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  1. Steven Ravett Brown, Must Phenomenology Rest on Paradox?
    Husserl made certain assumptions about the nature of the components of experienced phenomena derived from and similar to the assumptions of the psychologists of his time. I will present some of those assumptions, and argue, and support that argument with evidence, that they are incorrect. I claim that if that is true, then Husserlian methodology is flawed, to the extent that for certain investigations both the epoch? and the method of eidetic variation necessitate circularity which invalidates their utility. These arguments (...)
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  2. Steven Ravett Brown (2009). Reentrant emergence. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):225 - 238.
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  3. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). On the Mechanism of the Generation of Aesthetic Ideas in Kant's Critique of Judgment. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):487 – 499.
  4. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). Structural Phenomenology: An Empirically-Based Model of Consciousness. Dissertation, University of Oregon
    In this dissertation I develop a structural model of phenomenal consciousness that integrates contemporary experimental and theoretical work in philosophy and cognitive science. I argue that phenomenology must be “naturalized” and that it should be acknowledged as a major component of empirical research. I use this model to describe important phenomenal structures, and I then employ it to provide a detailed explication of tip-of-tongue phenomena. The primary aim of “structural phenomenology” is the creation of a general framework within which descriptions (...)
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  5. Steven Ravett Brown, Structural Phenomenology: A Top-Down Analytic Methodology.
    Gurwitsch, following Husserl, described two structural parameters applicable to all phenomena: the intensity of our experiences, and their salience, i.e., their experienced relevance to other entities in consciousness. These dimensions subsume experiences within structures indicating the degree of attention consciously paid to phenomena, and their significance to other phenomena experienced simultaneously. For example, the recession to or from unconsciousness of mental contents may be described by the variation of their saliences and intensities. The focal organization implied by these dimensions gives (...)
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  6. Laurent Auclair, Jodie A. Baird, Kati Balog, Iris R. Bell, Marcia Bernstein, John Bickle, Steven Ravett Brown, Peter Cariani, Wallace Chafe & Ziya V. Dikman (2000). Alkire, MT, 370. Consciousness and Cognition 9:639.
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  7. Steven Ravett Brown (2000). A Comment on the Mechanism of the Generation of Aesthetic Ideas in Kant's Critique of Judgment. [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press).
    In Kant's Critique of Judgment (CJ), the actual mechanism of the construction of aesthetic ideas is only briefly sketched. I suggest that there may be a connection between certain aspects of Sections 49 and 59, such that the creation of aesthetic ideas can be related to the process of "symbolic hypotyposis" (¤59.2). I will argue that the process of symbolic hypotyposis relates to the formation of aesthetic attributes, as symbols, through an analogical process; that a symbol acts, in effect, as (...)
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  8. Steven Ravett Brown (2000). Peirce and Formalization of Thought: The Chinese Room Argument. Journal of Mind and Behavior.
    Whether human thinking can be formalized and whether machines can think in a human sense are questions that have been addressed by both Peirce and Searle. Peirce came to roughly the same conclusion as Searle, that the digital computer would not be able to perform human thinking or possess human understanding. However, his rationale and Searle's differ on several important points. Searle approaches the problem from the standpoint of traditional analytic philosophy, where the strict separation of syntax and semantics renders (...)
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  9. Steven Ravett Brown (2000). Reply to Bruce Mangan's Commentary on “What Feeling Is the 'Feeling of Knowing?'”. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):545-549.
  10. Peter Cariani, Steven Ravett Brown, M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). David LaBerge, Laurent Auclair, and Eric Sieroff. Preparatory Attention: Experiment and Theory. Consciousness and Cognition 9:145.
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  11. Steven Ravett Brown (1999). Beyond the Fringe: James, Gurwitsch, and the Conscious Horizon. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 20 (2):211-227.
    All our conscious experiences, linguistic and nonlinguistic, are bound up with and dependent on a background that is vague, unexpressed, and sometimes unconscious. The combination of William JamesÕs concept of "fringes" coupled with Aaron GurwitschÕs analysis of the field of consciousness provides a general structure in which to embed phenomenal descriptions, enabling fringe phenomena to be understood, in part, relative to other experiences. I will argue, drawing on examples from Drew LederÕs book, The Absent Body, that specific and detailed phenomena (...)
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  12. Marianne Hammerl, Andy P. Field, Benjamin Libet, Peter Cariani & Steven Ravett Brown (1999). John P. Kline, Gary E. Schwartz, Ziya V. Dikman, and Iris R. Bell. Electroencephalographic Regis. Consciousness and Cognition 8:585.
     
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