kant; but it is Kant's famous B75 text which occupies centre stage: ‘Gedanken ohne Inhalt sind leer; Anschauungen ohne Begriffe sind blind’.
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  6. Alexander Bird (1998). Philosophy of Science Alexander Bird.
     
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  7. Alexander Bird (2010). The Epistemology of Science—a Bird’s-Eye View. Synthese 175 (S1):5-16.
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  8. Alexander Bird (1999). Explanation and Laws. Synthese 120 (1):1--18.
    In this paper I examine two aspects of Hempel’s covering-law models of explanation. These are (i) nomic subsumption and (ii) explication by models. Nomic subsumption is the idea that to explain a fact is to show how it falls under some appropriate law. This conception of explanation Hempel explicates using a pair of models, where, in this context, a model is a template or pattern such that if something fits it, then that thing is an explanation. A range of well-known (...)
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  9.  99
    Michael Friedman & Graham Bird (1998). Kantian Themes in Contemporary Philosophy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):111–130.
    [Michael Friedman] This paper considers the extent to which Kant's vision of a distinctively 'transcendental' task for philosophy is essentially tied to his views on the foundations of the mathematical and physical sciences. Contemporary philosophers with broadly Kantian sympathies have attempted to reinterpret his project so as to isolate a more general philosophical core not so closely tied to the details of now outmoded mathematical-physical theories (Euclidean geometry and Newtonian physics). I consider two such attempts, those of Strawson and McDowell, (...)
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  10.  82
    Stephanic J. Bird & Diane Hoffman-Kim (1998). Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don't: The Scientific Community's Responses to Whistleblowing. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):3-6.
    The papers in this issue are based on presentations by the authors at the 163nd National Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Seattle, Washington, 13–18 February 1997 in the session entitled Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t: What the Scientific Community Can Do about Whistleblowing organized by Stephanie J. Bird and Diane Hoffman-Kim. The papers have been modified following double blind peer review.
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  11. Alexander Bird, Book Reviews. [REVIEW]
    This book is part of the Fundamentals in Philosophy series, edited by John Shand, offering introductions to core areas of philosophy which are “not mere bland expositions, and as such are original pieces of philosophy in their own right”. Alexander Bird’s book meets this remit admirably. In my review I shall concentrate on the philosophical argument of the work and set aside its merits as a student text though they compare well with rivals currently on offer.
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  12.  6
    Graham Bird (2013). Review: Guyer, The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):137-143.
    Book Reviews Graham Bird, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  13.  3
    Graham Bird (2013). Review: Guyer (Ed), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):137-143.
    Book Reviews Graham Bird, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  14.  1
    Paul Bird (2014). Living Liturgy: The Vision of Vatican II. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (3):334.
    Bird, Paul The past couple of years have seen a number of golden jubilees in connection with the Second Vatican Council. I would mention two in particular. October 2012 saw the fiftieth anniversary of the start of the council, when Pope John XXIII gave his opening address to the great gathering of bishops in St Peter's Basilica. December last year saw the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of the council's first major document, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy.
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  15.  1
    Graham Bird (2013). Review: Guyer (Ed), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):137-143.
    Book Reviews Graham Bird, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  16.  1
    Graham Bird (2013). Review: Guyer, The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):137-143.
    Book Reviews Graham Bird, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  17. Alexander Bird (1998). Philosophy of Science. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Many introductions to this field start with the problem of justifying scientific knowledge but Alexander Bird begins by examining the subject matter, or metaphysics, of science. Using topical scientific debates he vividly elucidates what it is for the world to be governed by laws of nature. This idea provides the basis for explanations and causes and leads to a discussion of natural kinds and theoretical entities. With this foundation in place he goes on to consider the epistemological issues of (...)
