Search results for 'Steven Mulhall' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Steven Mulhall (1998). The Givenness of Grammar: A Reply to Steven Affeltd. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):32–44.
    The article contests Affeldt's critique of Mulhall's "Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary," by asking how deep the conflict between what Affeldt proposes as Cavell's account of Wittgenstein's notion of grammar and that of Baker and Hacker really goes. It argues that Affeldt's critique is successful against one interpretation of the claims that grammar consists of a framework of rules and that criteria function as a basis for judgment, but that other interpretations of these claims are available and (...)
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  2. Stephen Mulhall (2015). On Film. Routledge.
    In this significantly expanded new edition of his acclaimed exploration of the four _Alien_ movies, Stephen Mulhall adds several new chapters on Steven Spielberg’s _Mission: Impossible_ trilogy and _Minority Report_. The first part of the book discusses the four Alien movies. Mulhall argues that the sexual significance of the aliens themselves, and of Ripley’s resistance to them, takes us deep into the question of what it is to be human. At the heart of the book is a (...)
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  3. Stephen Mulhall (2008). On Film. Routledge.
    In this significantly expanded new edition of his acclaimed exploration of the four Alien movies, Stephen Mulhall adds several new chapters on Steven Spielberg’s Mission: Impossible trilogy and Minority Report . The first part of the book discusses the four Alien movies. Mulhall argues that the sexual significance of the aliens themselves, and of Ripley’s resistance to them, takes us deep into the question of what it is to be human. At the heart of the book is (...)
     
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  4. Stephen Mulhall (2015). On Film. Routledge.
    The first edition of Stephen Mulhall's acclaimed _On Film_ was a study of the four _Alien_ films, and made the highly original and controversial argument that films themselves can philosophise. In its second edition, _On Film_ increased its breadth and vision considerably to encompass films such as the _Mission: Impossible_ series and Steven Spielberg's _Minority Report_. In this significantly expanded third edition Stephen Mulhall adds new chapters on the Jason Bourne films, the fourth _Mission: Impossible_ movie, JJ (...)
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  5.  4
    Stephen Mulhall (1997). Constructing a Hall of Reflection: Stephen Mulhall. Philosophy 72 (280):219-239.
    Tom Phillips' painting for the dustjacket of the hardback edition of Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals depicts a faintly translucent, darkly-coloured, multi-layered lattice of letters, in which each character abuts directly upon others above, below and beside it, each overwrites or is overwritten by others of varying dimensions, but none is immediately decipherable as part of a word; and at the centre of this array is a geometrically precise, illuminated circle—perhaps emanating from a light located behind or under the (...)
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  6. Stephen Mulhall (2000). Misplacing Freedom, Displacing the Imagination: Cavell and Murdoch on the Fact/Value Distinction: Stephen Mulhall. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 47:255-277.
    The view that matters of fact and matters of value are categorically distinct, and that any credible account of ethics must begin from an acknowledgement of that distinction, has been a constant topic of debate in analytical moral philosophy throughout the twentieth century. It is not, however, as simple as it may at first appear to establish an uncontroversial articulation of the view under discussion, because in the course of the debate's evolution that view has been defined in a number (...)
     
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  7.  46
    Stephen Mulhall (2001). Inheritance and Originality: Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press.
    What does it mean to think of philosophy in the condition of modernism, in which its relation to its past and future has become a relevant problem? This book argues that the writings of Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Kierkegaard are best understood as responsive (each in their own way) to such questions. Through detailed analysis of these authors' most influential texts, Stephen Mulhall reorients our sense of the philosophical work each text aims to accomplish, engendering a critical dialogue between them (...)
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  8. Stephen Mulhall (2007). Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations, Sections 243-315. Oxford University Press.
    Stephen Mulhall offers a new way of interpreting one of the most famous and contested texts in modern philosophy: remarks on "private language" in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He sheds new light on a central controversy concerning Wittgenstein's early work by showing its relevance to a proper understanding of the later work.
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  9.  8
    Stephen Mulhall (1999). Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary. Clarendon Press.
    Stephen Mulhall presents the first full philosophical study of the work of Stanley Cavell. Cavell, a leading contemporary American thinker, is best known for his highly influential contributions to the fields of film studies, Shakespearian literary criticism, and the confluence of psychoanalysis and literary theory; Mulhall examines the broad spectrum of his thought, elucidating its essentially philosophical roots and trajectory.
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  10. Stephen Mulhall (2007). Philosophical Myths of the Fall. Princeton University Press.
    Did post-Enlightenment philosophers reject the idea of original sin and hence the view that life is a quest for redemption from it? In Philosophical Myths of the Fall, Stephen Mulhall identifies and evaluates a surprising ethical-religious dimension in the work of three highly influential philosophers--Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. He asks: Is the Christian idea of humanity as structurally flawed something that these three thinkers aim simply to criticize? Or do they, rather, end up by reproducing secular variants of the (...)
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  11.  4
    Stephen Mulhall (2013). The Self and its Shadows: A Book of Essays on Individuality as Negation in Philosophy and the Arts. OUP Oxford.
    Stephen Mulhall presents a series of multiply interrelated essays which explore the idea of selfhood as a matter of non-self-identity: for example, as becoming or self-overcoming, or as being doubled or divided. He draws on Nietzsche, Sartre, and Wittgenstein, but also on works of opera, cinema, and fiction.
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  12.  10
    Stephen Mulhall (2010). The Cat and the Camel a Hesitant Response to “Morality or Moralism?”. Common Knowledge 16 (2):331-338.
    This response to “Morality or Moralism?” by Émilie Hache and Bruno Latour, while accepting the plausibility and importance of their critique of moralism in the name of morality, identifies a number of questionable steps and assumptions in their development of it. Mulhall's response questions an ambiguity in their specifications of what morality and moralism are—an unexplained tendency on their part to occlude distinctively nonhuman animal life in favor of the inanimate when advocating a concern for the nonhuman, and what (...)
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  13.  9
    Stephen Mulhall (2004). Liberals and Communitarians: Whose Community? Which Individual? Think 3 (7):61.
    Stephen Mulhall explains and assesses some of the ‘communitarian’ criticisms of liberalism.
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  14.  3
    Stephen Mulhall (2003). Ways of Thinking: A Response to Andersen and Baggin. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).
    Nathan Andersen 'Is Film the Alien Other to Philosophy?: Philosophy *as* Film in Mulhall's _On Film_' _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 7 no. 23, August 2003 Julian Baggini 'Alien Ways of Thinking: Mulhall's _On Film_' _Film-Philosophy_, vol. 7 no. 24, August 2003.
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  15. Stephen Mulhall (2003). Inheritance and Originality. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What might it mean to think of philosophy as being in the condition of modernism -- in which its relation to its own past, and hence its sense of its own future, has become an undismissable problem? If philosophy's hitherto-defining conventions can neither be taken for granted nor rejected, they must be put in question -- which menans re-evealuating the relation between the form and content of philosophical writing, rethinking the demands that such writing must place on its readers, and (...)
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  16. Stephen Mulhall (2014). On Being in the World : Wittgenstein and Heidegger on Seeing Aspects. Routledge.
    _On Being in the World_, first published in 1990, illumines a neglected but important area of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, revealing its pertinence to the central concerns of contemporary analytic philosophy. The starting point is the idea of ‘continuous aspect perception’, which connects Wittgenstein’s treatment of certain issues relating to aesthetics with fundamental questions in the philosophy of psychology. Professor Mulhall indicates parallels between Wittgenstein’s interests and Heidegger’s _Being and Time_, demonstrating that Wittgenstein’s investigation of aspect perception is designed to cast (...)
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  17. Stephen Mulhall (2015). On Being in the World : Wittgenstein and Heidegger on Seeing Aspects. Routledge.
    _On Being in the World_, first published in 1990, illumines a neglected but important area of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, revealing its pertinence to the central concerns of contemporary analytic philosophy. The starting point is the idea of ‘continuous aspect perception’, which connects Wittgenstein’s treatment of certain issues relating to aesthetics with fundamental questions in the philosophy of psychology. Professor Mulhall indicates parallels between Wittgenstein’s interests and Heidegger’s _Being and Time_, demonstrating that Wittgenstein’s investigation of aspect perception is designed to cast (...)
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  18. Stephen Mulhall (2015). The Great Riddle: Wittgenstein and Nonsense, Theology and Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Can we talk meaningfully about God? The theological movement known as Grammatical Thomism affirms that religious language is nonsensical, because the reality of God is beyond our capacity for expression. Stephen Mulhall critically evaluates the claims of this movement to be a legitimate inheritor of Wittgenstein's philosophical methods as well as Aquinas's theological project. The major obstacle to this claim is that Grammatical Thomism makes the nonsensicality of religious language when applied to God a touchstone of Thomist insight, whereas (...)
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  19.  3
    Stephen Mulhall (2013). The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger's Being and Time. Routledge.
    The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time examines the work of one of the most controversial thinkers of the twentieth century. Heidegger’s writings are notoriously difficult, requiring careful reading. This book analyses his first major publication, Being and Time , which to this day remains his most influential work. The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time explores: The context of Heidegger’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, (...)
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  20. Stephen Mulhall (2013). The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger's Being and Time. Routledge.
    _The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time_ examines the work of one of the most controversial thinkers of the twentieth century. Heidegger’s writings are notoriously difficult, requiring careful reading. This book analyses his first major publication, _Being and Time_, which to this day remains his most influential work. The Routledge Guidebook to Heidegger’s Being and Time explores: The context of Heidegger’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings (...)
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  21. Stephen Mulhall (2016). The Self and its Shadows: A Book of Essays on Individuality as Negation in Philosophy and the Arts. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Stephen Mulhall presents a series of multiply interrelated essays which explore the idea of selfhood as a matter of non-self-identity: for example, as becoming or self-overcoming, or as being doubled or divided. He draws on Nietzsche, Sartre, and Wittgenstein, but also on works of opera, cinema, and fiction.
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  22. Stephen Mulhall (2007). Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Stephen Mulhall presents a detailed critical commentary on sections 243-315 of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: the famous remarks on 'private language'. In so doing, he makes detailed use of Stanley Cavell's interpretations of these remarks; and relates disputes about how to interpret this aspect of Wittgenstein's later philosophy to a recent, highly influential controversy about how to interpret Wittgenstein's early text, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, by drawing and testing out a distinction between resolute and substantial understandings of the related notions of (...)
     
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  23. Stephen Mulhall (2008). Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Stephen Mulhall offers a new way of interpreting one of the most famous and contested texts in modern philosophy: remarks on 'private language' in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. He sheds new light on a central controversy concerning Wittgenstein's early work by showing its relevance to a proper understanding of the later work.
     
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  24.  73
    Steven G. Affeldt (1998). The Ground of Mutuality: Criteria, Judgment and Intelligibility in Stephen Mulhall and Stanley Cavell. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):1–31.
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  25.  50
    Steven Hall (2008). Review of Stephen Mulhall, Wittgenstein's Private Language: Grammar, Nonsense, and Imagination in Philosophical Investigations §§243–315. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):272–280.
  26.  15
    Stephen Mulhall (1995). Book Review: Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2).
  27.  10
    Stephen Mulhall (1993). Consciousness, Cognition and the Phenomenal--II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 67 (67):75-89.
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  28. Denis McManus (ed.) (2014). Heidegger, Authenticity and the Self: Division Two of Being and Time. Routledge.
    Heidegger’s Being and Time is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last century. This outstanding collection examines the major themes of Division Two of Being and Time , which has received relatively little attention compared to Division One. Leading philosophers examine important topics such as authenticity, death, guilt and time, the influence of Kierkegaard, and the relationship between Heidegger’s work and ancient and medieval philosophy. Essential reading for scholars and students of Heidegger’s thought and (...)
     
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  29. Denis McManus (ed.) (2014). Heidegger, Authenticity and the Self: Themes From Division Two of Being and Time. Routledge.
    Though Heidegger’s Being and Time is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last hundred years, its Division Two has received relatively little attention. This outstanding collection corrects that, examining some of the central themes of Division Two and their wide-ranging and challenging implications. An international team of leading philosophers explore the crucial notions that articulate Heidegger’s concept of authenticity, including death, anxiety, conscience, guilt, resolution and temporality. In doing so, they clarify the bearing of (...)
     
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  30. Denis McManus (ed.) (2014). Heidegger, Authenticity, and the Self: Themes From Division Two of Being and Time. Routledge.
    Though Heidegger’s _Being and Time_ is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last hundred years, its Division Two has received relatively little attention. This outstanding collection corrects that, examining some of the central themes of Division Two and their wide-ranging and challenging implications. An international team of leading philosophers explore the crucial notions that articulate Heidegger’s concept of authenticity, including death, anxiety, conscience, guilt, resolution and temporality. In doing so, they clarify the bearing of (...)
     
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  31. Denis McManus (ed.) (2014). Heidegger, Authenticity, and the Self: Themes From Division Two of Being and Time. Routledge.
    Though Heidegger’s _Being and Time_ is often cited as one of the most important philosophical works of the last hundred years, its Division Two has received relatively little attention. This outstanding collection corrects that, examining some of the central themes of Division Two and their wide-ranging and challenging implications. An international team of leading philosophers explore the crucial notions that articulate Heidegger’s concept of authenticity, including death, anxiety, conscience, guilt, resolution and temporality. In doing so, they clarify the bearing of (...)
     
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  32.  7
    David Robjant (forthcoming). How Miserable We Are, How Wicked; Into the ‘Void’ with Murdoch, Mulhall, and Antonaccio. Heythrop Journal.
    Discussion of Iris Murdoch recalls Socrates' plea that he be allowed a crabwise approach to the Good. What his audience want of a direct approach is an explanation of precisely what sort of thing the Good is, where the demand for precision carries the force of: Tell me now, in which of the categories of thing I already allow to exist is the Good to be found? This is just what academia has done with the obscure singularity of Murdoch – (...)
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  33.  3
    Robert B. Talisse, Maureen Eckert, Norman Bowie, Steven M. Cahn, Randall Curren, Alan Goldman, Tziporah Kasachkoff, Peter Markie, John O'Connor, David Rosenthal, Robert Simon, David Shatz, George Sher, Douglas Stalker & Christine Vitrano (2009). A Teacher's Life: Essays for Steven M. Cahn. Lexington Books.
    This is a collection of 13 essays honoring Steven Cahn, presented to him on the occasion of his 25th year as Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York. The essays address issues concerning the teaching of philosophy, the responsibilities of professors, and the good life.
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  34.  51
    Gary Hatfield (1995). In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy by R. Steven Turner. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 86:664-665.
    Review of: R. Steven Turner, In the Eye's Mind: Vision and the Helmholtz-Hering Controversy. xiv + 338 pp., frontis., illus., figs., tables, bibl., index. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994.
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  35. David Goodman (1995). Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Intimations of Postmodernity (Routledge, 1992); Steven Seidman and David G. Wagner (Eds), Postmodernism and Social Theory (Blackwell, 1992); Stephen Crook, Jan Pakulski and Malcolm Wa Ters, Postmodernization: Change in Advanced Society (Sage Publica Tions, 1992); Gianni Vattimo, The End of Modernity—Nihilism and Hermeneutics in Post-Modern Culture (Polity Press, 1988). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 40 (1):138-146.
    Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Intimations of Postmodernity ; Steven Seidman and David G. Wagner , Postmodernism and Social Theory ; Stephen Crook, Jan Pakulski and Malcolm Wa ters, Postmodernization: Change in Advanced Society ; Gianni Vattimo, The End of Modernity—Nihilism and Hermeneutics in Post-modern Culture.
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  36.  55
    Howard Sankey (2014). On Relativism and Pluralism: Response to Steven Bland. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:98-103.
    This paper responds to criticism presented by Steven Bland of my naturalistic approach to epistemic relativism. In my view, the central argument for epistemic relativism derives from the Pyrrhonian problem of the criterion. This opens relativism to an anti-sceptical response. I combine Roderick Chisholm’s particularist response to the problem of the criterion with a reliabilist conception of epistemic warrant. A distinction is made between epistemic norms which provide genuine warrant and those which do not. On the basis of this (...)
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  37.  4
    Max Loxterkamp (2016). Morality, Objective Value and Living a Meaningful Life: A Reply to Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano's Essay ‘Living Well’. Think 15 (43):117-123.
    In their essay, Steven M. Cahn and Christine Vitrano argue that to live a meaningful life all we must do is find personal satisfaction and enjoyment. They argue against other philosophers who claim that activities are what make a life meaningful. There are two problems with what they argue in the essay. The first relates to a particular criticism they make of some of those philosophers taking the contrary view, in regards to the difficulty those philosophers have in (...)
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  38.  9
    Inga Römer (2014). Steven Crowell: Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger. Husserl Studies 30 (3):283-291.
    In seinem neuen Buch vertieft Steven Crowell seine Auffassung der Phänomenologie als Transzendentalphilosophie, die es mit dem normativen Raum des Sinnes (space of meaning) zu tun habe (vgl. Crowell 2001). Sowohl Husserl als auch Heidegger führen aus seiner Sicht innerhalb der Phänomenologie die kantische Tradition der Transzendentalphilosophie weiter, indem sie der Frage nach den „transzendentalen Bedingungen der Konstitution oder Enthüllung des Sinnes“ (S. 1) nachgehen.Vgl. auch den von Steven Crowell mit herausgegebenen Band Transcendental Heidegger (2007). Da der Sinn (...)
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  39.  29
    Steven Pinker (2002). Steven Pinker. Cognitive Science 1991 (1996).
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  40.  16
    Arne Rasmusson (2012). Science as Salvation: George Lakoff and Steven Pinker as Secular Political Theologians. Modern Theology 28 (2):197-228.
    This article critically analyzes two leading cognitive scientists, George Lakoff and Steven Pinker, as competing secular political “theologians”. The idea of Science as savior is at the heart of the set of stories modernity tells about itself. The modern world, it is assumed, has left the age of religion and reached the age of Science. Lakoff and Pinker, who advocate opposing moral and political worldviews, make their claims on the basis of their scientific work, but it is implicit narratives (...)
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  41.  46
    Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such (...)
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  42.  17
    Steven Miller (1992). Steven Miller. Social Epistemology 6 (1):23-33.
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  43.  1
    Victor Forte (2016). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who (...)
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  44.  66
    Don Howard, Are Elementary Particles Individuals? A Critical Appreciation of Steven French and Décio Krause's Identity in Physics: A Historical, Philosophical, and Formal Analysis.
    Steven French and Décio Krause have written what bids fair to be, for years to come, the definitive philosophical treatment of the problem of the individuality of elementary particles in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. The book begins with a long and dense argument for the view that elementary particles are most helpfully regarded as non-individuals, and it concludes with an earnest attempt to develop a formal apparatus for describing such non-individual entities better suited to the task than (...)
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  45.  1
    Donald Evans (1989). Can Philosophers Limit What Mystics Can Do? A Critique of Steven Katz: Donald Evans. Religious Studies 25 (1):53-60.
    Some philosophers such as Ninian Smart have claimed that mystics from different religious traditions may sometimes have the same experience , while nevertheless giving different and tradition-bound descriptive reports of that experience. In two important essays, Steven Katz has challenged such a claim. Mystics from different religious traditions do not have the same experience.
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  46.  13
    Jacob Rump (2014). Steven Crowell: Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):479-485.
    Steven Crowell’s book is a welcome addition to the literature in phenomenology as well as a demonstration of the importance of phenomenology for those working in other areas of contemporary philosophy, especially those areas of Anglo-American philosophy concerned with normativity, meaning and the philosophy of action. Through a series of thirteen independent but thematically linked essays, he offers a novel account of the importance of normativity to phenomenology, a carefully argued re-thinking of the Husserlian and early Heideggerian accounts (...)
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  47.  26
    Selmer Bringsjord (2001). Are We Evolved Computers?: A Critical Review of Steven Pinker's How the Mind Works. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):227 – 243.
    Steven Pinker's How the mind works (HTMW) marks in my opinion an historic point in the history of humankind's attempt to understand itself. Socrates delivered his "know thyself" imperative rather long ago, and now, finally, in this behemoth of a book, published at the dawn of a new millennium, Pinker steps up to have psychology tell us what we are: computers crafted by evolution - end of story; mystery solved; and the poor philosophers, having never managed to obey Socrates' (...)
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  48.  16
    Nathan Andersen (2003). Is Film the Alien Other to Philosophy?, on Stephen Mulhall On Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).
    Stephen Mulhall _On Film_ London and New York: Routledge, 2002 ISBN 0-415-24796-9 142 pp.
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  49.  21
    David Robjant (2013). Symposium on Iris Murdoch. How Miserable We Are, How Wicked; Into the ‘Void’ with Murdoch, Mulhall, and Antonaccio. Heythrop Journal 54 (6):999-1006.
    Murdoch brings together the darkness of misery and the darkness of wickedness under the observation that ‘goodness is not acontinuously active organic part of our purposes and wishes’. This looks like an empirically minded correction of Socrates. But besides correcting Socrates, is Murdoch also offering, as Stephen Mulhall suggests, ‘a fundamental counter-example’ to her own ‘moral vision’? This depends on what one takes Murdoch’s moral vision to be. I trace Mulhall's mistake to Maria Antonaccio's misidentification of the good (...)
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  50.  17
    John Sarnecki & Matthew Sponheimer (2002). Why Neanderthals Hate Poetry: A Critical Notice of Steven Mithen's the Prehistory of Mind. Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):173 – 184.
    The significance of historical advances in human development has been widely debated within cognitive science. Steven Mithen's recent book, The prehistory of mind (London: Thames & Hudson, 1996), presents an archeologist's attempt to explain the details of cognitive development within the framework of modern anthropology and cognitive psychology. We argue that Mithen's attempt fails for a number of different reasons. The relationship between the archeological evidence he considers and his conclusions is problematic. We maintain that it is difficult to (...)
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