Search results for 'Stoic logic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susanne Bobzien (2003). Stoic Logic. In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Stoic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 246.0
    ABSTRACT: An introduction to Stoic logic. Stoic logic can in many respects be regarded as a fore-runner of modern propositional logic. I discuss: 1. the Stoic notion of sayables or meanings (lekta); the Stoic assertibles (axiomata) and their similarities and differences to modern propositions; the time-dependency of their truth; 2.-3. assertibles with demonstratives and quantified assertibles and their truth-conditions; truth-functionality of negations and conjunctions; non-truth-functionality of disjunctions and conditionals; language regimentation and ‘bracketing’ devices; (...)
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  2. Susanne Bobzien (1986). Die Stoische Modallogik (Stoic Modal Logic). Königshausen & Neumann.score: 210.0
    ABSTRACT: Part 1 discusses the Stoic notion of propositions (assertibles, axiomata): their definition; their truth-criteria; the relation between sentence and proposition; propositions that perish; propositions that change their truth-value; the temporal dependency of propositions; the temporal dependency of the Stoic notion of truth; pseudo-dates in propositions. Part 2 discusses Stoic modal logic: the Stoic definitions of their modal notions (possibility, impossibility, necessity, non-necessity); the logical relations between the modalities; modalities as properties of propositions; contingent propositions; (...)
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  3. Anthony Speca (2001). Hypothetical Syllogistic and Stoic Logic. Brill.score: 204.0
    This book uncovers and examines the confusion in antiquity between Aristotle's hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic logic, and offers a fresh perspective on the ...
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  4. Raul Corazzon, Stoic Logic: The Dialectic and the Doctrine of Lekta (Sayables).score: 180.0
    reasons for the disappreciation as well as for the rehabilitation of Stoic logic; it is found in I. M. Bochenski's Ancient Formal Logic (Amsterdam, 1951), and it clearly portrays the difference in attitude of the logicians of the twentieth century towards the Stoic logical system.
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  5. Benson Mates (1973). Stoic Logic. Berkeley,University of California Press.score: 178.0
  6. Anneli Luhtala (2000). On the Origin of Syntactical Description in Stoic Logic. Nodus.score: 174.0
  7. Peter Milne (1995). On the Completeness of Non-Philonian Stoic Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 16 (1):39-64.score: 156.0
  8. Alonzo Church (1950). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic and the Text of Sextus Empiricus. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (1):63-64.score: 156.0
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  9. Josiah Gould (1974). Deduction in Stoic Logic. In. In John Corcoran (ed.), Ancient Logic and its Modern Interpretations. Boston,Reidel. 151--168.score: 156.0
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  10. Jonathan Barnes (1999). Aristotle and Stoic Logic. In Katerina Ierodiakonou (ed.), Topics in Stoic Philosophy. Clarendon Press.score: 156.0
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  11. Alonzo Church (1963). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (4):295-295.score: 156.0
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  12. Czeslaw Lejewski (1954). Review: Benson Mates, Stoic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):71-72.score: 156.0
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  13. Marek Nasieniewski (2014). Is Stoic Logic Classical? Logic and Logical Philosophy 6:55.score: 156.0
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  14. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part Two). In Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. CUP.score: 150.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic theory of arguments, including truth-value changes of arguments, Stoic syllogistic, Stoic indemonstrable arguments, Stoic inference rules (themata), including cut rules and antilogism, argumental deduction, elements of relevance logic in Stoic syllogistic, the question of completeness of Stoic logic, Stoic arguments valid in the specific sense, e.g. "Dio says it is day. But Dio speaks truly. Therefore it is day." A more formal and more detailed account (...)
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  15. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part One). In Keimpe Algra & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic logic, part one, including their theories of propositions (or assertibles, Greek: axiomata), demonstratives, temporal truth, simple propositions, non-simple propositions(conjunction, disjunction, conditional), quantified propositions, logical truths, modal logic, and general theory of arguments (including definition, validity, soundness, classification of invalid arguments).
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  16. Charles H. Kahn (1969). Stoic Logic and Stoic LOGOS. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):158-172.score: 150.0
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  17. Paolo Crivelli (1994). Indefinite Propositions and Anaphora in Stoic Logic. Phronesis 39 (2):187-206.score: 150.0
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  18. D. W. Hamlyn (1963). The Logic of the Stoics Benson Mates: Stoic Logic. Pp. Viii+148. Berkeley: University of California Press (London: Cambridge University Press), 1961. Paper, 12s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (01):55-57.score: 150.0
  19. Mauro Nasti de Vincentis (1984). Stopper on Nasti's Contention and Stoic Logic. Phronesis 29 (3):313-324.score: 150.0
  20. Mauro Nasti De Vincentis (1984). Stopper on Nasti's Contention and Stoic Logic. Phronesis 29 (3):313-324.score: 150.0
  21. J. Banas (2003). Aristotelian Versus Stoic Logic. Filozofia 58 (8):551-563.score: 150.0
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  22. Claude Imbert (1980). Stoic Logic and Alexandrian Poetics. In Malcolm Schofield, Myles Burnyeat & Jonathan Barnes (eds.), Doubt and Dogmatism: Studies in Hellenistic Epistemology. Oxford University Press. 182--216.score: 150.0
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  23. J. M. Rist (1981). The Importance of Stoic Logic in the Contra Celsum. In A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.), Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.score: 150.0
  24. Ian Mueller (1979). The Completeness of Stoic Propositional Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (1):201-215.score: 126.0
  25. Susanne Bobzien (2011). The Combinatorics of Stoic Conjunction. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):157-188.score: 120.0
    ABSTRACT: The 3rd BCE Stoic logician "Chrysippus says that the number of conjunctions constructible from ten propositions exceeds one million. Hipparchus refuted this, demonstrating that the affirmative encompasses 103,049 conjunctions and the negative 310,952." After laying dormant for over 2000 years, the numbers in this Plutarch passage were recently identified as the 10th (and a derivative of the 11th) Schröder number, and F. Acerbi showed how the 2nd BCE astronomer Hipparchus could have calculated them. What remained unexplained is why (...)
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  26. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Aristotle's Theory of the Stoic Indemonstrables. In M. Lee (ed.), Strategies of Argument: Essays in Ancient Ethics, Epistemology, and Logic. OUP. 199-227.score: 120.0
    ABSTRACT: Alexander of Aphrodisias’ commentaries on Aristotle’s Organon are valuable sources for both Stoic and early Peripatetic logic, and have often been used as such – in particular for early Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic propositional logic. By contrast, this paper explores the role Alexander himself played in the development and transmission of those theories. There are three areas in particular where he seems to have made a difference: First, he drew a connection between certain passages (...)
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  27. Ian Mueller (1969). Stoic and Peidpatetic Logic. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):173-187.score: 120.0
  28. William H. Hay (1969). Stoic Use of Logic. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (2):145-157.score: 120.0
  29. David Hitchcock (2005). The Peculiarities of Stoic Propositional Logic. In John Woods, Kent A. Peacock & A. D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of Reason: Essays in Honour of John Woods. University of Toronto Press. 224--242.score: 120.0
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  30. J. Eric Butler (2005). Stoic Metaphysics and the Logic of Sense. Philosophy Today 49 (5):128-137.score: 120.0
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  31. W. D. Ross (1907). Davidson's Stoic Creed The Stoic Creed. By William L. Davidson, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Aberdeen. Edinburgh : T. And T. Clark, 1907. 8vo. 1 Vol. Pp. Xxiii + 274. 4s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (08):240-241.score: 120.0
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  32. Susanne Bobzien (1996). Stoic Syllogistic. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:133-92.score: 114.0
    ABSTRACT: For the Stoics, a syllogism is a formally valid argument; the primary function of their syllogistic is to establish such formal validity. Stoic syllogistic is a system of formal logic that relies on two types of argumental rules: (i) 5 rules (the accounts of the indemonstrables) which determine whether any given argument is an indemonstrable argument, i.e. an elementary syllogism the validity of which is not in need of further demonstration; (ii) one unary and three binary argumental (...)
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  33. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Logic, History Of: Ancient Logic. In Donald M. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Thomson Gale.score: 114.0
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with a focus on issues that may be of interest to contemporary logicians and covering important topics in Post-Aristotelian logic that are frequently neglected (such as Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic, the Stoic axiomatic system of propositional logic and various later ancient developments).
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  34. Susanne Bobzien (2002). Pre-Stoic Hypothetical Syllogistic in Galen. The Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies:57-72.score: 114.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the evidence in Galen's Introduction to Logic (Institutio Logica) for a hypothetical syllogistic which predates Stoic propositional logic. It emerges that Galen is one of our main witnesses for such a theory, whose authors are most likely Theophrastus and Eudemus. A reconstruction of this theory is offered which - among other things - allows to solve some apparent textual difficulties in the Institutio Logica.
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  35. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Ancient Logic. In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 114.0
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with an emphasis on topics which may be of interest to contemporary logicians. Content: 1. Pre-Aristotelian Logic 1.1 Syntax and Semantics 1.2 Argument Patterns and Valid Inference 2. Aristotle 2.1 Dialectics 2.2 Sub-sentential Classifications 2.3 Syntax and Semantics of Sentences 2.4 Non-modal Syllogistic 2.5 Modal Logic 3. The early Peripatetics: Theophrastus and Eudemus 3.1 Improvements and Modifications of Aristotle's Logic 3.2 (...)
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  36. Susanne Bobzien (1993). Chrysippus' Modal Logic and Its Relation to Philo and Diodorus. In K. Doering & Th Ebert (eds.), Dialektiker und Stoiker. Franz Steiner. 63--84.score: 102.0
    ABSTRACT: The modal systems of the Stoic logician Chrysippus and the two Hellenistic logicians Philo and Diodorus Cronus have survived in a fragmentary state in several sources. From these it is clear that Chrysippus was acquainted with Philo’s and Diodorus’ modal notions, and also that he developed his own in contrast of Diodorus’ and in some way incorporated Philo’s. The goal of this paper is to reconstruct the three modal systems, including their modal definitions and modal theorems, and to (...)
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  37. Dragan Stoianovici (2010). Formal Logic Vs. Philosophical Argument. Argumentation 24 (1):125-133.score: 102.0
    The wider topic to which the content of this paper belongs is that of the relationship between formal logic and real argumentation. Of particular potential interest in this connection are held to be substantive arguments constructed by philosophers reputed equally as authorities in logical theory. A number of characteristics are tentatively indicated by the author as likely to be encountered in such arguments. The discussion centers afterwards, by way of specification, on a remarkable piece of argument quoted in Cicero’s (...)
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  38. Susanne Bobzien (1996). Logic. In Simon Hornblower & A. Spawforth (eds.), The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3rd edition. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    ABSTRACT: A very brief summary presentation of western ancient logic for the non-specialized reader, from the beginnings to Boethius. For a much more detailed presentation see my "Ancient Logic" in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosopy (also on PhilPapers).
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  39. Susanne Bobzien (1997). The Stoics on Hypotheses and Hypothetical Arguments. Phronesis 42 (3):299-312.score: 82.0
    ABSTRACT: In this paper I argue (i) that the hypothetical arguments about which the Stoic Chrysippus wrote numerous books (DL 7.196) are not to be confused with the so-called "hypothetical syllogisms", but are the same hypothetical arguments as those mentioned five times in Epictetus (e.g. Diss. 1.25.11-12); and (ii) that these hypothetical arguments are formed by replacing in a non-hypothetical argument one (or more) of the premisses by a Stoic "hypothesis" or supposition. Such "hypotheses" or suppositions differ from (...)
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  40. Stephen H. Daniel (2008). Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance. In , New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.score: 72.0
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of (...)