     
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  18. Colin Bird (2007). The Myth of Liberal Individualism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book challenges us to look at liberal political ideas in a fresh way. Colin Bird examines the assumption, held both by liberals and by their strongest critics, that the values and ideals of the liberal political tradition cohere around a distinctively 'individualist' conception of the relation between individuals, society and the state. He concludes that the formula of 'liberal individualism' conceals fundamental conflicts between liberal views of these relations, conflicts that neither liberals nor their critics have adequately recognized. (...)
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  19. Robert Bird (2006). The Russian Prospero: The Creative Universe of Viacheslav Ivanov. University of Wisconsin Press.
    Viacheslav Ivanov, the central intellectual force in Russian modernism, achieved through his work an original synthesis of Christianity, Platonism, and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. His powerful intellect exerted an immeasurable influence in modernist Russia and the early Soviet Union, and after emigrating to Italy in 1924 he played an important role in intellectual debates in Western Europe between the wars. In recent years, Ivanov's manifold contributions have been recognized in all major aspects of Russian culture, including poetry, literary theory, (...)
     
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  20.  14
    Steven A. Miller (1999). The Erotic Bird. Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):962-964.
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  21.  16
    Graham H. Bird (1971). Minds and States of Mind. Philosophical Quarterly 21 (July):244-246.
  22. Alexander Bird (1994). Rationality and the Structure of Self-Deception. In Gianfranco Soldati (ed.), European Review of Philosophy, 1: Philosophy of Mind. Stanford: CSLI Publications 19-38.
     
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  23.  51
    Edward Kanterian (2013). The Ideality of Space and Time: Trendelenburg Versus Kant, Fischer and Bird. Kantian Review 18 (2):263-288.
    Trendelenburg argued that Kant's arguments in support of transcendental idealism ignored the possibility that space and time are both ideal and real. Recently, Graham Bird has claimed that Trendelenburg (unlike his contemporary Kuno Fischer) misrepresented Kant, confusing two senses of . I defend Trendelenburg's : the ideas of space and time, as a priori and necessary, are ideal, but this does not exclude their validity in the noumenal realm. This undermines transcendental idealism. Bird's attempt to show that the (...)
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  24.  38
    Vassilios Livanios (2008). Bird and the Dispositional Essentialist Account of Spatiotemporal Relations. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 39 (2):383 - 394.
    The basic principles of dispositional essentialism do not require that the fundamental spatiotemporal relations are dispositional in nature. Nevertheless, Bird (who defends dispositional monism) argues that they possess dispositional essences in virtue of the fact that the obtaining of these relations can be characterised by the satisfaction of a certain counterfactual. In this paper I argue that his suggestion fails, and so, despite his attempt, the case of the spatiotemporal relations remains the ‘big bad bug’ for the thesis of (...)
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  25.  82
    Christine M. Korsgaard (2011). Natural Goodness, Rightness, and the Intersubjectivity of Reason: Reply to Arroyo, Cummiskey, Moland, and Bird-Pollan. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):381-394.
    Abstract: In response to Arroyo, I explain my position on the concept of “natural goodness” and how my use of that concept compares to that of Geach and Foot. An Aristotelian or functional notion of goodness provides the material for Kantian endorsement in a theory of value that avoids a metaphysical commitment to intrinsic values. In response to Cummiskey, I review reasons for thinking Kantianism and consequentialism incompatible, especially those objections to aggregation that arise from the notion of the natural (...)
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  26.  18
    George Klosko (2001). The Natural Basis of Political Obligation. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):93-114.
    Though questions of political obligation have long been central to liberal political theory, discussion has generally focused on voluntaristic aspects of the individual's relationship to the state, as opposed to other factors through which the state is able to ground compliance with its laws. The individual has been conceptualized as naturally without political ties, whether or not formally in a state of nature, and questions of political obligation have centered on accounting for political bonds.Footnotes* For helpful comments on and discussion (...)
