Search results for 'Stimulation' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys (2015). Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Lived Experience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients. PLoS ONE 10 (8):1-29.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a relatively new, experimental treatment for patients suffering from treatment-refractory Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The effects of treatment are typically assessed with psychopathological scales that measure the amount of symptoms. However, clinical experience indicates that the effects of DBS are not limited to symptoms only: patients for instance report changes in perception, feeling stronger and more confident, and doing things unreflectively. Our aim is to get a better overview of the whole variety of changes (...)
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  2.  69
    Felicitas Kraemer (2013). Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation. Neuroethics 6 (3):483-497.
    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In particular, (...)
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  3.  45
    Karsten Witt, Jens Kuhn, Lars Timmermann, Mateusz Zurowski & Christiane Woopen (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation and the Search for Identity. Neuroethics 6 (3):499-511.
    Ethical evaluation of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease is complicated by results that can be described as involving changes in the patient’s identity. The risk of becoming another person following surgery is alarming for patients, caregivers and clinicians alike. It is one of the most urgent conceptual and ethical problems facing deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease at this time. In our paper we take issue with this problem on two accounts. First, we elucidate (...)
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  4.  78
    Françoise Baylis (2013). “I Am Who I Am”: On the Perceived Threats to Personal Identity From Deep Brain Stimulation. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (3):513-526.
    This article explores the notion of the dislocated self following deep brain stimulation (DBS) and concludes that when personal identity is understood in dynamic, narrative, and relational terms, the claim that DBS is a threat to personal identity is deeply problematic. While DBS may result in profound changes in behaviour, mood and cognition (characteristics closely linked to personality), it is not helpful to characterize DBS as threatening to personal identity insofar as this claim is either false, misdirected or trivially (...)
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  5.  60
    Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys (2013). The Phenomenology of Deep Brain Stimulation-Induced Changes in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients: An Enactive Affordance-Based Model. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:1-14.
    People suffering from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) do things they do not want to do, and/or they think things they do not want to think. In about 10 percent of OCD patients, none of the available treatment options is effective. A small group of these patients is currently being treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Deep brain stimulation involves the implantation of electrodes in the brain. These electrodes give a continuous electrical pulse to the brain area in which they (...)
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  6.  53
    Maartje Schermer (2013). Health, Happiness and Human Enhancement—Dealing with Unexpected Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 6 (3):435-445.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a treatment involving the implantation of electrodes into the brain. Presently, it is used for neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease, but indications are expanding to psychiatric disorders such as depression, addiction and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Theoretically, it may be possible to use DBS for the enhancement of various mental functions. This article discusses a case of an OCD patient who felt very happy with the DBS treatment, even though her symptoms were not reduced. (...)
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  7.  37
    Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld & Damiaan Denys (2014). Stimulating Good Practice - What an Embodied Cognition Approach Could Mean for Deep Brain Stimulation Practice. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4).
    We whole-heartedly agree with Mecacci and Haselager(2014) on the need to investigate the psychosocial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), and particularly to find out how to prevent adverse psychosocial effects. We also agree with the authors on the value of an embodied, embedded, enactive approach (EEC) to the self and the mind–brain problem. However, we do not think this value primarily lies in dissolving a so-called “maladaptation” of patients to their DBS device. In this comment, we challenge three (...)
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  8.  30
    Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and (...)
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  9.  20
    Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: (...)
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  10.  51
    Nir Lipsman & Walter Glannon (2013). Brain, Mind and Machine: What Are the Implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for Perceptions of Personal Identity, Agency and Free Will? Bioethics 27 (9):465-470.
    Brain implants, such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which are designed to improve motor, mood and behavioural pathology, present unique challenges to our understanding of identity, agency and free will. This is because these devices can have visible effects on persons' physical and psychological properties yet are essentially undetectable when operating correctly. They can supplement and compensate for one's inherent abilities and faculties when they are compromised by neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, unlike talk therapy or pharmacological treatments, patients need not (...)
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  11.  10
    Frederic Gilbert (2015). Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation. Neuroethics 8 (2):107-114.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials. A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to (...)
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  12.  11
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro & Haluk Ogmen (2004). A Comparison of Masking by Visual and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Implications for the Study of Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):829-843.
    Visual stimuli as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used: to suppress the visibility of a target and to recover the visibility of a target that has been suppressed by another mask. Both types of stimulation thus provide useful methods for studying the microgenesis of object perception. We first review evidence of similarities between the processes by which a TMS mask and a visual mask can either suppress the visibility of targets or recover such suppressed visibility. However, (...)
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  13.  29
    Farah Focquaert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making. Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) (...)
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  14.  11
    Hannah Maslen, Jonathan Pugh & Julian Savulescu (2015). The Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa. Neuroethics 8 (3):215-230.
    There is preliminary evidence, from case reports and investigational studies, to suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation could be used to treat some patients with Anorexia Nervosa. Although this research is at an early stage, the invasive nature of the intervention and the vulnerability of the potential patients are such that anticipatory ethical analysis is warranted. In this paper, we first show how different treatment mechanisms raise different philosophical and ethical questions. We distinguish three potential mechanisms alluded to in the (...)
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  15.  21
    Veronica Johansson, Martin Garwicz, Martin Kanje, Helena Röcklinsberg, Jens Schouenborg, Anders Tingström & Ulf Görman (2013). Beyond Blind Optimism and Unfounded Fears: Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression. Neuroethics 6 (3):457-471.
    The introduction of new medical treatments based on invasive technologies has often been surrounded by both hopes and fears. Hope, since a new intervention can create new opportunities either in terms of providing a cure for the disease or impairment at hand; or as alleviation of symptoms. Fear, since an invasive treatment involving implanting a medical device can result in unknown complications such as hardware failure and undesirable medical consequences. However, hopes and fears may also arise due to the cultural (...)
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  16.  12
    Daniel A. Pollen (2004). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times (...)
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  17.  19
    Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities and (...)
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  18.  18
    Grant Gillett (2011). The Gold-Plated Leucotomy Standard and Deep Brain Stimulation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):35-44.
    Walter Freeman, the self styled neurosurgeon, became famous (or infamous) for psychosurgery. The operation of frontal leucotomy swept through the world (with Freeman himself performing something like 18,000 cases) but it has tainted the whole idea of psychosurgery down to the present era. Modes of psychosurgery such as Deep Brain Stimulation and other highly selective neurosurgical procedures for neurological and psychiatric conditions are in ever-increasing use in current practice. The new, more exciting techniques are based in a widely held (...)
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  19.  13
    Roy Dings & Leon de Bruin (2016). Situating the Self: Understanding the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):151-165.
    The article proposes a theoretical model to account for changes in self due to Deep Brain Stimulation. First, we argue that most existing models postulate a very narrow conception of self, and thus fail to capture the full range of potentially relevant DBS-induced changes. Second, building on previous work by Shaun Gallagher, we propose a modified ‘pattern-theory of self’, which provides a richer picture of the possible consequences of DBS treatment.
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  20.  44
    Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more (...)
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  21.  24
    Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious (...)
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  22. Sven Nyholm & Elizabeth O'Neill (forthcoming). Deep Brain Stimulation, Continuity Over Time, and the True Self. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    One of the topics that often comes up in ethical discussions of deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the question of what impact DBS has, or might have, on the patient’s self. This is often understood as a question of whether DBS poses a “threat” to personal identity, which is typically understood as having to do with psychological and/or narrative continuity over time. In this article, we argue that the discussion of whether DBS is a “threat” to continuity over time (...)
     
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  23. Daniel Sharp & David Wasserman (forthcoming). Deep Brain Stimulation, Historicism, and Moral Responsibility. Neuroethics:1-13.
    Although philosophers have explored several connections between neuroscience and moral responsibility, the issue of how real-world neurological modifications, such as Deep Brain Stimulation, impact moral responsibility has received little attention. In this article, we draw on debates about the relevance of history and manipulation to moral responsibility to argue that certain kinds of neurological modification can diminish the responsibility of the agents so modified. We argue for a historicist position - a version of the history-sensitive reflection view - and (...)
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  24.  9
    George A. Ojemann (1983). Brain Organization for Language From the Perspective of Electrical Stimulation Mapping. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):189.
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  25.  2
    Lloyd R. Peterson & Susan Kroener (1964). Dichotic Stimulation and Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (2):125.
  26.  26
    Grant Gillett (2011). Minimally Conscious States, Deep Brain Stimulation, and What is Worse Than Futility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):145-149.
    The concept of futility is sometimes regarded as a cloak for medical paternalism in that it rolls together medical and value judgments. Often, despite attempts to disambiguate the concept, that is true and it can be applied in such a way as to marginalize the real interests of a patient. I suggest we replace it with a conceptual toolkit that includes physiological futility, substantial benefit (SB), and the risk of unacceptable badness (RUB) in that these concepts allow us to articulate (...)
