Search results for 'Stoics Influence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lois Peters Agnew (2008). Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics. University of South Carolina Press.score: 72.0
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
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  2. Brad Inwood (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This unique volume offers an odyssey through the ideas of the Stoics in three particular ways: first, through the historical trajectory of the school itself and its influence; second, through the recovery of the history of Stoic thought; third, through the ongoing confrontation with Stoicism, showing how it refines philosophical traditions, challenges the imagination, and ultimately defines the kind of life one chooses to lead. A distinguished roster of specialists have written an authoritative guide to the entire philosophical (...)
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  3. Tony Honoré, Ulpian, Natural Law and Stoic Influence.score: 60.0
    The first text of Justinian’s sixth century Digest records that Ulpian, the leading lawyer from Syria and counsellor to successive emperors of the Severan age (AD 193-235), related the term ‘law’ to four elements: art, religion, ethics and philosophy.2 Law is the art of the good and equitable, of which lawyers can well be called priests. They cultivate justice and the knowledge of right and wrong, and aim, unless Ulpian is mistaken, at the true philosophy.3 He goes on to say (...)
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  4. Charles Burnett, José Francisco Meirinhos, Jacqueline Hamesse & Guido Giglioni (eds.) (2008). Continuities and Disruptions Between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance: Proceedings of the Colloquium Held at the Warburg Institute, 15-16 June 2007, Jointly Organised by the Warburg Institute and the Gabinete de Filosofia Medieval. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 60.0
  5. Barbara Neymeyr, Jochen Schmidt & Bernhard Zimmermann (eds.) (2008). Stoizismus in der Europäischen Philosophie, Literatur, Kunst Und Politik: Eine Kulturgeschichte von der Antike Bis Zur Moderne. De Gruyter.score: 60.0
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  6. Richard Sorabji (2000/2002). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Oxford University Press.score: 46.0
    Richard Sorabji presents a ground-breaking study of ancient Greek views of the emotions and their influence on subsequent theories and attitudes, Pagan and Christian. While the central focus of the book is the Stoics, Sorabji draws on a vast range of texts to give a rich historical survey of how Western thinking about this central aspect of human nature developed.
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  7. Christoph Jedan (2009). Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics. Continuum.score: 46.0
    The book argues that the theological motifs in Stoic philosophy are pivotal to our understanding of Stoic ethics. Part One offers an introductory overview of the religious world view of the Stoics. Part Two examines the Stoic characterizations of virtue and the virtues. Part Three deals with Stoic theories of how human beings can become virtuous. Part Four studies the practices of Stoic ethics. It shows inter alia how the Chrysippean table of virtues is still an (unacknowledged) influence (...)
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  8. Christopher Gill (2007). Galen and the Stoics: Mortal Enemies or Blood Brothers? Phronesis 52 (1):88-120.score: 42.0
    Galen is well known as a critic of Stoicism, mainly for his massive attack on Stoic (or at least, Chrysippean) psychology in "On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato" (PHP) 2-5. Galen attacks both Chrysippus' location of the ruling part of the psyche in the heart and his unified or monistic picture of human psychology. However, if we consider Galen's thought more broadly, this has a good deal in common with Stoicism, including a (largely) physicalist conception of psychology and a (...)
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  9. Robert Mark Wenley (1963). Stoicism and its Influence. New York, Cooper Square Publishers.score: 42.0
  10. W. S. Anderson (2004). Academics: As Influence on Horace, 269, 277, 280 Actium, 313 Adultery: Stoic View on, 276. See Also Gods, Sexual Behavior of; Sex. [REVIEW] In David Armstrong (ed.), Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press. 43--347.score: 40.0
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  11. William O. Stephens, Stoic Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 38.0
    The tremendous influence Stoicism has exerted on ethical thought from early Christianity through Immanuel Kant and into the twentieth century is rarely understood and even more rarely appreciated. Throughout history, Stoic ethical doctrines have both provoked harsh criticisms and inspired enthusiastic defenders. The Stoics defined the goal in life as living in agreement with nature. Humans, unlike all other animals, are constituted by nature to develop reason as adults, which transforms their understanding of themselves and their own true (...)
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  12. Anna Eunyoung Ju (2009). The Stoic Ontology of Geometrical Limits. Phronesis 54 (4):371-389.score: 38.0
    Scholars have long recognised the interest of the Stoics' thought on geometrical limits, both as a specific topic in their physics and within the context of the school's ontological taxonomy. Unfortunately, insufficient textual evidence remains for us to reconstruct their discussion fully. The sources we do have on Stoic geometrical themes are highly polemical, tending to reveal a disagreement as to whether limit is to be understood as a mere concept, as a body or as an incorporeal. In my (...)
