Search results for 'Stoics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Sorabji (2000/2002). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Richard Sorabji presents a ground-breaking study of ancient Greek views of the emotions and their influence on subsequent theories and attitudes, Pagan and Christian. While the central focus of the book is the Stoics, Sorabji draws on a vast range of texts to give a rich historical survey of how Western thinking about this central aspect of human nature developed.
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  2. Malcolm Schofield (1991/1999). The Stoic Idea of the City. University of Chicago Press.score: 72.0
    The Stoic Idea of the City offers the first systematic analysis of the Stoic school, concentrating on Zeno's Republic . Renowned classical scholar Malcolm Schofield brings together scattered and underused textual evidence, examining the Stoic ideals that initiated the natural law tradition of Western political thought. A new foreword by Martha Nussbaum and a new epilogue written by the author further secure this text as the standard work on Presocratic Stoics. "The account emerges from a jigsaw-puzzle of items from (...)
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  3. W. M. L. Hutchinson (1911). Two Books on Stoicism Marcus Aurelius and the Later Stoics ('The World's Epoch-Makers' Series). By F. W. Bussell, D.D. Cr. 8vo. Pp. Xi + 302. Edinburgh: T. And T. Clark, 1910. 3s. Roman Stoicism: Being Lectures on the History of the Stoic Philosophy, with Special Reference to its Development Within the Roman Empire. By E. Vernon Arnold, Litt.D., Professor of Latin in the University College of North Wales, and Formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. 8vo. Pp. Ix + 468. Cambridge University Press, 1911. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 25 (06):182-185.score: 72.0
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  4. G. R. Boys-Stones (2001). Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of its Development From the Stoics to Origen. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    This book traces, for the first time, a revolution in philosophy which took place during the early centuries of our era. It reconstructs the philosophical basis of the Stoics' theory that fragments of an ancient and divine wisdom could be reconstructed from mythological traditions, and shows that Platonism was founded on an argument that Plato had himself achieved a full reconstruction of this wisdom, and that subsequent philosophies had only regressed once again in their attempts to "improve" on his (...)
     
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  5. Jeffrey Barnouw (2002). Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication, and Sign in Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. University Press of America.score: 66.0
  6. Samuel Sambursky (1959/1987). Physics of the Stoics. Princeton University Press.score: 66.0
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  7. Anneli Luhtala (2000). On the Origin of Syntactical Description in Stoic Logic. Nodus.score: 66.0
  8. Susanne Bobzien (1998). Determinism and Freedom in Stoic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Bobzien presents the definitive study of one of the most interesting intellectual legacies of the ancient Greeks: the Stoic theory of causal determinism. She explains what it was, how the Stoics justified it, and how it relates to their views on possibility, action, freedom, moral responsibility, moral character, fatalism, logical determinism and many other topics. She demonstrates the considerable philosophical richness and power that these ideas retain today.
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  9. Robert Bees (2004). Die Oikeiosislehre der Stoa. Königshausen & Neumann.score: 60.0
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  10. Gérard Verbeke (1983). The Presence of Stoicism in Medieval Thought. Catholic University of America Press.score: 60.0
     
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  11. Anthony Speca (2001). Hypothetical Syllogistic and Stoic Logic. Brill.score: 56.0
    This book uncovers and examines the confusion in antiquity between Aristotle's hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic logic, and offers a fresh perspective on the ...
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  12. Lois Peters Agnew (2008). Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics. University of South Carolina Press.score: 56.0
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
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  13. Brad Inwood (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    This unique volume offers an odyssey through the ideas of the Stoics in three particular ways: first, through the historical trajectory of the school itself and its influence; second, through the recovery of the history of Stoic thought; third, through the ongoing confrontation with Stoicism, showing how it refines philosophical traditions, challenges the imagination, and ultimately defines the kind of life one chooses to lead. A distinguished roster of specialists have written an authoritative guide to the entire philosophical (...)
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  14. Daniel M. Gross (2006). The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 54.0
    Princess Diana’s death was a tragedy that provoked mourning across the globe; the death of a homeless person, more often than not, is met with apathy. How can we account for this uneven distribution of emotion? Can it simply be explained by the prevailing scientific understanding? Uncovering a rich tradition beginning with Aristotle, The Secret History of Emotion offers a counterpoint to the way we generally understand emotions today. Through a radical rereading of Aristotle, Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Sarah Fielding, (...)
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  15. Arthur Still (2012). The Historical and Philosophical Context of Rational Psychotherapy: The Legacy of Epictetus. Karnac.score: 54.0
    The place of rationality in Stoicism and REBT -- Ellis and Epictetus: dialogue vs. method in psychotherapy -- The intellectual origins of Rational Psychotherapy: twentieth-century writers -- REBT and rationality: philosophical approaches -- Rationality and the shoulds -- When did a psychologist last discuss "chagrin"?: American psychology's continuing moral project -- The social psychology of "pseudoscience": a brief history -- Historical aspects of mindfulness and self-acceptance in psychotherapy -- Marginalisation is not unbearable, is it even undesirable?
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  16. Brad Inwood (1985). Ethics and Human Action in Early Stoicism. Oxford University Press.score: 50.0
    This book reconstructs in detail the older Stoic theory of the psychology of action, discussing it in relation to Aristotelian, Epicurean, Platonic, and some of the more influential modern theories. Important Greek terms are transliterated and explained; no knowledge of Greek is required.
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  17. Runar M. Thorsteinsson (2010). Roman Christianity and Roman Stoicism: A Comparative Study of Ancient Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 50.0
    Runar M. Thorsteinsson presents a challenge to this view by comparing Christian morality in first-century Rome with contemporary Stoic ethics in the city ...
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  18. Jean-Louis Labarrière (2005). La Condition Animale: Études Sur Aristote Et les Stoïciens. Peeters.score: 48.0
    Les douze etudes ici proposees jalonnent un parcours s'etalant sur une vingtaine d'annees et s'etant ordonne autour d'une question centrale: et si nous n'avions rien entendu de la difference introduite par le logos entre l'homme et l'animal ...
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  19. Margaret E. [from old catalog] Reesor (1951). The Political Theory of the Old and Middle Stoa. New York, J. J. Augustin.score: 48.0
     
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  20. R. W. Sharples (ed.) (2010). Particulars in Greek Philosophy: The Seventh S.V. Keeling Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy. Brill.score: 48.0
  21. R. W. Sharples (ed.) (2010). Particulars in Greek Philosophy: The Seventh S. Brill.score: 48.0
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  22. Susanne Bobzien (2012). A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):292-293.score: 42.0
    Much of chapters 2 to 6 is in agreement with publications from the last twenty years (including those of the reviewer); so for example Frede’s points that neither Aristotle nor the Stoics had a notion of free-will; that in Epictetus (for the first time) the notions of freedom and will were combined; that an indeterminist notion of free-will occurs first in Alexander. The achievement of these chapters lies in the way Frede carefully joins them together and uses them as (...)
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  23. Richard T. W. Arthur (2011). Natural Deduction: An Introduction to Logic with Real Arguments, a Little History and Some Humour. Broadview Press.score: 42.0
    Richard Arthur's Natural Deduction provides a wide-ranging introduction to logic. In lively and readable prose, Arthur presents a new approach to the study of logic, one that seeks to integrate methods of argument analysis developed in modern "informal logic" with natural deduction techniques. The dry bones of logic are given flesh by unusual attention to the history of the subject, from Pythagoras, the Stoics, and Indian Buddhist logic, through Lewis Carroll, Venn, and Boole, to Russell, Frege, and Monty (...)
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  24. Karsten Friis Johansen (1999). A History of Ancient Philosophy: From the Beginning to Augustine. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Translated by Henrik Rosenmeier, A History of Ancient Philosophy charts the origins and development of ancient philosophical thought. For easy reference, the book is divided chronologically into six main parts. The sections are further divided into philosophers and philosophical movements: *Pre-Socratic Philosophy, including mythology, the Pythagoreans and Parmenides *The Great Century of Athens, including the Sophists and Socrates *Plato, including The Republic, The Symposium and The Timaeus *Aristotle, including The Physics, The Metaphysics and The Poetics *Hellenistic Philosophy, including the (...)
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  25. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this (...)
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  26. John R. Bowlin (1999). Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    In this study John Bowlin argues that Aquinas's moral theology receives much of its character and content from an assumption about our common lot: the good we desire is difficult to know and to will, in particular because of contingencies of various kinds - within ourselves, in the ends and objects we pursue, and in the circumstances of choice. Since contingencies are fortune's effects, Aquinas insists that it is fortune that makes good choice difficult. Bowlin then explicates Aquinas's treatment of (...)
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  27. de Libera Alain & Massin Olivier (2014). Qu'est-ce qu'une fondue ? [What is a fondue?]. In Massin Olivier & Meylan Anne (eds.), Aristote chez les Helvètes. Ithaque.score: 36.0
    We review the history of the philosophy of fondue since Aristotle so as to arrive at the formulation of the paradox of Swiss fondue. Either the wine and the cheese cease to exist (Buridan), but then the fondue is not really a mixture of wine and cheese. Or the wine and the cheese continue to exist. If they do, then either they continue to exist in different places (the chemists), but then a fondue can never be perfectly homogenous (it (...)
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  28. Ian Hunter (2002). The Morals of Metaphysics: Kant's 'Groundwork' as Intellectual Paideia. Critical Inquiry 28 (4):908-929.score: 36.0
    To approach philosophy as a way of working on the self means to begin not with the experience it clarifies and the subject it discovers, but with the acts of self‐transformation it requires and the subjectivity it seeks to fashion. Commenting on the variety of spiritual exercises to be found in the ancient schools, Pierre Hadot remarks that: Some, like Plutarch’s ethismoi, designed to curb curiosity, anger or gossip, were only practices intended to ensure good moral habits. Others, particularly the (...)
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  29. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 36.0
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the perfect (...)
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  30. William O. Stephens, Stoic Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 34.0
    The tremendous influence Stoicism has exerted on ethical thought from early Christianity through Immanuel Kant and into the twentieth century is rarely understood and even more rarely appreciated. Throughout history, Stoic ethical doctrines have both provoked harsh criticisms and inspired enthusiastic defenders. The Stoics defined the goal in life as living in agreement with nature. Humans, unlike all other animals, are constituted by nature to develop reason as adults, which transforms their understanding of themselves and their own true (...)
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  31. J. B. Schneewind (2010). Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Theory. Moral knowledge and moral principles -- Victorian Matters. First principles and common-sense morality in Sidgwick's ethics ; Moral problems and moral philosophy in the Victorian Period -- On the historiography of moral philosophy. Moral crisis and the history of ethics ; Modern moral philosophy : from beginning to end? : No discipline, no history : the case of moral philosophy ; Teaching the history of moral philosophy -- Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century moral philosophy. The divine corporation and (...)
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  32. Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.) (2004). Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier.score: 30.0
    Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Gödel, The Emergence of Classical Logic, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. Further volumes will follow, including Mediaeval (...)
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  33. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part Two). In Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. CUP.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic theory of arguments, including truth-value changes of arguments, Stoic syllogistic, Stoic indemonstrable arguments, Stoic inference rules (themata), including cut rules and antilogism, argumental deduction, elements of relevance logic in Stoic syllogistic, the question of completeness of Stoic logic, Stoic arguments valid in the specific sense, e.g. "Dio says it is day. But Dio speaks truly. Therefore it is day." A more formal and more detailed account of the Stoic theory of deduction can be found (...)
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  34. Susanne Bobzien (1999). Logic: The Stoics (Part One). In Keimpe Algra & et al (eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT: A detailed presentation of Stoic logic, part one, including their theories of propositions (or assertibles, Greek: axiomata), demonstratives, temporal truth, simple propositions, non-simple propositions(conjunction, disjunction, conditional), quantified propositions, logical truths, modal logic, and general theory of arguments (including definition, validity, soundness, classification of invalid arguments).
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  35. Robert Blair Edlow (1975). The Stoics on Ambiguity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (4):423-435.score: 30.0
    This paper attempts to recover a long neglected chapter in the philosophy of language as it developed in antiquity--The ancient greek stoics' teaching on ambiguity. Although the overwhelming majority of the doxographical accounts of this subject have been lost, Sufficient entries have survived to allow a partial description of the stoic doctrine. What is intriguing about the stoics' teaching is the subtlety of some of the kinds of ambiguity they include in their catalogue. The types of ambiguity that (...)
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  36. Ruben Buys (2011). Between Actor and Spectator: Arnout Geulincx and the Stoics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):741-761.score: 30.0
    The work of Arnout Geulincx (1624?1669), a Flemish Cartesian that developed a highly curious ?parallelistic? view on the universe, shows striking prima facie resemblances to Stoicism. Should we label Geulincx a reinventor of Stoic tenets, albeit within a strict Cartesian theoretical framework? To answer this question, my contribution begins by discussing relevant aspects of Stoicism and by introducing the ?existential? philosophy of Geulincx, whose metaphysical views on man brought him to adopt an ethics based upon absolute obedience and humility. It (...)
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  37. Sven Schlotter, Karlheinz Hülser & Gottfried Gabriel (2009). Zur Miete Bei Frege – Rudolf Hirzel Und Die Rezeption der Stoischen Logik Und Semantik in Jena. History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (4):369-388.score: 30.0
    It has been noted before in the history of logic that some of Frege's logical and semantic views were anticipated in Stoicism. In particular, there seems to be a parallel between Frege's Gedanke (thought) and Stoic lekton; and the distinction between complete and incomplete lekta has an equivalent in Frege's logic. However, nobody has so far claimed that Frege was actually influenced by Stoic logic; and there has until now been no indication of such a causal connection. In this (...)
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  38. John M. Rist (1969). Stoic Philosophy. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 30.0
    Literature on the Stoa has recently concentrated on historical accounts of the development of the school and on Stoicism as a social movement. Professor Rist’s approach is to examine in detail a series of philosophical problems discussed by leading members of the Stoic school. He is not concerned with social history or with the influence of Stoicism on popular beliefs in the Ancient world, but with such questions as the relation between Stoicism and the thought of Aristotle, the meaning (...)
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  39. Nancy Sherman (2005). Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    While few soldiers may have read the works of Epictetus or Marcus Aurelius, it is undoubtedly true that the ancient philosophy known as Stoicism guides the actions of many in the military. Soldiers and seamen learn early in their training "to suck it up," to endure, to put aside their feelings and to get on with the mission. Stoic Warriors is the first book to delve deeply into the ancient legacy of this relationship, exploring what the Stoic philosophy actually is, (...)
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  40. Maykʻl Papazian (2007). The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):488-490.score: 30.0
    The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism is an important book which reconstructs the arguments deployed by the Stoics in favour of the view that everything is necessary and examines the development of the different arguments given by the Stoics that this is compatible with moral responsibility and desert. The book carefully distinguishes two separate theses in Stoic theory, that everything that happens and is the case has a cause and that causation is necessitating. The book also provides (...)
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  41. John Sellars (2012). Stoics Against Stoics In Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):935-952.score: 26.0
    In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ?up to us? and that these things are the product of our choice. These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim (...)
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  42. Elias Capriles (2008). Hegel's Inversion of the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic View of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:39-45.score: 26.0
    Hegel inverted the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic view of human spiritual and social evolution by presenting it as a progressive perfecting rather than as a progressive degeneration impelled by the gradual development of the basic human delusion called avidya (unawareness). Since he cancelled the crucial map /territory distinction, he had to explain change in nature as the negation of the immediately preceding state, and since he wanted spiritual and social evolution to be a process of perfecting, he had to (...)
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  43. David Forman (2008). Free Will and the Freedom of the Sage in Leibniz and the Stoics. History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (3):203-219.score: 24.0
  44. Anderson Weekes (2006). Abstraction and Individuation in Whitehead and Wiehl: A Comparative Historical Approach. In Michel Weber Pierfrancesco Basile (ed.), Subjectivity, Process, and Rationality. Ontos Verlag.score: 24.0
    This paper looks at the history of the problem of individuation from Plato to Whitehead. Part I takes as its point of departure Reiner Wiehl’s interpretation of the different meanings of “abstract” in the metaphysics of Alfred North Whitehead and arrives at a corresponding taxonomy of different ways things can be called concrete. Part II compares the way philosophers in different periods understand the relation between thought and intuition. The view mostly associated with ancient philosophy is that thought and (...)
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  45. Jean Kazez (2007). The Weight of Things: Philosophy and the Good Life. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    The Weight of Things explores the hard questions of our daily lives, examining both classic and contemporary accounts of what it means to lead 'the good life'. Looks at the views of philosophers such as Aristotle, the Stoics, Mill, Nietzsche, and Sartre as well as contributions from other traditions, such as Buddhism Incorporates key arguments from contemporary philosophers including Peter Singer, Martha Nussbaum, Robert Nozick, John Finnis, and Susan Wolf Uses examples from biography, literature, history, movies and media, (...)
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  46. Gisela Striker (ed.) (1974/1996). Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The doctrines of the Hellenistic Schools - Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics - are known to have had a formative influence on later thought, but because the primary sources are lost, they have to be reconstructed from later reports. This important collection of essays by one of the foremost interpreters of Hellenistic philosophy focuses on key questions in epistemology and ethics debated by Greek and Roman philosophers of the Hellenistic period. There is currently a new awareness of the great interest (...)
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  47. John M. Cooper (2005). The Emotional Life of the Wise. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):176-218.score: 24.0
    The ancient Stoics notoriously argued, with thoroughness and force, that all ordinary “emotions” (passions, mental affections: in Greek, pãyh) are thoroughly bad states of mind, not to be indulged in by anyone, under any circumstances: anger, resentment, gloating; pity, sympathy, grief; delight, glee, pleasure; impassioned love (i.e. ¶rvw), agitated desires of any kind, fear; disappointment, regret, all sorts of sorrow; hatred, contempt, schadenfreude. Early on in the history of Stoicism, however, apparently in order to avoid the objection that (...)
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  48. J. C. B. Gosling & C. C. W. Taylor (1982). The Greeks on Pleasure. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Provides a critical and analytical history of ancient Greek theories on the nature of pleasure, and of its value and rolein human lfie, from the ealriest times down to the period of Epicurus and the early Stoics.
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  49. Rachel Barney (1992). Appearances and Impressions. Phronesis 37 (3):283-313.score: 24.0
    Pyrrhonian sceptics claim, notoriously, to assent to the appearances without making claims about how things are. To see whether this is coherent we need to consider the philosophical history of ‘appearance’(phainesthai)-talk, and the closely related concept of an impression (phantasia). This history suggests that the sceptics resemble Plato in lacking the ‘non-epistemic’ or ‘non-doxastic’ conception of appearance developed by Aristotle and the Stoics. What is distinctive about the Pyrrhonian sceptic is simply that the degree of doxastic commitment (...)
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