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  27.  37
    Gary M. Hamburg & Randall Allen Poole (eds.) (2010). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830-1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction: the humanist tradition in Russian philosophy G. M. Hamburg and Randall A. Poole; Part I. The Nineteenth Century: 1. Slavophiles, Westernizers, and the birth of Russian philosophical humanism Sergey Horujy; 2. Alexander Herzen Derek Offord; 3. Materialism and the radical intelligentsia: the 1860s Victoria S. Frede; 4. Russian ethical humanism: from populism to neo-idealism Thomas Nemeth; Part II. Russian Metaphysical Idealism in Defense of Human Dignity: 5. Boris Chicherin and human dignity (...)
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  28.  11
    Raf de Bont (2011). Poetry and Precision: Johannes Thienemann, the Bird Observatory in Rossitten and Civic Ornithology, 1900–1930. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):171-203.
    In the early twentieth century, ornithology underwent significant changes. So far, these changes, basically, have been studied by focussing on the elite of professional biologists working at universities or state museums. However, important developments also occurred in what Lynn Nyhart has called “the civic realm” of science – the sphere given form by private naturalist associations, nature writers, taxidermists and school teachers. This article studies the changing dynamics of civic ornithology, by looking at one particular case: the influential orinthological observatory (...)
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  29.  17
    Chhanda Chakraborti (2009). Pandemic Management and Developing World Bioethics: Bird Flu in West Bengal. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):161-166.
    This paper examines the case of a recent H5N1virus (avian influenza) outbreak in West Bengal, an eastern state of India, and argues that poorly executed pandemic management may be viewed as a moral lapse. It further argues that pandemic management initiatives are intimately related to the concept of health as a social 'good' and to the moral responsibility of protection from foreseeable social harm from an infectious disease. The initiatives, therefore, have to be guided by special moral obligations towards biorisk (...)
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  30.  4
    Robert B. Talisse, Maureen Eckert, Norman Bowie, Steven M. Cahn, Randall Curren, Alan Goldman, Tziporah Kasachkoff, Peter Markie, John O'Connor, David Rosenthal, Robert Simon, David Shatz, George Sher, Douglas Stalker & Christine Vitrano (2009). A Teacher's Life: Essays for Steven M. Cahn. Lexington Books.
    This is a collection of 13 essays honoring Steven Cahn, presented to him on the occasion of his 25th year as Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York. The essays address issues concerning the teaching of philosophy, the responsibilities of professors, and the good life.
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  31. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2010). What Scientific Progress Is Not: Against Bird's Epistemic View. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (3):241-255.
    This paper challenges Bird’s view that scientific progress should be understood in terms of knowledge, by arguing that unjustified scientific beliefs (and/or changes in belief) may nevertheless be progressive. It also argues that false beliefs may promote progress.
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  32.  11
    Max Loxterkamp (2016). Morality, Objective Value and Living a Meaningful Life: A Reply to Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano's Essay ‘Living Well’. Think 15 (43):117-123.
    In their essay, Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano argue that to live a meaningful life all we must do is find personal satisfaction and enjoyment. They argue against other philosophers who claim that activities are what make a life meaningful. There are two problems with what they argue in the essay. The first relates to a particular criticism they make of some of those philosophers taking the contrary view, in regards to the difficulty those philosophers have in deeming (...)
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  33.  51
    Gary Hatfield (1995). In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy by R. Steven Turner. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 86:664-665.
    Review of: R. Steven Turner, In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy. xiv + 338 pp., frontis., illus., figs., tables, bibl., index. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994.
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  34.  8
    Jeremy N. Bailenson, Michael S. Shum, Scott Atran, Douglas L. Medin & John D. Coley (2002). A Bird's Eye View: Biological Categorization and Reasoning Within and Across Cultures. Cognition 84 (1):1-53.
    Many psychological studies of categorization and reasoning use undergraduates to make claims about human conceptualization. Generalizability of findings to other populations is often assumed but rarely tested. Even when comparative studies are conducted, it may be challenging to interpret differences. As a partial remedy, in the present studies we adopt a 'triangulation strategy' to evaluate the ways expertise and culturally different belief systems can lead to different ways of conceptualizing the biological world. We use three groups (US bird experts, (...)
