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  1. Steven H. Miles (forthcoming). 17 Informed Demand for" Non—Beneficial" Medical Treatment. Bioethics: Basic Writings on the Key Ethical Questions That Surround the Major, Modern Biological Possibilities and Problems.
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  2. Steven H. Miles (2014). Accountability for Doctors Who Torture. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):59-59.
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  3. Ruth A. Mickelsen, Daniel S. Bernstein, Mary Faith Marshall & Steven H. Miles (2013). The Barnes Case: Taking Difficult Futility Cases Public. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):374-378.
    Futility disputes are increasing and courts are slowly abandoning their historical reluctance to engage these contentious issues, particularly when confronted with inappropriate surrogate demands for aggressive treatment. Use of the judicial system to resolve futility disputes inevitably brings media attention and requires clinicians, hospitals, and families to debate these deep moral conflicts in the public eye. A recent case in Minnesota, In re Emergency Guardianship of Albert Barnes, explores this emerging trend and the complex responsibilities of clinicians and hospital administrators (...)
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  4. Steven H. Miles (2013). Military Doctors and Deaths by Torture: When a Witness Becomes an Accessory. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):1 - 2.
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  5. Steven H. Miles (2013). The New Military Medical Ethics: Legacies of the Gulf Wars and the War on Terror. Bioethics 27 (3):117-123.
    United States military medical ethics evolved during its involvement in two recent wars, Gulf War I (1990–1991) and the War on Terror (2001–). Norms of conduct for military clinicians with regard to the treatment of prisoners of war and the administration of non-therapeutic bioactive agents to soldiers were set aside because of the sense of being in a ‘new kind of war’. Concurrently, the use of radioactive metal in weaponry and the ability to measure the health consequences of trade embargos (...)
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  6. Steven H. Miles (2009). Commentary on Psychiatry in a Battle Zone. Bioethics 24 (6):307-308.
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  7. Steven H. Miles (2007). Medical Ethics and the Interrogation of Guantanamo 063. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):5 – 11.
    The controversy over abusive interrogations of prisoners during the war against terrorism spotlights the need for clear ethics norms requiring physicians and other clinicians to prevent the mistreatment of prisoners. Although policies and general descriptions pertaining to clinical oversight of interrogations in United States' war on terror prisons have come to light, there are few public records detailing the clinical oversight of an interrogation. A complaint by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) led to an Army investigation of an interrogation (...)
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  8. Steven H. Miles (2005). Samuel Gorovitz, Ph. D. HEC Forum 17 (3):237-239.
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  9. Steven H. Miles (2004). Medical Ethicists, Human Curiosities, and the New Media Midway. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):39 – 43.
    Medical ethicists have assumed a role in justifying public voyeurism of human "curiosities." This role has precedent in how scientists and natural philosophers once legitimized the marketing of museums of "human curiosities." At the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians dissociated themselves from entrepreneurial displays of persons with anomalies, and such commercial exhibits went into decline. Today, news media, principally on television, promote news features about persons that closely resemble the nineteenth century exhibits of human curiosities. Reporters solicit medical ethicists (...)
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  10. Steven H. Miles (2004). The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    This short work examines what the Hippocratic Oath said to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one passage of the Oath and concludes with a modern case discussion. This book is for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of the profession.
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  11. Steven H. Miles, N. Yasemin Oguz, Nuket Buken, Amp & Others) (2003). End-of-Life Care in Turkey. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):279-284.
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  12. N. Yasemin Oguz, Steven H. Miles, Nuket Buken & Murat Civaner (2003). End-of-Life Care in Turkey. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):279-284.
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  13. Steven H. Miles (2002). Concealing Accidental Nursing Home Deaths. HEC Forum 14 (3):224-234.
    Nursing homes' ethics committees play a role in designing policies to assure ethical care. The administrative structure of nursing homes is not as large as that of hospitals. Nursing home staff and administration can respond to medical accidents in a way that treats family unethically and does serious harm to the facility. This paper describes incidents in which nursing homes attempted to conceal accidental deaths. It describes how such incidents are discovered, and the consequences of such efforts, and suggests ways (...)
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  14. Steven H. Miles (2002). Introduction: HEC Forum From Minnesota. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 14 (3):195-196.
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  15. Steven H. Miles (2002). On a New Charter to Defend Medical Professionalism: Whose Profession is It Anyway? Hastings Center Report 32 (3):46-48.
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  16. Steven H. Miles (1998). Restraints: Controlling a Symptom or a Symptom of Control. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 10 (3-4):235-243.
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  17. Kate Christensen & Steven H. Miles (1997). The Ethical Importance of Differences Between Managed Care Systems. HEC Forum 9 (4):313-322.
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  18. Steven H. Miles (1995). Physician‐Assisted Suicide and the Profession's Gyrocompass. Hastings Center Report 25 (3):17-19.
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  19. Steven H. Miles & Robert Koepp (1995). Comments on the AMA Report" Ethical Issues in Managed Care". Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (4):306.
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  20. Steven H. Miles & Ruth A. Mickelsen (1995). Introduction: Managed Health Care: New Institutions and Time-Honored Values. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (3):221-222.
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  21. Karen H. Rothenberg & Steven H. Miles (1994). Introduction. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):104-104.
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  22. Robert A. Pearlman, Steven H. Miles & Robert M. Arnold (1993). Contributions of Empirical Research to Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3).
    Empirical research pertaining to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), clinician behaviors related to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and substituted judgment suggests potential contributions to medical ethics. Research quantifying the likelihood of surviving CPR points to the need for further philosophical analysis of the limitations of the patient autonomy in decision making, the nature and definition of medical futility, and the relationship between futility and professional standards. Research on DNR orders has identified barriers to the goal of patient involvement in these life and death (...)
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  23. Steven H. Miles (1992). Clinical Ethics and Reform of Access to Health Care. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (3):255-257.
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  24. Steven H. Miles (1992). Interpersonal Issues in the Wanglie Case. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (1):61-72.
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  25. Steven H. Miles (1992). Medical Futility. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):310-315.
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  26. Steven H. Miles (1992). New Business for Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 4:97-102.
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  27. Steven H. Miles (1991). Legal Procedures in Wanglie: A Two-Step, Not a Sidestep. Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (4):285.
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  28. Steven H. Miles (1990). Why a Hospital Seeks to Discontinue Care Against Family Wishes. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (4):424-426.
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  29. Steven H. Miles & Allison August (1990). Courts, Gender and "The Right to Die". Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (1-2):85-95.
  30. Greg A. Sachs, Steven H. Miles & Rebekah A. Levin (1990). Emergencies and Advance Directives. Hastings Center Report 20 (6):42-43.
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  31. John D. Lantos, Steven H. Miles & Christine K. Cassel (1989). The Linares Affair. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (4):308-315.
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  32. Steven H. Miles (1989). Taking Hostages: The Linares Case. Hastings Center Report 19 (4):4-4.
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  33. Steven H. Miles (1987). Futile Feeding at the End of Life: Family Virtues and Treatment Decisions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (3):293-302.
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