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Steven Nadler [112]Steven M. Nadler [42]
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Profile: Steven Nadler (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
  1. Steven Nadler (1994). Choosing a Theodicy: The Leibniz-Malebranche-Arnauld Connection. Journal of the History of Ideas 55:573-589.
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  2.  34
    Steven M. Nadler (2006). Spinoza's Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Spinoza's Ethics is one of the most remarkable, important, and difficult books in the history of philosophy: a treatise simultaneously on metaphysics, knowledge, philosophical psychology, moral philosophy, and political philosophy. It presents, in Spinoza's famous 'geometric method', his radical views on God, Nature, the human being, and happiness. In this wide-ranging introduction to the work, Steven Nadler explains the doctrines and arguments of the Ethics, and shows why Spinoza's endlessly fascinating ideas may have been so troubling to his contemporaries, as (...)
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  3.  4
    Steven Nadler (forthcoming). Spinoza Ou L’« Athée Vertueux ». British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  4.  43
    Steven M. Nadler (2011). Occasionalism: Causation Among the Cartesians. Oxford University Press.
    These essays examine the philosophical, scientific, theological and religious themes and arguments of occasionalism, as well as its roots in medieval views on ...
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  5. Steven Nadler (2008). Spinoza and Consciousness. Mind 117 (467):575-601.
    Most discussions of Spinoza and consciousness—and there are not many— conclude either that he does not have an account of consciousness, or that he does have one but that it is at best confused, at worst hopeless. I argue, in fact, that people have been looking in the wrong place for Spinoza's account of consciousness, namely, at his doctrine of "ideas of ideas". Indeed, Spinoza offers the possibility of a fairly sophisticated, naturalistic account of consciousness, one that grounds it in (...)
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  6. Steven M. Nadler (ed.) (2000). The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. Cambridge University Press.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicolas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with religious Platonism. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory of causality, his philosophical theology, (...)
     
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  7. Steven Nadler (1999). Spinoza a Life. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Baruch Spinoza was one of the most important philosophers of all time; he was also arguably the most radical and controversial. This was the first complete biography of Spinoza in any language and is based on detailed archival research. More than simply recounting the story of Spinoza's life, the book takes the reader right into the heart of Jewish Amsterdam in the seventeenth century and, with Spinoza's exile from Judaism, right into the midst of the tumultuous political, social, intellectual and (...)
     
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  8. Steven M. Nadler (1990). Deduction, Confirmation, and the Laws of Nature in Descartes's Principia Philosophiae. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):359-383.
  9.  15
    Steven Nadler (2015). Spinoza on Lying and Suicide. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):257-278.
    Spinoza is often taken to claim that suicide is never a rational act, that a ‘free’ person acting by the guidance of reason will never terminate his/her own existence. Spinoza also defends the prima facie counterintuitive claim that the rational person will never act dishonestly. This second claim can, in fact, be justified when Spinoza's moral psychology and account of motivation are properly understood. Moreover, making sense of the free man's exception-less honesty in this way also helps to clarify how (...)
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  10.  93
    Steven M. Nadler (1993). Occasionalism and General Will in Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):31-47.
    This paper examines a common misreading of the mechanics of Malebranche's doctrine of divine causal agency, occasionalism, and its roots in a related misreading of Malebranche's theories. God, contrary to this misreading, is for Malebranche constantly and actively causally engaged in the world, and does not just establish certain laws of nature. The key is in understanding just what Malebranche means by general volitions'.
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  11. Steven Nadler (2008). Whatever is, is God" : Substance and Things in Spinoza's Metaphysics. In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press
     
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  12.  1
    Steven M. Nadler (1992). Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas. Philosophical Review 101 (3):644-647.
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  13. Steven Nadler (ed.) (1993). Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. Penn State University Press.
  14.  8
    Steven M. Nadler (1992). Malebranche and Ideas. Oxford University Press.
    Nicolas Malebranche's account of the nature of ideas and their role in knowledge and perception has been greatly misunderstood by both his critics and commentators. In this work, Nadler examines Malebranche's theory of ideas and the doctrine of the vision in God with the aim of replacing the standard interpretation of Malebranche's account with a new reading. He argues that Malebranche's ideas should be seen as essences or logical concepts, and that our apprehension of them is thus of a purely (...)
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  15.  27
    Steven Nadler (1994). Descartes and Occasional Causation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (1):35 – 54.
    After a brief analysis of the nature of occasional causation, distinguishing it from both efficient causation and the doctrine of occasionalism, it is argued that this model of causation informs Descartes' account of the generation of sensory ideas in the mind. It is further argued that, consequently, Descartes is not an occasionalist on this matter.
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  16.  28
    Steven M. Nadler (1995). Malebranche's Occasionalism: A Reply to Clarke. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):505-508.
  17.  25
    Steven Nadler (1996). “No Necessary Connection”. The Monist 79 (3):448-466.
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  18.  21
    Steven Nadler (2008). Arnauld's God. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 517-538.
    In this paper, I argue that Arnauld’s conception of God is more radical than scholars have been willing to allow. It is not the case that, for Arnauld, God acts for reasons, with His will guided by wisdom (much as the God of Malebranche and Leibniz acts), albeit by a wisdom impenetrable to us. Arnauld’s objections to Malebranche are directed not only at the claim that God’s wisdom is transparent to human reason, but at the whole distinction between will and (...)
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  19. Steven M. Nadler (1990). Deduction, Confirmation, and the Laws of Nature in Descartes's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3).
  20.  39
    Steven M. Nadler (1998). Louis de la Forge and the Development of Occasionalism: Continuous Creation and the Activity of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):215-231.
    Louis de La Forge and the Development of Occasionalism: Continuous Creation and the Activity of the Soul STEVEN NADLER THE DOCTRINE OF DIVINE CONSERVATION is a dangerous one. It is not theologi- cally dangerous, at least not in itself. From the thirteenth century onwards, and particularly with the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas, the notion of the continuous divine sustenance of the world of created things was, if not univer- sally accepted, a nonetheless common feature of theological orthodoxy, Chris- tian (...)
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  21.  6
    Steven M. Nadler (2001). Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Why was the great philosopher Spinoza expelled from his Portuguese-Jewish community in Amsterdam? Nadler's investigation of this simple question gives fascinating new perspectives on Spinoza's thought and the Jewish religious and philosophical tradition from which it arose.
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  22.  12
    Steven Nadler (1991). Daisie Radner and Michael Radner: Animal Consciousness. Environmental Ethics 13 (2):187-191.
  23.  19
    Steven Nadler, Baruch Spinoza. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  24.  18
    Steven Nadler (1999). Knowledge, Volitional Agency and Causation in Malebranche and Geulincx. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):263 – 274.
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  25.  10
    Steven M. Nadler (1988). Arnauld, Descartes, and Transubstantiation: Reconciling Cartesian Metaphysics and Real Presence. Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (2):229.
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  26.  36
    Steven Nadler (2002). Eternity and Immortality in Spinoza's Ethics. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):224–244.
  27.  1
    Steven Nadler (2000). 5 Malebranche on Causation. In Steven M. Nadler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. Cambridge University Press 112.
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  28. Steven M. Nadler (ed.) (1992). Causation in Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony. Penn State University Press.
    Three general accounts of causation stand out in early modern philosophy: Cartesian interactionism, occasionalism, and Leibniz's preestablished harmony. The contributors to this volume examine these theories in their philosophical and historical context. They address them both as a means for answering specific questions regarding causal relations and in their relation to one another, in particular, comparing occasionalism and the preestablished harmony as responses to Descartes's metaphysics and physics and the Cartesian account of causation. Philosophers discussed include Descartes, Gassendi, Malebranche, Arnauld, (...)
     