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  13. Margaret J. Osler (ed.) (1991). Atoms, Pneuma, and Tranquillity: Epicurean and Stoic Themes in European Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 34.0
    This volume examines the influence that Epicureanism and Stoicism, two philosophies of nature and human nature articulated during classical times, exerted on the development of European thought to the Enlightenment. Although the influence of these philosophies has often been noted in certain areas, such as the influence of Stoicism on the development of Christian thought and the influence of Epicureanism on modern materialism, the chapters in this volume forward a new awareness of the degree to which (...)
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  14. John M. Rist (1969). Stoic Philosophy. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 34.0
    Literature on the Stoa has recently concentrated on historical accounts of the development of the school and on Stoicism as a social movement. Professor Rist’s approach is to examine in detail a series of philosophical problems discussed by leading members of the Stoic school. He is not concerned with social history or with the influence of Stoicism on popular beliefs in the Ancient world, but with such questions as the relation between Stoicism and the thought of Aristotle, the meaning (...)
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  15. Richard Kraut (1994). Desire and the Human Good. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (2):315.score: 24.0
    When wc compare contemporary moral philosophy with thc wcll-known moral systems of earlier centuries, wc should bc struck by thc fact that a certain assumption about human well being that is now widely taken for granted was universally rcjcctcd in thc past. The contemporary moral climate prcdisposcs us to bc pluralistic about thc human good, whcrcas earlier systems of ethics embraced a conception of wcll being that wc would now call narrow and restrictive. One way to convey thc sort of (...)
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  16. R. W. Sharples (1996). Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics: An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The Hellenistic philosophers and schools of philosophy are emerging from the shadow of Plato and Aristotle and are increasingly studied for their intrinsic philosophical value. They are not only interesting in their own right, but also form the intellectual background of the late Roman Republic. This study gives a comprehensive and readable account of the principal doctrines of the Stoics, Epicureans and various sceptical traditions from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to around 200 A.D. Discussions (...)
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  17. Jim Stone (2009). Trumping the Causal Influence Account of Causation. Philosophical Studies 142 (2):153 - 160.score: 24.0
    Here is a simple counterexample to David Lewis’s causal influence account of causation, one that is especially illuminating due to its connection to what Lewis himself writes: it is a variant of his trumping example.
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  18. Catherine Atherton (1993). The Stoics on Ambiguity. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Stoic work on ambiguity represents one of the most innovative, sophisticated, and rigorous contributions to philosophy and the study of language in western antiquity. This book is both the first comprehensive survey of the often difficult and scattered sources, and the first attempt to locate Stoic material in the rich array of contexts, ancient and modern, which alone can guarantee full appreciation of its subtlety, scope and complexity. The comparisons and contrasts which this book constructs will intrigue not just classical (...)
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  19. Gisela Striker (ed.) (1974/1996). Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The doctrines of the Hellenistic Schools - Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics - are known to have had a formative influence on later thought, but because the primary sources are lost, they have to be reconstructed from later reports. This important collection of essays by one of the foremost interpreters of Hellenistic philosophy focuses on key questions in epistemology and ethics debated by Greek and Roman philosophers of the Hellenistic period. There is currently a new awareness of the great (...)
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  20. Brad Inwood & Lloyd P. Gerson (eds.) (2008). The Stoics Reader: Selected Writings and Testimonia. Hackett Pub. Co., Inc..score: 24.0
    Lives of the stoics (Zeno, Aristo, Herillus, Cleanthes, Sphaerus, Chrysippus) on philosophy -- Logic and theory of knowledge -- Perception, knowledge, and sceptical attack -- The stoic-academic debate and Cicero's testimony -- Conceptions and rationality -- Physics -- Theology -- Bodily and non-bodily realities -- Structures and powers -- The soul -- Fate -- Ethics -- The general account in Diogenes Lartius -- The account preserved by Stobaeus -- The account in Cicero on goals -- Other evidence for stoic (...)
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  21. Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) (2004). Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Stoicism is now widely recognized as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The contributors recruited for this volume include leading international scholars of Stoicism as well as experts in later periods of philosophy. They trace the impact of Stoicism and Stoic ideas from late antiquity through the medieval and modern periods.