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  35. David Goodman (1995). Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Intimations of Postmodernity (Routledge, 1992); Steven Seidman and David G. Wagner (Eds), Postmodernism and Social Theory (Blackwell, 1992); Stephen Crook, Jan Pakulski and Malcolm Wa Ters, Postmodernization: Change in Advanced Society (Sage Publica Tions, 1992); Gianni Vattimo, The End of Modernity—Nihilism and Hermeneutics in Post-Modern Culture (Polity Press, 1988). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 40 (1):138-146.
    Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Intimations of Postmodernity ; Steven Seidman and David G. Wagner , Postmodernism and Social Theory ; Stephen Crook, Jan Pakulski and Malcolm Wa ters, Postmodernization: Change in Advanced Society ; Gianni Vattimo, The End of Modernity—Nihilism and Hermeneutics in Post-modern Culture.
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  36.  57
    Howard Sankey (2014). On Relativism and Pluralism: Response to Steven Bland. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:98-103.
    This paper responds to criticism presented by Steven Bland of my naturalistic approach to epistemic relativism. In my view, the central argument for epistemic relativism derives from the Pyrrhonian problem of the criterion. This opens relativism to an anti-sceptical response. I combine Roderick Chisholm’s particularist response to the problem of the criterion with a reliabilist conception of epistemic warrant. A distinction is made between epistemic norms which provide genuine warrant and those which do not. On the basis of this (...)
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  37.  4
    Chiara Lepora & Robert E. Goodin (forthcoming). On Complicity and Compromise: A Reply to Peter French and Steven Ratner. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-12.
    Peter French’s and Steven Ratner’s thoughtful comments are helpful in advancing the analysis we offered in our book On Complicity and Compromise. Inevitably, there are areas of disagreement and bones to pick. However, our primary concern in this reply will be to press, with their assistance, the more positive agenda.
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  38. Lars Bo Gundersen (2000). Bird on Dispositions and Antidotes. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (199):227-229.
    In The Philosophical Quarterly, 48 , Alexander Bird raises an objection against the conditional analysis of dispositions: where an ‘antidote’ is present all the supposed conditions for manifestation of a disposition are fulfilled but the manifestation does not occur. But Bird’s argument suffers from equivocation. If we spell out properly whether the disposition's conditions are to include the presence of the antidote or not, the apparent counter‐examples disappear. So his examples do not undermine the conditional analysis of dispositions; (...)
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  39. Peter Menzies (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Alexander Bird, Nature's Metaphysics: Laws and Properties. Analysis.
    This book advocates dispositional essentialism, the view that natural properties have dispositional essences.1 So, for example, the essence of the property of being negatively charged is to be disposed to attract positively charged objects. From this fact it follows that it is a law that all negatively charged objects will attract positively 10 charged objects; and indeed that this law is metaphysically necessary. Since the identity of the property of being negatively charged is determined by its being related in a (...)
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  40.  11
    Inga Römer (2014). Steven Crowell: Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger. Husserl Studies 30 (3):283-291.
    In seinem neuen Buch vertieft Steven Crowell seine Auffassung der Phänomenologie als Transzendentalphilosophie, die es mit dem normativen Raum des Sinnes (space of meaning) zu tun habe (vgl. Crowell 2001). Sowohl Husserl als auch Heidegger führen aus seiner Sicht innerhalb der Phänomenologie die kantische Tradition der Transzendentalphilosophie weiter, indem sie der Frage nach den „transzendentalen Bedingungen der Konstitution oder Enthüllung des Sinnes“ (S. 1) nachgehen.Vgl. auch den von Steven Crowell mit herausgegebenen Band Transcendental Heidegger (2007). Da der Sinn (...)
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  41.  49
    Sungho Choi (2003). Improving Bird's Antidotes. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):573 – 580.
