41 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Steven Luper (Trinity University)
  1.  45
    Steven Luper (2009). The Philosophy of Death. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- Life -- Death -- Challenges -- Mortal harm -- The timing puzzle -- Killing -- Suicide and euthanasia -- Abortion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  2.  15
    Steven Luper (2014). Persimals. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (S1):140-162.
    What sort of thing, fundamentally, are you and I? For convenience, I use the term persimal to refer to the kind of thing we are, whatever that kind turns out to be. Accordingly, the question is, what are persimals? One possible answer is that persimalhood consists in being a human animal, but many theorists, including Derek Parfit and Jeff McMahan, not to mention John Locke, reject this idea in favor of a radically different view, according to which persimalhood consists in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Steven Luper, The Epistemic Closure Principle. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Most of us think we can always enlarge our knowledge base by accepting things that are entailed by (or logically implied by) things we know. The set of things we know is closed under entailment (or under deduction or logical implication), which means that we know that a given claim is true upon recognizing, and accepting thereby, that it follows from what we know. However, some theorists deny that knowledge is closed under entailment, and the issue remains controversial. The arguments (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4. Steven Luper (2006). Dretske on Knowledge Closure. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):379 – 394.
    In early essays and in more recent work, Fred Dretske argues against the closure of perception, perceptual knowledge, and knowledge itself. In this essay I review his case and suggest that, in a useful sense, perception is closed, and that, while perceptual knowledge is not closed under entailment, perceptually based knowledge is closed, and so is knowledge itself. On my approach, which emphasizes the safe indication account of knowledge, we can both perceive, and know, that sceptical scenarios (such as being (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  5.  89
    Steven Luper (2004). Posthumous Harm. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):63 - 72.
    According to Epicurus (1966a,b), neither death, nor anything that occurs later, can harm those who die, because people who die are not made to suffer as a result of either. In response, many philosophers (e.g., Nagel 1970, Feinberg 1984, and Pitcher 1984) have argued that Epicurus is wrong on both counts. They have defended the mortem thesis: death may harm those who die. They have also defended the post-mortem thesis: posthumous events may harm people who die. Their arguments for this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  6.  66
    Steven Luper (2007). Mortal Harm. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):239–251.
    The harm thesis says that death may harm the individual who dies. The posthumous harm thesis says that posthumous events may harm those who die. Epicurus rejects both theses, claiming that there is no subject who is harmed, no clear harm which is received, and no clear time when any harm is received. Feldman rescues the harm thesis with solutions to Epicurus' three puzzles based on his own version of the deprivation account of harm. But many critics, among them Lamont, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  7.  48
    Steven Luper, Death. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First, what constitutes a person's death? It is clear enough that people die when their lives end, but less clear what constitutes the ending of a person's life.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8. Steven Luper (2011). Surviving Death – Mark Johnston. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):884-887.
    This is a review of Johnston's book Surviving Death.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  88
    Steven Luper (2004). Epistemic Relativism. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):271–295.
    Epistemic relativism rejects the idea that claims can be assessed from a universally applicable, objective standpoint. It is greatly disdained because it suggests that the real ‘basis’ for our views is something fleeting, such as ‘‘the techniques of mass persuasion’’ (Thomas Kuhn 1970) or the determination of intellectuals to achieve ‘‘solidarity’’ (Rorty 1984) or ‘‘keep the conversation going’’ (Rorty 1979). But epistemic relativism, like skepticism, is far easier to despise than to convincingly refute, for two main reasons. First, its definition (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10.  17
    Steven Luper, Indiscernability Skepticism.
    Ideally, our account of knowledge would help us to understand the appeal of (and flaws in) skepticism,2 while remaining consistent with our ‘intuitions,' and supporting epistemic principles that seem eminently plausible. Of course, we don't always get what we want; we may not be able to move from intuitions and principles to an account that fully squares with them. As a last resort, we may have to move in the other direction, and give up intuitions or principles that are undermined (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. Steven Luper (1992). The Absurdity of Life. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52:1-17.
  12.  12
    Steven Luper (2007). Re-Reading: G.E. Moore, "Certainty" in His 'Philosophical Papers'. Philosophical Papers 36 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  42
    Steven Luper (2005). Past Desires and the Dead. Philosophical Studies 126 (3):331 - 345.
    I examine an argument that appears to take us from Parfit’s [Reasons and Persons, Oxford: Clarendon Press (1984)] thesis that we have no reason to fulfil desires we no longer care about to the conclusion that the effect of posthumous events on our desires is a matter of indifference (the post-mortem thesis). I suspect that many of Parfit’s readers, including Vorobej [Philosophical Studies 90 (1998) 305], think that he is committed to (something like) this reasoning, and that Parfit must therefore (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  43
    Steven Luper (2013). Exhausting Life. Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):99-119.
    Can we render death harmless to us by perfecting life, as the ancient Epicureans and Stoics seemed to think? It might seem so, for after we perfect life—assuming we can—persisting would not make life any better. Dying earlier rather than later would shorten life, but a longer perfect life is no better than a shorter perfect life, so dying would take nothing of value from us. However, after sketching what perfecting life might entail, I will argue that it is not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Steven Luper (ed.) (1987). The Possibility of Knowledge: Nozick and His Critics. Rowman & Littlefield.
  16.  19
    Steven Luper (2012). Contrastivism and Skepticism. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (1):51-58.