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  29.  57
    Steven Nadler (2003). Review: The Science of Conjecture. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (447):539-542.
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  30.  9
    Steven Nadler (1996). Descartes: An Intellectual Biography by Stephen Gaukroger. Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):101-104.
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  31.  45
    Steven Nadler (2011). From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):947-950.
  32.  8
    Steven M. Nadler (1988). Review. [REVIEW] Synthese 77 (3):409-413.
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  33.  34
    Steven M. Nadler (1990). Berkeley's Ideas and the Primary/Secondary Distinction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):47-61.
  34.  7
    Steven Nadler (2012). Un libro forjado en el infierno. Ideas Y Valores 61 (150).
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  35.  17
    Steven Nadler (2015). Baruch Spinoza’s Ethica. Topoi 34 (2):549-552.
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  36.  11
    Steven M. Nadler (1998). Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):321-322.
  37.  6
    Steven Nadler (1990). The Breakdown of Cartesian Metaphysics. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):153-154.
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  38.  8
    Steven Nadler (2013). Scripture and Truth: A Problem in Spinoza's Tractatus Theologico-Politicus. Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (4):623-642.
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  39.  21
    Steven Nadler (2012). The Vatican Manuscript of Spinoza's Ethica (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):295-296.
  40.  26
    Steven M. Nadler (1987). Scientific Certainty and the Creation of the Eternal Truths: A Problem in Descartes. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):175-192.
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  41.  10
    Steven M. Nadler (1992). Antoine Arnauld: On True and False Ideas, And: Antoine Arnauld: On True and False Ideas: New Objections to Descartes' Meditations and Descartes' Replies. Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (1):140-143.
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  42.  8
    Steven Nadler (1985). Probability and Truth in the Apology. Philosophy and Literature 9 (2):198-202.
    This article is a reply to an earlier piece by kenneth seeskin (philosophy and literature, 1982). I argue that socrates' defense is more of a parody of gorgian rhetoric than seeskin is willing to allow. They key lies in socrates' use of rhetoric to persuade the beliefs of the athenian jurors by means of probabilities. When replying to the expressed pretexts of the trial, He uses "base" rhetoric; when finally attending to the real reasons behind his accusations, He resorts to (...)
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  43. Steven Nadler (1998). Doctrines of Explanation in Late Scholasticism and in the Mechanical Philosophy. In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 2--513.
     
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  44.  4
    Steven M. Nadler (1997). The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza, And: Spinoza: The Letters. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):140-142.
  45.  4
    Steven M. Nadler (1998). Descartes and Augustine. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):625-627.
  46.  15
    Steven Nadler (1988). Cartesianism and Port-Royal. The Monist 71 (4):573-584.
    Contrary to what appears to be popular belief, Port-Royal was not a bastion of cartesianism. In fact, Of all the port-Royalists of the seventeenth century, Only arnauld can be considered a cartesian in any interesting sense. Most of the others associated with the order were hostile to the new philosophy and actively campaigned against it, Believing it to pose a threat to piety and "true" religion. This can be seen by examining the writings of de sacy, Du vaucel, And nicole, (...)
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  47.  20
    Steven M. Nadler (1997). Descartes's Demon and the Madness of Don Quixote. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (1):41-55.
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  48. Steven Nadler (1997). Occasionalism and the Mind-Body Problem. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Clarendon Press
  49.  7
    Steven M. Nadler (1997). Representational Ideas: From Plato to Patricia Churchland. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (3):477-480.
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  50.  24
    Steven M. Nadler (2005). Cordemoy and Occasionalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):37-54.
    This is an examination of the nature and extent of Cordemoy's commitment to the doctrine of occasionalism.
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