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  27.  2
    John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen (1972). Ear Asymmetry and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects of Task Requirements and Competitive Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):269.
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  28.  3
    W. S. Hunter & M. Sigler (1940). The Span of Visual Discrimination as a Function of Time and Intensity of Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):160.
  29.  4
    Marie-Hélène Grosbras & Tomáš Paus (2003). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Human Frontal Eye Field Facilitates Visual Awareness. European Journal of Neuroscience 18 (11):3121-3126.
  30.  1
    Virginie Moulier, Christian Gaudeau-Bosma, Clémence Isaac, Anne-Camille Allard, Noomane Bouaziz, Djedia Sidhoumi, Sonia Braha-Zeitoun, René Benadhira, Fanny Thomas & Dominique Januel (2016). Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mood in Healthy Subjects. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  31.  7
    Susanne M. Bondesson, Ulf Jakobsson, Lars Edvinsson & Ingalill Rahm Hallberg (2013). Hospital Utilization and Costs for Spinal Cord Stimulation Compared with Enhanced External Counterpulsation for Refractory Angina Pectoris. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):139-147.
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  32.  6
    O. D. Fowler (1940). Neurophysiological and Psychological Changes Induced by Certain Drugs: I. Responses to Electrical Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):657.
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  33.  7
    Paul W. Fox, Kenneth A. Blick & Edward A. Bilodeau (1964). Stimulation and Prediction of Verbal Recall and Misrecall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):321.
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  34.  3
    Julian E. Hochberg, William Triebel & Gideon Seaman (1951). Color Adaptation Under Conditions of Homogeneous Visual Stimulation (Ganzfeld). Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (2):153.
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  35.  7
    W. W. Breen, M. J. De Haemer & G. K. Poock (1969). Comparison of the Effect of Auditory Versus Visual Stimulation on Information Capacity of Discrete Motor Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):395.
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  36.  4
    James J. Gibson, Jean Purdy & Lois Lawrence (1955). A Method of Controlling Stimulation for the Study of Space Perception: The Optical Tunnel. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (1):1.
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  37.  8
    W. L. Jenkins (1938). Studies in Thermal Sensitivity: 5. The Reactions of Untrained Subjects to Simultaneous Warm + Cold Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (5):451.
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  38.  24
    Alan E. Fuchs (1976). The Production of Pleasure by Stimulation of the Brain: An Alleged Conflict Between Science and Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (June):494-505.
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  39.  6
    R. M. Bellows (1936). An Experimental Isolation of Some Factors Determining Response to Rhythmic Cutaneous Stimulation. I. Frequency, Pressure, and Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (6):716.
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  40.  6
    J. W. Gebhard (1943). Chromatic Phenomena Produced by Intermittent Stimulation of the Retina. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (5):387.
  41. Joe L. Lewis (1972). Semantic Processing with Bisensory Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):455.
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  42.  4
    Leonard T. Troland (1917). On the Measurement of Visual Stimulation Intensities. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):1-33.
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  43.  1
    I. P. Howard, B. Craske & W. B. Templeton (1965). Visuomotor Adaptation to Discordant Exafferent Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (2):189.
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  44.  5
    S. M. Newhall & R. Dodge (1927). Colored After-Images From Unperceived Weak Chromatic Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 10 (1):1.
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  45.  5
    S. H. Bartley (1940). The Relation Between Cortical Response to Visual Stimulation and Changes in the Alpha Rhythm. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):624.
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  46.  6
    Par A. Bjorkstrand (1973). Electrodermal Responses as Affected by Subject- Versus Experimenter-Controlled Noxious Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (3):365.
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  47.  1
    Sheldon Cashdan (1968). Visual and Haptic Form Discrimination Under Conditions of Successive Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (2p1):215.
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  48.  4
    Seymour Wapner, Heinz Werner & Kenneth A. Chandler (1951). Experiments on Sensory-Tonic Field Theory of Perception: I. Effect of Extraneous Stimulation on the Visual Perception of Verticality. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (5):341.
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  49.  4
    J. W. Gebhard (1952). Thresholds of the Human Eye for Electric Stimulation by Different Wave Forms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (2):132.
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  50.  4
    I. L. Child & G. R. Wendt (1938). The Temporal Course of the Influence of Visual Stimulation Upon the Auditory Threshold. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (2):109.
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