    Recently, Jonathan Schaffer has defended a contrastivist analysis of knowledge. By appealing to his account, he has attempted to steer a path between skepticism and Moore-style antiskepticism: much like sensitivity theorists and contextualists, he offers significant concessions to, but ultimately rejects, both. In this essay I suggest that in fact Schaffer ends up succumbing to skepticism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  44
    Steven Luper (2010). Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death – Christopher Belshaw. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):218-220.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  6
    Steven Luper (2014). Giving Your Life Meaning. The Philosophers' Magazine 66:44-48.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  6
    Steven Luper (2014). To the Death. The Philosophers' Magazine 64:125-126.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  11
    Steven Luper (1999). Natural Resources, Gadgets and Artificial Life. Environmental Values 8 (1):27 - 54.
    I classify different sorts of natural resources and suggest how these resources may be acquired. I also argue that inventions, whether gadgets or artificial life forms, should not be privately owned. Gadgets and life-forms are not created (although the term 'invention' suggests otherwise); they are discovered, and hence have much in common with more familiar natural resources such as sunlight that ought not to be privately owned. Nonetheless, inventors of gadgets, like discoverers of certain more familiar resources, sometimes should be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  21
    Steven Luper, Retroactive Harms and Wrongs.
    Despite its plausibility, I mean to resist this argument. I will reject premise 1 on the grounds that dying may be atemporally bad for us. I will also reject premise 3. Some postmortem events are bad for some of us while we are alive. But I am not going to report some new exotic particle that makes backwards causation possible. As far as I know, 6 is true. If an event is responsible for a harm that we incur before the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  36
    Steven Luper, The Skeptics—Introductory Essay by (Back to Homepage).
    ‘Skepticism’ refers primarily to two positions. Knowledge skepticism says there is no such thing as knowledge, and justification skepticism denies the existence of justified belief. How closely the two views are related depends on the relationship between knowledge and justification: if knowledge entails justified belief, as many theorists say, then justification skepticism entails knowledge skepticism (but not vice versa). Either form of skepticism can be limited in scope. Global (or radical) skepticism challenges the epistemic credentials of all beliefs, saying that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  6
    Steven Luper (2005). Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing, by Bede Rundle. Disputatio.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  19
    Steven Luper (2011). Living Up to Death. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):603-606.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  16
    Steven Luper (2009). Review of Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  14
    Steven Luper (2011). Review of Bernard Schumacher, Death and Mortality in Contemporary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  16
    Steven Luper (2007). Moore's Missing Principle. Philosophical Papers 36 (1):151-161.
    Philosophical Papers 36.1 (2007): 151-161.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  16
    Steven Luper (2007). The Easy Argument. Acta Analytica 22 (4):321 - 331.
    Suppose Ted is in an ordinary house in good viewing conditions and believes red, his table is red, entirely because he sees his table and its color; he also believes not-white, it is false that his table is white and illuminated by a red light, because not-white is entailed by red. The following three claims about this table case clash, but each seems plausible: 1. Ted’s epistemic position is strong enough for him to know red. 2. Ted cannot know not-white (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  14
    Steven Luper, The Main Project.
    The subject of this book is epistemology. Epistemology is the theory of knowledge, the study of the nature, sources, and limitations of knowledge and justification. In studying the nature of knowledge and justification, theorists typically try to delineate the conditions that must be met for a given person to know, or justifiably believe, that a given proposition is true. That is, they offer analyses of knowledge and justification. In this introduction, we will briefly describe the task of analysis, and review (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Steven Luper & Nicolas Bommarito (2011). Two Arguments for the Harmlessness of Death. In Michael Bruce Steven Barbone (ed.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 99--101.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Steven Luper (2011). Cartesian Skepticism. In Duncan Pritchard & Sven Bernecker (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Epistemology. Routledge 414--424.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. David Benatar, Margaret A. Boden, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor, Bruce N. Waller & Bernard Williams (eds.) (2010). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better to be immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Since Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions first appeared, David Benatar's distinctive anthology designed to introduce students to the key existential questions of philosophy has won a devoted following among users in a variety of upper-level and even introductory courses.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Steven Luper (ed.) (2014). Cambridge Companion to Life and Death. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume meets the increasing interest in a range of philosophical issues connected with the nature and significance of life and death, and the ethics of killing. What is it to be alive and to die? What is it to be a person? What must time be like if we are to persist? What makes one life better than another? May death or posthumous events harm the dead? The chapters in this volume address these questions, and also discuss topical issues (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Steven Luper (2011). Epicurus' Death is Nothing to Us Argument. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Steven Luper (ed.) (2003). Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Steven Luper (2003). 29. Indtscernability Skepticism. In Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman 285.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Steven Luper (2005). Past Desires and the Dead. Philosophical Studies 126 (3):331-345.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Steven Luper (2005). Review of Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing. [REVIEW] Disputatio 1:286-289.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Steven Luper (1999). Social Ideals and Policies Readings in Social and Political Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Steven Luper (ed.) (2014). The Cambridge Companion to Life and Death. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume meets the increasing interest in a range of philosophical issues connected with the nature and significance of life and death, and the ethics of killing. What is it to be alive and to die? What is it to be a person? What must time be like if we are to persist? What makes one life better than another? May death or posthumous events harm the dead? The chapters in this volume address these questions, and also discuss topical issues (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Steven Luper (2012). The Philosophy of Death. Cambridge University Press.
    The Philosophy of Death is a discussion of the basic philosophical issues concerning death, and a critical introduction to the relevant contemporary philosophical literature. Luper begins by addressing questions about those who die: What is it to be alive? What does it mean for you and me to exist? Under what conditions do we persist over time, and when do we perish? Next, he considers several questions concerning death, including: What does dying consist in; in particular, how does it differ (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography