26 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Steven M. Rosen (City University of New York)
  1. Steven M. Rosen (2013). Bridging the “Two Cultures”: Merleau-Ponty and the Crisis in Modern Physics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-12.
    This paper brings to light the significance of Merleau-Ponty’s thinking for contemporary physics. The point of departure is his 1956–57 Collège de France lectures on Nature, coupled with his reflections on the crisis in modern physics appearing in THE VISIBLE AND THE INVISIBLE. Developments in theoretical physics after his death are then explored and a deepening of the crisis is disclosed. The upshot is that physics’ intractable problems of uncertainty and subject-object interaction can only be addressed by shifting its philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Steven M. Rosen (2008). Quantum Gravity and Phenomenological Philosophy. Foundations of Physics 38 (6):556-582.
    The central thesis of this paper is that contemporary theoretical physics is grounded in philosophical presuppositions that make it difficult to effectively address the problems of subject-object interaction and discontinuity inherent to quantum gravity. The core objectivist assumption implicit in relativity theory and quantum mechanics is uncovered and we see that, in string theory, this assumption leads into contradiction. To address this challenge, a new philosophical foundation is proposed based on the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Martin Heidegger. Then, through (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Steven M. Rosen (2008). The Self-Evolving Cosmos: A Phenomenological Approach to Nature's Unity-in-Diversity. World Scientific Publishing, Series on Knots and Everything.
    This book addresses two significant and interrelated problems confronting modern theoretical physics: the unification of the forces of nature and the evolution of the universe. In bringing out the inadequacies of the prevailing approach to these questions, the need is demonstrated for more than just a new theory. The meanings of space and time themselves must be radically rethought, which requires a whole new philosophical foundation. To this end, we turn to the phenomenological writings of Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Steven M. Rosen (2006). Topologies of the Flesh: A Multidimensional Exploration of the Lifeworld. Ohio University Press, Series in Continental Thought.
    The concept of "the flesh" (la chair) derives from the writings of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. This was the word he used to name the concrete realm of sentient bodies and life processes that has been eclipsed by the abstractions of science, technology, and modern culture. Topology, to conventional understanding, is the branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the properties of geometric figures that stay the same when the figures are stretched or deformed. Topologies of the Flesh blends continental thought and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Steven M. Rosen & Michael Washburn (2006). Book Reviews-Topologies of the Flesh: A Multidimensional Exploration of the Lifeworld. Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3):351.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Steven M. Rosen (2005). Review of Processes and Boundaries of the Mind. [REVIEW] Semiotica 2005 (154 - 1/4):401-403.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Steven M. Rosen (2004). Dimensions of Apeiron: A Topological Phenomenology of Space, Time, and Individuation. Editions Rodopi, Value Inquiry Book Series.
    This book explores the evolution of space and time from the apeiron — the spaceless, timeless chaos of primordial nature. Here Western culture’s efforts to deny apeiron are examined, and we see the critical need now to lift the repression of the apeiron for the sake of human individuation.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Steven M. Rosen (2004). The Paradox of Apeiron. Network Review (86):3-6.
    This essay offers a broad historical exploration of the apeiron, the ancient principle of boundlessness and indeterminacy first brought to light by Anaximander in the 6th century BCE. Early Greek philosophy’s struggle with the apeiron and apeiron’s subsequent repression during the Renaissance and Enlightenment are noted. In the nineteenth century, apeiron is resurgent in science, art, and other fields—only to be repressed again with the early twentieth century rise of modernism. But with modernism's collapse into postmodernism, once again the apeiron (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Steven M. Rosen (2004). What is Radical Recursion? SEED Journal 4 (1):38-57.
    Recursion or self-reference is a key feature of contemporary research and writing in semiotics. The paper begins by focusing on the role of recursion in poststructuralism. It is suggested that much of what passes for recursion in this field is in fact not recursive all the way down. After the paradoxical meaning of radical recursion is adumbrated, topology is employed to provide some examples. The properties of the Moebius strip prove helpful in bringing out the dialectical nature of radical recursion. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Steven M. Rosen (2000). Focusing on the Flesh: Merleau-Ponty, Gendlin, and Lived Subjectivity. Lifwynn Correspondence 5 (1):1-14.
  11. Steven M. Rosen (1999). Evolution of Attentional Processes in the Human Organism. Group Analysis 32 (2):243-253.
    This article explores the evolution of human attention, focusing particularly on the phylogenetic and ontogenetic implications of the work of the American social psychiatrist Trigant Burrow. Attentional development is linked to the emergence of visual perspective, and this, in turn, is related to Burrow's notion of `ditention' (divided or partitive attention). Burrow's distinction between `ditention' and `cotention' (total organismic awareness) is examined, and, expanding on this, a threefold pattern of perceptual change is identified: prototention-->ditention-->cotention. Next, ditentive visual perspective is related (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Steven M. Rosen (1997). Wholeness as the Body of Paradox. Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (4):391-423.
    This essay is written at the crossroads of intuitive holism, as typified in Eastern thought, and the discursive reflectiveness more characteristic of the West. The point of departure is the age-old human need to overcome fragmentation and realize wholeness. Three basic tasks are set forth: to provide some new insight into the underlying obstacle to wholeness, to show what would be necessary for surmounting this blockage, and to take a concrete step in that direction. At the outset, the question of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Steven M. Rosen (1994). Science, Paradox, and the Moebius Principle: The Evolution of a "Transcultural" Approach to Wholeness. State University of New York Press; Series in Science, Technology, and Society.
    This book confronts basic anomalies in the foundations of contemporary science and philosophy. It deals with paradoxes that call into question our conventional way of thinking about space, time, and the nature of human experience.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Steven M. Rosen (1992). The Paradox of Mind and Matter: Utterly Different Yet One and the Same. In B. Rubik (ed.), The Interrelationship Between Mind and Matter. Center for Frontier Sciences Temple University.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Marlene A. Schiwy & Steven M. Rosen (1990). Spinning the Web of Life: Feminism, Ecology, and Christa Wolf. The Trumpeter 7 (1):16-26.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Steven M. Rosen (1988). A Neo-Intuitive Proposal for Kaluza-Klein Unification. Foundations of Physics 18 (11):1093-1139.
    This paper addresses a central question of contemporary theoretical physics: Can a unified account be provided for the known forces of nature? The issue is brought into focus by considering the recently revived Kaluza-Klein approach to unification, a program entailing dimensional transformation through cosmogony. First it is demonstrated that, in a certain sense, revitalized Kaluza-Klein theory appears to undermine the intuitive foundations of mathematical physics, but that this implicit consequence has been repressed at a substantial cost. A fundamental reformulation of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Steven M. Rosen (1986). On Whiteheadian Dualism: A Reply to Professor Griffin. Journal of Religion and Psychical Research 9 (1):11-17.
    In this article, the author defends his claim that a subtle form of metaphysical dualism can be found in Alfred North Whitehead's central notion of the "actual occasion." Rosen contends that phenomenological philosophers such as Martin Heidegger go further than Whitehead in challenging traditional dualism.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Steven M. Rosen (1986). Time and Higher-Order Wholeness: A Response to David Bohm. In David Ray Griffin (ed.), Physics and the Ultimate Significance of Time. State University of New York Press. 219--230.
    This paper explores the meaning of time from three points of view: (1) David Bohm's concepts of "vertical implicate order" and "holomovement"; (2) Alfred North Whitehead's idea of the "actual occasion"; and (3) the author's notion of "nondual duality." The author argues that Bohm and Whitehead alike implicitly divide time into dual and nondual aspects and that, in failing to adequately reconcile these, time, in effect, is denied. The alternative offered seeks to thoroughly integrate dual and nondual (holistic) modalities in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Steven M. Rosen (1983). Psi Modeling and the Psycho-Physical Problem: An Epistemological Crisis. Parapsychology Review 14 (1):17-24.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Steven M. Rosen (1983). The Concept of the Infinite and the Crisis in Modern Physics. Speculations in Science and Technology 6 (4):413-425.
    The basic thesis is that the problem of infinity underlies the current dilemma in modern theoretical physics. The traditional and set-theoretic conceptions of infinity are considered. It is demonstrated that standard mathematical analysis is dependent on the complete relativity of the infinite. In examining the domains of modern physics, infinity is found to lose its entirely relative character and, therefore, to be less amenable to classical analysis. Complementary aspects of microworld infinity are identified and are associated with the equivalent features (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Steven M. Rosen (1977). Toward a Representation of the "Irrepresentable&Quot;. In John W. White & Stanley Krippner (eds.), Future Science. Doubleday/Anchor.
  22. Steven M. Rosen (1976). Toward Relativization of Psychophysical "Relativity&Quot;. Perceptual and Motor Skills 42:843-850.
    A paradoxical feature of Weber's law is considered. The law presumably states a principle of psychophysical relativity, yet a pre-relativistic physical measurement model has been traditionally employed. Classical physics, Einsteinian relativity, and a newer interpretation of the relativity concept are discussed. Their relation to psychophysics is examined. The domain wherein Weber's law breaks down is noted as suggestively similar to that in which physicists report relativistic effects. A tentative hypothesis is offered to stimulate further thought about a more meaningful integration (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Steven M. Rosen (1975). Synsymmetry. Scientia (International Review of Scientific Synthesis) 110 (5-8):539-549.
    The violation of parity in weak interactions demonstrated in 1956 was an event that shook the foundations of physics. Since that time, the status of physical symmetry has been very much in doubt. The problem is presently addressed by first examining the essential relation between symmetry and asymmetry. Then, through the medium of qualitative mathematics, an attempt is made to show how these opposites may be fused in a topological structure expressing a new principle, that of "synsymmetry".
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Steven M. Rosen (1975). The Unity of Changelessness and Change: A Visual Geometry of World and Man. Main Currents in Modern Thought 31 (4):115-120.
    This paper examines the interplay of changelessness and change, being and becoming, from an historical and dialectical standpoint. Topological paradox is employed to elucidate the dynamic interweaving of these ontological opposites. The essay concludes by exploring the relevance of the dialectic to the question of human freedom.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Steven M. Rosen (1974). A Case of Non-Euclidean Visualization. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 5 (1):33-39.
  26. Steven M. Rosen (1973). A Plea for the Possibility of Visualizing Existence. Scientia (International Review of Scientific Synthesis) 108 (9-12):789-802.
    A dialectical, double-aspect model of general interaction is proposed as a means of visualizing existence. It is constructed from observation of the transformational properties of the Moebius surface, with hyperdimensional extrapolation to the Klein bottle. The interaction of systems is viewed as a process of circumversion (i.e. turning inside-out) whereby systems exchange relations, become mutually negated, then exchange identities. Interaction is discussed in the context of the PCT problem, symmetry, creation-annihilation, and uncertainty.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation