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  1.  29
    Harald Thorsrud & Steven Gerrard (2009). Ancient Scepticism. University of California Press.
    Scepticism, a philosophical tradition that casts doubt on our ability to gain knowledge of the world and suggests suspending judgment in the face of uncertainty, has been influential since its beginnings in ancient Greece. Harald Thorsrud provides an engaging, rigorous introduction to the central themes, arguments, and general concerns of ancient Scepticism, from its beginnings with Pyrrho of Elis to the writings of Sextus Empiricus in the second century A.D. Thorsrud explores the differences among Sceptics and examines in particular the (...)
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  2. James Warren & Steven Gerrard (2007). Presocratics: Natural Philosophers Before Socrates. University of California Press.
    The earliest phase of philosophy in Europe saw the beginnings of cosmology and rational theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethical and political theory. It also saw the development of a wide range of radical and challenging ideas, from Thales' claim that magnets have souls and Parmenides' account of one unchanging existence to the development of an atomist theory of the physical world. This general account of the Presocratics introduces the major Greek philosophical thinkers from the sixth to the middle of the (...)
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  3.  3
    Steven Gerrard (1999). II–Steven Gerrard. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):135-150.
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    Steven Gerrard (1999). How Old Are These Bones? Putnam, Wittgenstein and Verification: Steven Gerrard. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):135–150.
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  5. William Desmond & Steven Gerrard (2008). Cynics. University of California Press.
    Far from being pessimistic or nihilistic, as modern uses of the term "cynic" suggest, the ancient Cynics were astonishingly optimistic regarding human nature. They believed that if one simplified one's life—giving up all unnecessary possessions, desires, and ideas—and lived in the moment as much as possible, one could regain one's natural goodness and happiness. It was a life exemplified most famously by the eccentric Diogenes, nicknamed "the Dog," and his followers, called dog-philosophers, _kunikoi, _or Cynics. Rebellious, self-willed, and ornery but (...)
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  6. Steven Gerrard (2002). One Wittgenstein? In Erich H. Reck (ed.), From Frege to Wittgenstein: Perspectives on Early Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press 52--71.
     
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  7. Pauliina Remes & Steven Gerrard (2008). Neoplatonism. University of California Press.
    Although Neoplatonism has long been studied, until recently many had dismissed this complex system of ideas as more mystical than philosophical. Recent research, however, has provided a new perspective on this highly influential school of thought, which flourished in the pagan world of Greece and Rome up through late antiquity. Pauliina Remes's lucid, comprehensive, and up-to-date introduction reassesses Neoplatonism's philosophical credentials, from its founding by Plotinus through the closure of Plato's Academy in 529. Using an accessible, thematic approach, she explores (...)
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