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  1. Steven I. Miller & Frank Perino (2007). Race, Kinds and Ontological Commitments: Issues for Social Policy Clarification. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):1–15.
  2. Steven I. Miller (2006). Response-Dependence Theory and Empirical Claims for the Social Sciences. Metaphilosophy 37 (5):705-724.
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  3. Steven E. Tozer, Debra Miretzky, Steven I. Miller & Ronald R. Morgan (2000). Articles. Educational Studies 31 (2):106-131.
    Since publication of the 1986 Carnegie Commission report, A Nation Prepared: Teachers for the 21st Century, the professional teaching standards movement has gained noticeable momentum. The professional standards movement in teaching has been fueled by national organizations such as the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support Consortium, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, and by close collaboration among these four entities. Further, nearly all (...)
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  4. Steven I. Miller (1999). The Rationalitätstreit Revisited: A Note on Roth's "Methodological Pluralism". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (3):339-353.
    Roth's analysis of the Rationalitätstreit (i.e., the debate(s) about rationality) stands as one of the major works on how the debate affects a wide range of issues in the philosophy of science and the social sciences. His principal thesis is that the debate may be seen as a series of Quine-type "translation manuals," exhibiting characteristics of paradigms (following Kuhn 1970) that can be treated as testable scientific theories by adequate empirical tests. The author argues that Roth's notion of empirically testing (...)
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  5. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1997). Another View of Translation Manuals and the Study of Science. Synthese 113 (2):171-193.
    The article argues for the possibility of translation manuals having an implicit internal structure. This structure is composed of specific methodological assumptions and techniques. Using the (N)-type and (G)-type distinction developed by Fuller for the study of scientific behavior, it is shown that these are incomplete characterizations of translation manuals. A more complete characterization must involve an analysis of how the presence or absence of methodological rules influences the interpretation of specific research questions. It is further argued that while Quine's (...)
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  6. Steven I. Miller (1994). 'Evidence' as an Idealized Cognitive Model. Social Epistemology 8 (2):163 – 175.
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  7. Steven I. Miller (1992). The Qualitative Confirmation of Claims in Social Anthropology: An Application. Social Epistemology 6 (1):23 – 33.
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  8. Steven I. Miller & Janet Fredericks (1992). Clarifying the "Adequate Evidence Condition" in Educational Issues and Research: A Lakoffian View. Educational Theory 42 (4):461-472.
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  9. Sonia Ryang, Warren Schmaus, Steven I. Miller, Carl Matheson, Harold Brown, Govindan Parayil, Steven Yearley & Stephen Turner (1992). Taylor Ic Francis. London and Washington. Dc 0269-172bc1992) 6: 1-#. Social Epistemology 6:102.
     
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  10. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1991). A Case for "Qualitative Confirmation" for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):452-467.
    This paper attempts to clarify the meaning and significance of "qualitative confirmation". The need to do so is related to the fact that, without such a conceptualization, a large portion of the human sciences are relegated to a less than scientific status. Accordingly, "qualitative confirmation" is viewed as a proper subset of traditional confirmation theory. To establish such a case, a general Hempelian framework is utilized, but it is supplemented with two additional levels of confirmation. It is concluded that the (...)
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  11. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1991). Some Notes on the Nature of Methodological Indeterminacy. Synthese 88 (3):359 - 378.
    This paper is an attempt to extend the meaning of the concept of indeterminacy for the human sciences. The authors do this by coining the term methodological indeterminacy and arguing that indeterminacy is better understood when linked to specific methodological techniques. Paradoxically, while specific research techniques demonstrate that the issue of indeterminacy is complex, yielding the possibility of types and degrees, it does not eliminate the problem of translation first raised by Quine. However, the authors go on to argue that, (...)
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  12. Steven I. Miller & Janet Fredericks (1990). The False Ontology of School Climate Effects. Educational Theory 40 (3):333-342.
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  13. Steven I. Miller (1987). Some Comments on the Utility of Metaphors for Educational Theory and Practice. Educational Theory 37 (3):219-227.
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