    In this paper I will first consider Bird's cases against the conditional analysis of dispositions and defend them from Gundersen's objection. This does not mean that I believe that Bird's cases are successful. To the contrary, I take it that we can save the conditional analysis from Bird's cases by taking Lewis's two-step approach to dispositions. However, I will go on to argue that if Bird's cases are supplemented with the assumption that dispositions are intrinsic matter, (...)
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  42. Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (2003). Resemblance Nominalism and Counterparts: Reply to Bird. Analysis 63 (3):229–237.
    In my book *Resemblance Nominalism* I argued that the truthmakers of ´a and b resemble each other´ are just a and b. In his "Resemblance Nominalism and counterparts" Alexander Bird objects to my claim that the truthmakers of ´a and b resemble each other´ are just a and b. In this paper I respond to Bird´s objections.
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  43.  29
    Steven Pinker (2002). Steven Pinker. Cognitive Science 1991 (1996).
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  44. Harold W. Noonan (2010). Bird Against the Humeans. Ratio 23 (1):73-86.
    Debate between Humean contingentists and anti-Humean necessitarians in the philosophy of science is ongoing. One of the most important contemporary anti-Humeans is Alexander Bird. Bird calls the particular version of Humeanism he is opposed to 'categoricalism'. In his paper (2005) and in Chapter 4 of his book (2007) Bird argues against categoricalism about properties and laws. His arguments against categoricalism about properties are intended to support the necessitarian position he calls dispositional monism. His arguments against categoricalism about (...)
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  45.  16
    Arne Rasmusson (2012). Science as Salvation: George Lakoff and Steven Pinker as Secular Political Theologians. Modern Theology 28 (2):197-228.
    This article critically analyzes two leading cognitive scientists, George Lakoff and Steven Pinker, as competing secular political “theologians”. The idea of Science as savior is at the heart of the set of stories modernity tells about itself. The modern world, it is assumed, has left the age of religion and reached the age of Science. Lakoff and Pinker, who advocate opposing moral and political worldviews, make their claims on the basis of their scientific work, but it is implicit narratives (...)
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  46.  58
    Erasmo Recami (2001). Superluminal Motions? A Bird's-Eye View of the Experimental Situation. Foundations of Physics 31 (7):1119-1135.
    In this article, after a theoretical introduction and a sketch of some related long-standing predictions, a bird's-eye view is presented—with the help of nine figures—of the various experimental sectors of physics in which Superluminal motions seem to appear (thus contributing support to those past predictions). In particular, a panorama is presented of the experiments with evanescent waves and/or tunnelling photons, and with the “localized Superluminal solutions” to the Maxwell equations (like the so-called X-shaped beams). The present review is brief, (...)
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  47.  40
    Thomas Boyer (2014). Is a Bird in the Hand Worth Two in the Bush? Or, Whether Scientists Should Publish Intermediate Results. Synthese 191 (1):17-35.
    A part of the scientific literature consists of intermediate results within a longer project. Scientists often publish a first result in the course of their work, while aware that they should soon achieve a more advanced result from this preliminary result. Should they follow the proverb “a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush”, and publish any intermediate result they get? This is the normative question addressed in this paper. My aim is to clarify, to refine, (...)
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  48.  2
    Victor Forte (2016). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who dominated (...)
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  49.  48
    Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such (...)
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  50.  13
    Patricia K. Anderson (2003). A Bird in the House: An Anthropological Perspective on Companion Parrots. Society and Animals 11 (4):393-418.
    Although companion birds are the third most-common animal companion—after dogs and cats—in U.S. households, few anthrozoological publications focus on them. This study examines the role of companion parrots in American households. The study combines a literature review with the results of a survey of bird owners and participant observation. The study uses the resulting qualitative and quantitative data in addressing the social dynamics of companion parrot ownership in the household. The data support the impression that companion parrots increasingly are (...)
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