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  22. Christiane L. Joost-Gaugier (2006). Measuring Heaven: Pythagoras and His Influence on Thought and Art in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    "In this illustrated book, Christiane L. Joost-Gaugier sets out the panorama of Pythagoras's influence and that of Christian and Jewish thinkers who followed ...
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  23. Jamie R. Hendry (2005). Stakeholder Influence Strategies: An Empirical Exploration. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):79 - 99.score: 24.0
    In the present study, I sought to more fully understand stakeholder organizations’ strategies for influencing business firms. I conducted interviews with 28 representatives of four environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs): Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Greenpeace, Environmental Defense (ED), and Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). Qualitative methods were used to analyze this data, and additional data in the form of reviews of websites and other documents was conducted when provided by interviewees or needed to more fully comprehend interviewee’s comments. Six propositions (...)
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  24. John Dillon (2007). Iamblichus' Defence of Theurgy: Some Reflections. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (1):30-41.score: 24.0
    An issue which plainly exercised the thoughts of many intellectuals in the late antique world was that of man's relation to the gods, and specifically the problems of the mode of interaction between the human and divine planes of existence. Once one accepted, as anyone with any philosophical training did, that God, or the gods, were not subject to passions, and that, as not only Stoics but also Platonists, at least after the time of Plotinus, believed, the world-order was (...)
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  25. Kevin D. Bradford & Debra M. Desrochers (2009). The Use of Scents to Influence Consumers: The Sense of Using Scents to Make Cents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):141 - 153.score: 24.0
    Since the sense of smell cannot be turned off and it prompts immediate, emotional responses, marketers are becoming aware of its usefulness in communicating with consumers. Consequently, over the last few years consumers have been increasingly influenced by ambient scents, which are defined as general odors that do not emanate from a product but are present as part of the retail environment. The goal of this article is to create awareness of the ethical issues in the scent marketing industry. In (...)
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  26. Sarah Wright (2012). How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.score: 24.0
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism (...)
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  27. Andreas Graeser (1972). Plotinus and the Stoics. Leiden,Brill.score: 24.0
    Among those in question, Aristotle 6 and the Peripatetics, the Stoics and also the Epicureans,7 were the main opponents 8 to For a good account of the ...
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  28. Daniel J. O'Keefe (2012). Conviction, Persuasion, and Argumentation: Untangling the Ends and Means of Influence. [REVIEW] Argumentation 26 (1):19-32.score: 24.0
    This essay offers a start on sorting out the relationships of argumentation and persuasion by identifying two systematic ways in which definitions of argumentation differ, namely, their descriptions of the ends and of the means involved in argumentative discourse. Against that backdrop, the traditional “conviction-persuasion” distinction is reassessed. The essay argues that the traditional distinction correctly recognizes the difference between the end of influencing attitudes and that of influencing behavior—but that it misanalyzes the means of achieving the latter (by focusing (...)
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  29. Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (2005). The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Roman Stoic thinkers in the imperial period adapted Greek doctrine to create a model of the self that served to connect philosophical ideals with traditional societal values. The Roman Stoics-the most prominent being Marcus Aurelius-engaged in rigorous self-examination that enabled them to integrate philosophy into the practice of living. Gretchen Reydams-Schils's innovative new book shows how these Romans applied their distinct brand of social ethics to everyday relations and responsibilities. The Roman Stoics reexamines the philosophical basis that instructed (...)
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  30. Ricardo Salles (ed.) (2005). Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Leading figures in ancient philosophy present nineteen original papers on three key themes in the work of Richard Sorabji. The papers dealing with Metaphysics range from Democritus to Numenius on basic questions about the structure and nature of reality: necessitation, properties, and time. The section on Soul includes one paper on the individuation of souls in Plato and five papers on Aristotle's and Aristotelian theories of cognition, with a special emphasis on perception. The section devoted to Ethics concentrates upon Stoicism (...)
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  31. Emily Largent, Christine Grady, Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2013). Misconceptions About Coercion and Undue Influence: Reflections on the Views of Irb Members. Bioethics 27 (9):500-507.score: 24.0
    Payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice but raises ethical concerns relating to the potential for coercion or undue influence. We conducted the first national study of IRB members and human subjects protection professionals to explore attitudes as to whether and why payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence. Upon critical evaluation of the cogency of ethical concerns regarding payment, as reflected in our survey results, we found expansive or inconsistent views about coercion and (...)
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  32. Weixiang Ding (2011). Zhu Xi's Choice, Historical Criticism and Influence—An Analysis of Zhu Xi's Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.score: 24.0
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xi’s influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhu’s relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong (...)
