Search results for 'Stoics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. W. Sharples (1996). Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics: An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The Hellenistic philosophers and schools of philosophy are emerging from the shadow of Plato and Aristotle and are increasingly studied for their intrinsic philosophical value. They are not only interesting in their own right, but also form the intellectual background of the late Roman Republic. This study gives a comprehensive and readable account of the principal doctrines of the Stoics, Epicureans and various sceptical traditions from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to around 200 A.D. Discussions (...)
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  2. Catherine Atherton (1993). The Stoics on Ambiguity. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Stoic work on ambiguity represents one of the most innovative, sophisticated, and rigorous contributions to philosophy and the study of language in western antiquity. This book is both the first comprehensive survey of the often difficult and scattered sources, and the first attempt to locate Stoic material in the rich array of contexts, ancient and modern, which alone can guarantee full appreciation of its subtlety, scope and complexity. The comparisons and contrasts which this book constructs will intrigue not just classical (...)
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  3. Brad Inwood & Lloyd P. Gerson (eds.) (2008). The Stoics Reader: Selected Writings and Testimonia. Hackett Pub. Co., Inc..score: 24.0
    Lives of the stoics (Zeno, Aristo, Herillus, Cleanthes, Sphaerus, Chrysippus) on philosophy -- Logic and theory of knowledge -- Perception, knowledge, and sceptical attack -- The stoic-academic debate and Cicero's testimony -- Conceptions and rationality -- Physics -- Theology -- Bodily and non-bodily realities -- Structures and powers -- The soul -- Fate -- Ethics -- The general account in Diogenes Lartius -- The account preserved by Stobaeus -- The account in Cicero on goals -- Other evidence for stoic (...)
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  4. Sarah Wright (2012). How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.score: 24.0
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism (...)
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  5. Andreas Graeser (1972). Plotinus and the Stoics. Leiden,Brill.score: 24.0
    Among those in question, Aristotle 6 and the Peripatetics, the Stoics and also the Epicureans,7 were the main opponents 8 to For a good account of the ...
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  6. Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (2005). The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Roman Stoic thinkers in the imperial period adapted Greek doctrine to create a model of the self that served to connect philosophical ideals with traditional societal values. The Roman Stoics-the most prominent being Marcus Aurelius-engaged in rigorous self-examination that enabled them to integrate philosophy into the practice of living. Gretchen Reydams-Schils's innovative new book shows how these Romans applied their distinct brand of social ethics to everyday relations and responsibilities. The Roman Stoics reexamines the philosophical basis that instructed (...)
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  7. Brad Inwood (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This unique volume offers an odyssey through the ideas of the Stoics in three particular ways: first, through the historical trajectory of the school itself and its influence; second, through the recovery of the history of Stoic thought; third, through the ongoing confrontation with Stoicism, showing how it refines philosophical traditions, challenges the imagination, and ultimately defines the kind of life one chooses to lead. A distinguished roster of specialists have written an authoritative guide to the entire philosophical tradition. (...)
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  8. G. R. Boys-Stones (2001). Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of its Development From the Stoics to Origen. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book traces, for the first time, a revolution in philosophy which took place during the early centuries of our era. It reconstructs the philosophical basis of the Stoics' theory that fragments of an ancient and divine wisdom could be reconstructed from mythological traditions, and shows that Platonism was founded on an argument that Plato had himself achieved a full reconstruction of this wisdom, and that subsequent philosophies had only regressed once again in their attempts to "improve" on his (...)
     
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  9. Ricardo Salles (2005). The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism. Ashgate Pub..score: 22.0
    The basis of stoic determinism (a) : everything has a cause -- The basis of stoic determinism (b) : causation is necessitating -- The threat of external determination -- Reflection and responsibility -- The three compatibilist theories of Chrysippus -- Epictetus on responsibility for unreflective action.
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  10. John Sellars (2003). The Art of Living: The Stoics on the Nature and Function of Philosophy. Ashgate.score: 21.0
    Questioning the premise that philosophy can only be conceived as a rational discourse, Sellars presents it instead as an art (techne) that combines both 'logos' ...
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  11. A. A. Long (1986). Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics. University of California Press.score: 21.0
  12. Samuel Sambursky (1959/1987). Physics of the Stoics. Princeton University Press.score: 21.0
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  13. F. H. Sandbach (1985). Aristotle and the Stoics. Cambridge Philological Society.score: 21.0
  14. F. H. Sandbach (1994). The Stoics. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 21.0
  15. Jeffrey Barnouw (2002). Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication, and Sign in Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. University Press of America.score: 21.0
  16. Edwyn Robert Bevan (1979). Stoics and Sceptics. Arno Press.score: 21.0
  17. Firmin DeBrabander (2007/2008). Spinoza and the Stoics: Power, Politics and the Passions. Continuum.score: 21.0
  18. Christoph Jedan (2002). Modalities by Perspective: Aristotle, the Stoics and a Modern Reconstruction. Academia.score: 21.0
  19. Eduard Zeller (1962). The Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics. New York, Russell & Russell.score: 21.0
  20. Susanne Bobzien (2006). The Stoics on Fallacies of Equivocation. In D. Frede & B. Inwood (eds.), Language and Learning, Proceedings of the 9th Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press.score: 20.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the Stoic treatment of fallacies that are based on lexical ambiguities. It provides a detailed analysis of the relevant passages, lays bare textual and interpretative difficulties, explores what the Stoic view on the matter implies for their theory of language, and compares their view with Aristotle’s. In the paper I aim to show that, for the Stoics, fallacies of ambiguity are complexes of propositions and sentences and thus straddle the realms of meaning (which is the (...)
