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  1. Reed Maxwell, Steven Jay Lynn & Liam Condon (2015). Hypnosis, Hypnotic Suggestibility, Memory, and Involvement in Films. Consciousness and Cognition 33:170-184.
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  2. Joshua Knox & Steven Jay Lynn (2014). Sleep Experiences, Dissociation, Imaginal Experiences, and Schizotypy: The Role of Context. Consciousness and Cognition 23 (4):22-31.
    Watson reported moderate correlations between the Iowa Sleep Experience Survey and self-report measures of dissociation and schizotypy. Subsequent investigations reported similar, although somewhat more modest, correlations between the ISES and measures of dissociation and schizotypy, as well as with measures of absorption and negative affect. The present study tested subjects in conditions in which the measures of sleep experiences were administered with other measures in either the same or a different test context. We determined that sleep experiences were associated with (...)
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  3. Dalena van Heugten-van der Kloet, Harald Merckelbach & Steven Jay Lynn (2013). Dissociative Symptoms and REM Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):630-631.
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  4. Sean M. Barnes, Steven Jay Lynn & Ronald J. Pekala (2009). Not All Group Hypnotic Suggestibility Scales Are Created Equal: Individual Differences in Behavioral and Subjective Responses☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):255-265.
    To examine the influence of hypnotic suggestibility testing as a source of individual differences in hypnotic responsiveness, we compared behavioral and subjective responses on three scales of hypnotic suggestibility: The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A . Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility. Berlin: Consulting Psychologists Press); the Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale . The Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale: Normative data and psychometric properties. Psychological Reports, 53, 523–535); and the Group Scale of Hypnotic Ability . (...)
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  5. David Sloan Wilson & Steven Jay Lynn (2009). Adaptive Misbeliefs Are Pervasive, but the Case for Positive Illusions is Weak. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):539-540.
    It is a foundational prediction of evolutionary theory that human beliefs accurately approximate reality only insofar as accurate beliefs enhance fitness. Otherwise, adaptive misbeliefs will prevail. Unlike McKay & Dennett (M&D), we think that adaptive belief systems rely heavily upon misbeliefs. However, the case for positive illusions as an example of adaptive misbelief is weak.
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  6. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch & Josh Knox (2007). State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
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  7. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 145-165.
     
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  8. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Lilienfeld & O. Scott (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oup Oxford.
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  9. Judith Pintar & Steven Jay Lynn (2006). Social Incoherence and the Narrative Construction of Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):529-529.
    By shifting the focus of analysis from forgetting and remembering to interpreting and making-meaning, Erdelyi allows theoretical consideration of repression to move beyond the heuristic assumption that personal memory is necessarily private memory. In this commentary, repression is considered to be a collective process in which memories are shaped by the need for coherence between individual and social narratives.
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  10. Irving Kirsch & Steven Jay Lynn (2004). Hypnosis and Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):667-668.
    Although we are sympathetic to his central thesis about the illusion of will, having previously advanced a similar proposal, Wegner's account of hypnosis is flawed. Hypnotic behavior derives from specific suggestions that are given, rather than from the induction, of trance, and it can be observed in 90% of the population. Thus, it is very pertinent to the illusion of will. However, Wegner exaggerates the loss of subjective will in hypnosis.
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