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  41. Paul Redding (2014). The Role of Logic "Commonly So Called" in Hegel's Science of Logic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):281-301.score: 72.0
    This paper examines Hegel’s accounts of the nature of judgements and inferences in the ‘subjective logic’ of the Science of Logic, and does so in light of the history of the tradition of formal logic to his time. It is argued that, contrary to the attitude often displayed by interpreters of Hegel’s logic, it is important to understand the positive role played by formal logic, ‘logic commonly so called’, in Hegel’s own conception of (...). It is argued that Hegel’s own scientific presentation [Darstellung] of logic relies on a dialectic working through the tradition of formal logic from Aristotle to Leibniz. The positions within the dialectic are most easily brought into focus in terms of the distinction between Aristotelian and Stoic logic, but they can also be seen as internal to Aristotelian logic. The logical tradition can be regarded as presenting a type of reductio ad absurdum, and a science of logic must examine what it was about Aristotle’s original project that brought it to this fate. (shrink)
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  42. John Marenbon (ed.) (2007). The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). [REVIEW] Brill.score: 72.0
    The specialized essays in this collection study whether non-Aristotelian traditions of ancient logic had a role for medieval logicians. Special attention is given to Stoic logic and semantics, and to Neoplatonism.
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  43. Susanne Bobzien (2012). How to Give Someone Horns – Paradoxes of Presupposition in Antiquity. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 15:159-84.score: 68.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses ancient versions of paradoxes today classified as paradoxes of presupposition and how their ancient solutions compare with contemporary ones. Sections 1-4 air ancient evidence for the Fallacy of Complex Question and suggested solutions, introduce the Horn Paradox, consider its authorship and contemporary solutions. Section 5 reconstructs the Stoic solution, suggesting the Stoics produced a Russellian-type solution based on a hidden scope ambiguity of negation. The difference to Russell’s explanation of definite descriptions is that in the (...)
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  44. Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.) (2004). Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier.score: 66.0
    Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Gödel, The Emergence of Classical Logic, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. (...)
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  45. Susanne Bobzien (2002). A Greek Parallel to Boethius' de Hypotheticis Syllogismis. Mnemosyne 55 (3):285-300.score: 66.0
    In this paper I present the text, a translation, and a commentary of a long anonymous scholium to Aristotle’s Analytics which is a Greek parallel to Boethius’ De Hypotheticis Syllogismis, but has so far not been recognized as such. The scholium discusses hypothetical syllogisms of the types modus ponens and modus tollens and hypothetical syllogisms constructed from three conditionals (‘wholly hypothetical syllogisms’). It is Peripatetic, and not Stoic, in its theoretical approach as well as its terminology. There are several (...)
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  46. John M. Rist (1969). Stoic Philosophy. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 64.0
    Literature on the Stoa has recently concentrated on historical accounts of the development of the school and on Stoicism as a social movement. Professor Rist’s approach is to examine in detail a series of philosophical problems discussed by leading members of the Stoic school. He is not concerned with social history or with the influence of Stoicism on popular beliefs in the Ancient world, but with such questions as the relation between Stoicism and the thought of Aristotle, the meaning (...)
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  47. Susanne Bobzien (2002). Chrysippus and the Epistemic Theory of Vagueness. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (1):217-238.score: 60.0
    ABSTRACT: Recently a bold and admirable interpretation of Chrysippus’ position on the Sorites has been presented, suggesting that Chrysippus offered a solution to the Sorites by (i) taking an epistemicist position1 which (ii) made allowances for higher-order vagueness. In this paper I argue (i) that Chrysippus did not take an epistemicist position, but − if any − a non-epistemic one which denies truth-values to some cases in a Sorites-series, and (ii) that it is uncertain whether and how he made allowances (...)
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  48. John Corcoran (2006). Schemata: The Concept of Schema in the History of Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):219-240.score: 60.0
    The syllogistic figures and moods can be taken to be argument schemata as can the rules of the Stoic propositional logic. Sentence schemata have been used in axiomatizations of logic only since the landmark 1927 von Neumann paper [31]. Modern philosophers know the role of schemata in explications of the semantic conception of truth through Tarski’s 1933 Convention T [42]. Mathematical logicians recognize the role of schemata in first-order number theory where Peano’s second-order Induction Axiom is approximated (...)
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