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  21. Katja Maria Vogt (2009). Sons of the Earth: Are the Stoics Metaphysical Brutes? Phronesis 54 (2):136-154.score: 20.0
    In this paper, it is argued the Stoics develop an account of corporeals that allows their theory of bodies to be, at the same time, a theory of causation, agency, and reason. The paper aims to shed new light on the Stoics' engagement with Plato's Sophist . It is argued that the Stoics are Sons of the Earth insofar as, for them, the study of corporeals - rather than the study of being - is the most fundamental (...)
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  22. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part Two). In Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. CUP.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic theory of arguments, including truth-value changes of arguments, Stoic syllogistic, Stoic indemonstrable arguments, Stoic inference rules (themata), including cut rules and antilogism, argumental deduction, elements of relevance logic in Stoic syllogistic, the question of completeness of Stoic logic, Stoic arguments valid in the specific sense, e.g. "Dio says it is day. But Dio speaks truly. Therefore it is day." A more formal and more detailed account of the Stoic theory of deduction can be found (...)
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  23. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part One). In Keimpe Algra & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic logic, part one, including their theories of propositions (or assertibles, Greek: axiomata), demonstratives, temporal truth, simple propositions, non-simple propositions(conjunction, disjunction, conditional), quantified propositions, logical truths, modal logic, and general theory of arguments (including definition, validity, soundness, classification of invalid arguments).
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  24. Susanne Bobzien (1997). The Stoics on Hypotheses and Hypothetical Arguments. Phronesis 42 (3):299-312.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: In this paper I argue (i) that the hypothetical arguments about which the Stoic Chrysippus wrote numerous books (DL 7.196) are not to be confused with the so-called "hypothetical syllogisms", but are the same hypothetical arguments as those mentioned five times in Epictetus (e.g. Diss. 1.25.11-12); and (ii) that these hypothetical arguments are formed by replacing in a non-hypothetical argument one (or more) of the premisses by a Stoic "hypothesis" or supposition. Such "hypotheses" or suppositions differ from propositions in (...)
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  25. Robert Blair Edlow (1975). The Stoics on Ambiguity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (4):423-435.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to recover a long neglected chapter in the philosophy of language as it developed in antiquity--The ancient greek stoics' teaching on ambiguity. Although the overwhelming majority of the doxographical accounts of this subject have been lost, Sufficient entries have survived to allow a partial description of the stoic doctrine. What is intriguing about the stoics' teaching is the subtlety of some of the kinds of ambiguity they include in their catalogue. The types of ambiguity that (...)
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  26. Glenn Lesses (1993). Austere Friends: The Stoics and Friendship. Apeiron 26 (1):57 - 75.score: 18.0
    Greek eudaimonists often discuss the nature and value of friendship. The prominence of such discussions results from the utility of the conception of friendship in formulating and testing central ethical doctrines. As they engage in a radical revision of ordinary ethical concepts, the Stoics challenge us to relinquish conventional beliefs about friendship. Ideal Stoic moral agents are passionless and austere. Yet, the Stoics not only contend that these relatively affectless temperaments have friends but that, in fact, friendship is (...)
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  27. Mark A. Kulstad (2008). Newton, Spinoza, Stoics and Others. The Leibniz Review 18:81-121.score: 18.0
    Starting from Leibniz’s complaint that Newton’s views seem to make God the soul of the world, this paper examines Leibniz’s critical stance more generally towards God as the soul of the world and related theses. A preliminary task is determining what the related theses are. There are more of these than might have been thought. Once the relations are established, it becomes clear how pervasive the various guises of the issue of God as the soul of the world are in (...)
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  28. Ruben Buys (2011). Between Actor and Spectator: Arnout Geulincx and the Stoics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):741-761.score: 18.0
    The work of Arnout Geulincx (1624?1669), a Flemish Cartesian that developed a highly curious ?parallelistic? view on the universe, shows striking prima facie resemblances to Stoicism. Should we label Geulincx a reinventor of Stoic tenets, albeit within a strict Cartesian theoretical framework? To answer this question, my contribution begins by discussing relevant aspects of Stoicism and by introducing the ?existential? philosophy of Geulincx, whose metaphysical views on man brought him to adopt an ethics based upon absolute obedience and humility. It (...)
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  29. Marcelo D. Boeri (2001). The Stoics on Bodies and Incorporeals. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):723 - 752.score: 18.0
    The Stoics incorporeals are "somethings" which, albeit nonexistent strictly, are subsistent. For the Stoics things truly existent are bodies. So, the question is: what role do incorporeals play in Stoic ontology? The author endeavors to demonstrate that the interpretation that incorporeals are secondary realities (bodies being the primary ones) is not consistent with Stoic philosophy as a whole. At this point the argument is that bodies and incorporeals serve to complement each other in the sense that one cannot (...)
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  30. Maykʻl Papazian (2007). The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):488-490.score: 18.0
    The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism is an important book which reconstructs the arguments deployed by the Stoics in favour of the view that everything is necessary and examines the development of the different arguments given by the Stoics that this is compatible with moral responsibility and desert. The book carefully distinguishes two separate theses in Stoic theory, that everything that happens and is the case has a cause and that causation is necessitating. The book also provides (...)
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  31. Alexander Jones (2003). The Stoics and the Astronomical Sciences. In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press. 328--44.score: 18.0
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  32. J. McMahon, Beauty as Harmony of the Soul: The Aesthetic of the Stoics.score: 18.0
    Aesthetics is not an area to which the Stoics are normally understood to have contributed. I adopt a broad description of the purview of Aesthetics according to which Aesthetics pertains to the study of those preferences and values that ground what is considered worthy of attention. According to this approach, we find that the Stoics exhibit an Aesthetic that reveals a direct line of development between Plato, the Stoics, Thomas Aquinas and the eighteenth century, specifically Kant’s aesthetics. (...)
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  33. John Sellars (2012). Stoics Against Stoics In Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):935-952.score: 16.0
    In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ?up to us? and that these things are the product of our choice. These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim (...)
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  34. Christopher Gill (2007). Galen and the Stoics: Mortal Enemies or Blood Brothers? Phronesis 52 (1):88-120.score: 16.0
    Galen is well known as a critic of Stoicism, mainly for his massive attack on Stoic (or at least, Chrysippean) psychology in "On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato" (PHP) 2-5. Galen attacks both Chrysippus' location of the ruling part of the psyche in the heart and his unified or monistic picture of human psychology. However, if we consider Galen's thought more broadly, this has a good deal in common with Stoicism, including a (largely) physicalist conception of psychology and a (...)
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  35. Antonia Macaro (2010). What Can the Stoics Do for Us? The Philosophers' Magazine 49 (49):81-88.score: 16.0
    If you started delving into Stoic literature, you might find some of the advice repugnant, even shocking. In Epictetus, for instance, you would find this exhortation: “If you kiss your child, or your wife, say to yourself that it is a human being that you are kissing; and then you will not be disturbed if either of them dies.” So is Stoicism a life-affirming philosophy that can truly help us to live better lives in the modern world or a fiercely (...)
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  36. Brad Inwood (1985). The Stoics on the Grammar of Action. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):75-86.score: 16.0
    This article reconstructs key features of the early stoic analysis of human action from surviving fragmentary reports. Special attention is paid to how the concepts of assent and command (understood as real mental events) and the more general concept of meaning ("lekta") are used to enrich an analysis of action as a response to a stimulative presentation.
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  37. Mario Mignucci (1999). The Liar Paradox and the Stoics. In Katerina Ierodiakonou (ed.), Topics in Stoic Philosophy. Clarendon Press.score: 16.0
     
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  38. Richard Sorabji (2012). Gandhi and the Stoics: Modern Experiments on Ancient Values. Oup Oxford.score: 16.0
    Richard Sorabji presents a fascinating study of Gandhi's philosophy in comparison with Christian and Stoic thought. He shows that Gandhi was a true philosopher, who not only aimed to give a consistent self-critical rationale for his views, but also thought himself obliged to live by what he taught.
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  39. David Forman (2008). Free Will and the Freedom of the Sage in Leibniz and the Stoics. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (3):203-219.score: 15.0
  40. Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting (eds.) (1996). Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    This major collection of essays offers the first serious challenge to the traditional view that ancient and modern ethics are fundamentally opposed.
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  41. Richard Sorabji (2009). Did the Stoics Value Emotion and Feeling? [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):150-162.score: 15.0
  42. Martha Nussbaum (1987). The Stoics on the Extirpation of the Passions. Apeiron 20 (2):129 - 177.score: 15.0
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  43. John Glucker (2003). Stoics, Para-Stoics and Anti-Stoics: Methods and Sensibilities. Philosophia 31 (1-2):221-324.score: 15.0
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  44. John Sellars (2004). The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):337-338.score: 15.0
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  45. Charles Brittain (2006). Review of Gretchen Reydams-Schils, The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).score: 15.0
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  46. Josiah Gould (1981). The Stoics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):245-247.score: 15.0
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  47. Luca Castagnoli (2011). The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism. Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):228-235.score: 15.0
  48. A. A. Long (1985). The Stoics on World-Conflagration and Everlasting Recurrence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):13-37.score: 15.0
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  49. Eric Lewis (1995). The Stoics on Identity and Individuation. Phronesis 40 (1):89 - 108.score: 15.0
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