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  33. David Charles Gore (2011). Sophists and Sophistry in the Wealth of Nations. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (1):1-26.score: 24.0
    The Stoic, David Hume’s “man of action and virtue,” is often considered the forerunner and foundation of Adam Smith’s market man of morals (Hume 1985, 146–54). Ian Simpson Ross notes Smith’s enthusiasm for Stoic philosophers such as Cicero and Marcus Aurelius and the way Stoic philosophy informs Smith’s arguments on various topics such as self-command, self-love, and suicide (Ross 1995, 172, 384). Pierre Force confirms the influence of Stoicism in tracing Smith’s moral system as a contrast with the Epicurean/Augustinian (...)
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  34. Cormac M. Nagle (2013). Giving Due Emphasis to the Human Person in Catholic Moral Teaching. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (1):47.score: 24.0
    Nagle, Cormac M The advent of the social sciences, psychology and sociology, and their development over the past eighty years or so have made us much more aware of the integrated nature of the human person. Today we are less likely to speak about souls and bodies as separate entities or to be dualistic in our thinking. Nevertheless, the influence of the Stoics in their teaching on natural law and its ethical implications, based on what is natural physically, (...)
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  35. Ernesto Paparazzo (2005). The Elder Pliny, Posidonius and Surfaces. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (2):363-376.score: 24.0
    This paper tries to demonstrate that some passages of Pliny's Naturalis historia on metallurgical materials are influenced by the Stoic philosopher Posidonius' view that surfaces possess a physical existence. Indeed, Pliny reports that copper surfaces are material, both acting towards drawing a patina to themselves, and being acted upon; i.e. they are both chemically modified by air and fire, and subject to mechanical removal. Also relatable to Posidonius, namely to his view of the interaction between soul and body, is Pliny's (...)
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  36. David A. Ralston & Allison Pearson (2010). The Cross-Cultural Evolution of the Subordinate Influence Ethics Measure. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):149 - 168.score: 24.0
    The purpose of our article is to describe the initial development process of the subordinate influence ethics (SIE) measure, an instrument that was crossculturally conceived, designed, and validity tested to measure upward influence ethics strategies of professional subordinates across different societies, as well as within a single society. Development of the SIE began by defining the SIE constructs through theoretical review and empirical (nominal group technique) assessments in Germany, France, Hong Kong, and the U. S. In the present (...)
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  37. Michel Grabisch & Agnieszka Rusinowska (2010). A Model of Influence in a Social Network. Theory and Decision 69 (1):69-96.score: 24.0
    In the paper, we study a model of influence in a social network. It is assumed that each player has an inclination to say YES or NO which, due to influence of other players, may be different from the decision of the player. The point of departure here is the concept of the Hoede-Bakker index - the notion which computes the overall decisional 'power' of a player in a social network. The main drawback of the Hoede-Bakker index is (...)
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  38. Gloria Vivenza (2001). Adam Smith and the Classics: The Classical Heritage in Adam Smith's Thought. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Adam Smith and the Classics analyses the influence of classical culture---the work of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and the Stoics---on Adam Smith's thought. Vivenza bases her arguments on elements of Smith's work that can be shown to be precise reflections of passages from the classical authors, and on Smith's own acknowledgements that he was so influenced. The bulk of the classical nuances occur in Smith's moral and natural philosophy, but Vivenza also shows that the classics had some impact on (...)
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  39. Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (eds.) (2009). Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Indiana University Press.score: 24.0
    Addresses questions of influence between two of the 20th century's greatest minds.
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  40. Sanjay Putrevu & Krist Swimberghek (2013). The Influence of Religiosity on Consumer Ethical Judgments and Responses Toward Sexual Appeals. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):351-365.score: 24.0
    This research explores the influence of religiosity on consumer perception of, and response toward, sexual appeals. The first study (survey, national sample; n = 423) examines the relationship between religiosity and consumer response toward sexual appeals using causal modeling. Study 1 finds that high intrinsic religiosity consumers exhibit more adverse ethical judgments toward the company’s use of sexual appeals and these judgments, in turn, result in inferior attitudes and purchase intent toward the advertised brand. To confirm and expand on (...)
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  41. David Reinstein & Gerhard Riener (2012). Reputation and Influence in Charitable Giving: An Experiment. Theory and Decision 72 (2):221-243.score: 24.0
    Previous experimental and observational work suggests that people act more generously when they are observed and observe others in social settings. However, the explanation for this is unclear. An individual may want to send a signal of her generosity to improve her own reputation. Alternately (or additionally) she may value the public good or charity itself and, believing that contribution levels are strategic complements, give more to influence others to give more. We perform the first series of laboratory experiments (...)
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  42. Hester M. Bovenkamp & Margo J. Trappenburg (2011). Government Influence on Patient Organizations. Health Care Analysis 19 (4):329-351.score: 24.0
    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and Dutch patient organizations to learn (...)
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  43. Agnes J. Jasinska Emily B. Falk, Baldwin M. Way (2012). An Imaging Genetics Approach to Understanding Social Influence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain’s reward system. We next review neuroimaging evidence linking social punishment (exclusion) to brain (...)
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  44. E. Boshoff & M. Kotzé (2011). The Conceptualization and Measurement of Philosophical Approaches That Influence Ethical Decision Making in the Work Context: Part 1. African Journal of Business Ethics 5 (1):36.score: 24.0
    The negative consequences which unethical behaviour holds for organizations necessitates a focus on ethical issues within the work context, as well as factors which may have an influence on ethical behaviour. Regarding individual factors, researchers indicate that the individual's ethical decision-making philosophy influences the manner in which ethical problems are managed and behavioural decisions are made. The aim of this article (which forms part of a research project consisting of four parts) is therefore to investigate, by means of a (...)
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  45. Roland Pongou, Bertrand Tchantcho & Lawrence Diffo Lambo (2011). Political Influence in Multi-Choice Institutions: Cyclicity, Anonymity, and Transitivity. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 70 (2):157-178.score: 24.0
    We study political influence in institutions where each member chooses a level of support for a collective goal. These individual choices determine the degree to which the goal is reached. Influence is assessed by newly defined binary relations, each of which ranks members on the basis of their relative performance at a corresponding level of participation. For institutions with three options (e.g., voting games in which each voter may vote “yes”, “abstain”, or vote “no”), we obtain three (...) relations, and show that their strict components may be cyclic. This latter property describes a “paradox of power” which contrasts with the transitivity of the unique influence relation of binary voting games. Weak conditions of anonymity suffice for each of these relations to be transitive. We also obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for each of these relations to be complete. Further, we characterize institutions in which the rankings induced by these relations, and the Banzhaf–Coleman and Shapley–Shubik power indices coincide. We argue that extending the influence relations to firms would be useful in efficiently assigning workers to different units of production. Finally, we provide applications to various forms of political and economic organizations. (shrink)
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  46. Padma Rao Sahib (2013). Status, Peer Influence, and Racio-Ethnic Diversity in Times of Institutional Change: An Examination From European Labour Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 24.0
    This paper employs institutional theory as a theoretical lens and examines the role of status and peer influence on diversity following a change in European labour law in 1995. This change in European labour law, well-known as the Bosman ruling, significantly increased labour mobility in European soccer. The ruling lifted restrictions on the number of foreign players that soccer teams could recruit and eliminated compulsory transfer fees for players whose contracts had ended. We demonstrate that the Bosman ruling, while (...)
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  47. Rosemary Auchmuty (2003). When Equality Is Not Equity:Homosexual Inclusion in Undue Influence Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (2):163-190.score: 24.0
    In Barclay's Bank v. O'Brien(1993) the House of Lords extended the undue influence rules to heterosexual and homosexual cohabitees, a move that was widely welcomed and has been endorsed in Royal Bank of Scotland v. Etridge (No. 2) (2001). The paper argues that the extension to homosexual couples is inappropriate, since undue influence is largely a problem of heterosexuality. It is not accidental that there have been no reported cases of undue influence between lesbian or gay partners, (...)
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  48. G. R. Boys-Stones (2001). Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of its Development From the Stoics to Origen. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book traces, for the first time, a revolution in philosophy which took place during the early centuries of our era. It reconstructs the philosophical basis of the Stoics' theory that fragments of an ancient and divine wisdom could be reconstructed from mythological traditions, and shows that Platonism was founded on an argument that Plato had himself achieved a full reconstruction of this wisdom, and that subsequent philosophies had only regressed once again in their attempts to "improve" on his (...)
     
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  49. Emily B. Falk, Baldwin M. Way & Agnes J. Jasinska (2012). An Imaging Genetics Approach to Understanding Social Influence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain’s reward system. We next review neuroimaging evidence linking social punishment (exclusion) to brain (...)
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